Cemetery in Boppard/Buchenau, Germany #general


Slevyrei@...
 

On Sat 23 Feb, 2002, "gypsysm" <gypsysm@gate.net> wrote:

"Searching for information on people buried in Boppard, Germany. Understand
it is a small area and wondered if anyone knows the name of the cemetery
there and how/where we could contact it for possible information. We have
heard that the graves do not have dates on them but hopefully records are
available. Thank you!
Suzanne Fine
Florida"

Boppard is a resort town on the Rhine River about 2 hours north of Frankfurt.
My husband and I were traveling in the area last summer.

His great-grandmother is >from a town called "Buchenau" and he thought it was
near Frankfurt, but when we looked it up prior to our trip, we realized there
are several Buchenaus in Germany, none on our planned route. We decided it
would have to wait till another time when we could do more research.

As we were passing through Boppard, however, I saw a road sign for Buchenau.
We turned that way. This Buchenau, contiguous to Boppard, is a modern suburb
with subdivisions of homes and cul-de-sacs that are no more than 20 years
old. We could have been in Northern Virginia or Southern California. The
draw for the suburb -- many kids headed in that direction --is a huge sports
complex with outdoor pool. We couldn't find a town center other than this
complex and a few house-shops.

One of these house-shops had tombstones for sale. I insisted that my husband
(who speaks a little German) ask if there was a Jewish cemetery. The people
were friendly and pointed to the woods behind the sports complex.

We drove back through the subdivision and parked on a cul de sac. Where now?
We asked a family eating lunch on a screened porch. They pointed and
gestured into the woods.

We left our car there, climbed a hill, crossed a road, still hearing the
shouts >from the sports complex. And down an unused road, surrounded by a
modern chain link fence: a Jewish cemetery in extremely good condition!

I lifted a section of the fence and my husband squeezed underneath. Maybe
150 graves, some recent, some 19th century, some overgrown, some well-kept.
All with names, dates, some Hebrew, some German, some both. Too many for my
husband to make an orderly reconnaisance of every grave in the course of an
hour or two.

There were no signs of vandalism, and there is a big lot on the gate. I
don't know the nearest congregation, but it is definitely still in use.

When I returned to the US, I looked for this cemetery on JewishGen and
couldn't find it, and I wasn't sure how to register it with the Cemetery
Project, so here it is ... take it >from here! I would check with the
archivists at the Jewish Museum in Frankfurt, which seems to be the
repository for much information; unfortunately, we were there when all were
on summer holidays.

Sherry Levy-Reiner
Washington, D.C.

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