area code changes #general


Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

We haven't had much discussion here on the genealogical impact
of area code changes. As a recent victim, I thought it time
to speak up!

Changing U.S. area codes can mean, among other things, that your
out-of-town cousins who finally decide to tell you all about
their family get a "wrong number," or that when you try to reach
relatives, their numbers appear to be wrong.

The changeover process is relatively quick: here in Suffolk
County, Long Island, we had six months notice of an impending
change (516 to 631), then a five-month "permissive" period
during which either area code worked. We're now into the
"mandatory" phase: callers who dial 516 get a recording telling
them to dial 631, but soon they'll get the dreaded "You've
reached a nonworking number." (Note that Nassau County--western
Long Island--has retained the 516 area code.)

Area code splits and overlays are occurring at a rapid rate. Some
new area codes for places with large Jewish populations are 240,
267, 347, 443, 646, 732, and 786. Don't recognize them? See
http://www-cse.ucsd.edu/users/bsy/area.state.html for a listing of
codes by state and http://www-cse.ucsd.edu/users/bsy/area.html for
a list by number. Another useful site is
http://www.lincmad.com/cities.html
Area code maps at http://www.nanpa.com/ are easy to read, but not
up to the minute.

You may want to check these sites to update your family phone
listings and if you get a "sorry, wrong number" when you dial
mishpacha.

Renee

Renee Steinig
RSteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us

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