Re: abreviations in argentinian police files #general


Carlos Glikson
 

Daniel Vangheluwe asked about abbreviations in Argentinean police files,
1930. If followed by numbers, very probably...

C.I.
will mean Cédula de Identidad - Identity Card: It is the identity document
issued by the Policía Federal (the Federal Police) or by the Police
departments of the different provinces. If a citizen asks for a passport
from the Federal Police, it will have the same number his C.I. has.
Curiously, the Cedula de Identidad is asked for by policemen to identify
people - for example, in a car crash accident - but is not accepted as
proof of identity for official or legal business, as when handling tax
subjects orselling property.

L.E.
stands for Libreta de Enrolamiento - a former document in the format of a
small notebook, issued to males when reaching 18 years old, used in
relation to enrolment in the military service - no longer mandatory at 20
years old - and also to register voting occasions, mandatory in Argentina
for everyone over 18.

L.C.
would be the Libreta Cívica - Daniel does not mention this abbreviation,
but it is the former document issued to females when reaching 18, the
voting age, equivalent to the L.E. but not designed for any military
inscriptions - no military obligations for women at the time - and
probably of later apparition ( I am not checking now, but imagine it
appeared only after women started voting).

L.E. and L.C.
for men and women have been substituted years ago by the

D.N.I.
Documento Nacional de Identidad, National Identity Document - a single
document for men and women, issued when born, updated at 16, with a
notebook format smaller than the old Libretas de Enrolamiento and Libretas
Civicas.

CI, LE, LC, DNI all have numbers unique for each person, just as a Social
Security number in the U.S. is unique. Assignment of the numbers was
basically sequential in batches, with growing numbers indicating younger
people, and small numbers indicating very old documents.

If a relative or ancestor had a L.E. or L.C., that would indicate voting
rights, so if he/she was born abroad it would mean at some moment having
asked for naturalization and becoming an Argentine citizen.

As for the remaining abbreviations Daniel mentioned, they may be specific
of the police (or of blacksheep in the family..) or I may be affected by
the record heat here yesterday! Perhaps if Daniel mails me privately the
abbreviations in the context in which they appear it will be easier to
"decode" them.

Hope this helps,

Carlos GLIKSON
Buenos Aires, Argentina
e-Mail cglikson@ciudad.com.ar

Searching for

GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN: Marijampole, Suwalki, Augustow,
Sejny,Sopotkin,Koenigsberg. POKROISKY, POKROJSKI, POKROY: Suwalki, Seirijai.
Lomza. ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ: Kremenchug, Vilnius. HOLLANDERSKY,
HOLLENDERSKI, HOLLANDER: Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza. TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL:
Kremenchug, Kharkov. FELCHINSKY: Kremenchug, Vilnius, Felschtin?. KARP:
Grodno. SMELIENSKY(?),KRASNAPOLSKY(?), BLUMIGDAL (?), GOLUMBIEWSKY,
GOLOMB(?)

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