Re: false surnames #belarus


Norma Brewer <nlbrewer@...>
 

I don't think that there was the emphasis on documentation that we have
today- so people could have changed their names without much difficulty.
In England it is still possible to change one's name, just by 'usage', and
that is perfectly valid, though there is also the practice of 'Deed Poll',
where one goes to a solicitor and swears an oath, I think, that one is
changing one's name >from A to B, and then that is published in a newspaper
'Mr A AS, of x * address) announces that >from henceforth he is to be known
as X D' etc.
I am not a lawyer, but I think this is true.
Of course things are difficult with Social Security cards, National
Insurance, and the like, now.
My father was registered as Segalof ( I think). Some of the family use
Segal,
and my father chose Segeal ( pronounced 'si geel', with the accent on the
last syllable, because he thought it sounded nicer or more English.
My mother was born Bercovitch. She and my Uncle Harry bnoth chose to be
known as Burke ( because when my mother went to work as a short hand
typistin the City of London, she didn't want to have people refuse her work
because she was a little ' Jew-girl', My blue-eyed Uncle Harrylikewise. But
my Uncle Jack, who is still alive today, aged 98, as a violinist, found his
original surname not at all a handicap.

Greetings
Norma Brewer
reseaching:
Bercovitch,Freidland, Segalof, Levine
nlbrewer@...

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