Re: Genealogy and Mixed Marriage #general


Dream Builder <dreambuilder@...>
 

Perhaps for those so inclined to keep their family tree limited to only
those who are Jewish, two trees could be constructed - one that includes
only to those who are known to be Jewish and a second that is complete with
non-Jewish relatives, adopted children, step-children, etc. Notes could be
included in the former to refer to the latter where appropriate. In the case
of unmarried couples living together, the unrelated person is usually only
listed when they have children together, although they may be listed
with appropriate notes when desired.

Vicki Ina Friedman
Ball Ground, GA, USA
dreambuilder@tds.net

Researching: BECK, CHORNEY, DUBIN(SKY), FRIEDMAN, RECHMAN, SK(O)LOFF,
THURLIN / TURCHIN, ZEIDELMAN (all >from Russia to USA 1880-1910)

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ann Rabinowitz" <annrab@bellsouth.net>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2005 5:58 AM
Subject: Re: Genealogy and Mixed Marriage

In a message dated 2/1/2005 10:57:41 PM Eastern Standard Time,
balden@zahav.net.il writes:
< The topic "Genealogy and mixed Marriage" has cropped up in my circle, and
although I personally have my own views, I would like to hear the views of
professional Genealogists on this. Is it fair to exclude a member of one's
family
from a family tree due to intermarriage? >
This is an interesting question which I will respond to in terms of my own
research >from many years ago. I was researching Colonial Jewish families
and used Rabbi Malcolm H. Stern's book "First American Jewish Families" as a
resource. Unfortunately, Rabbi Stern did not believe in the inclusion of
non-Jewish descendants and therefore left them out.

While I understood his reason for this and respect it, it was annoying as I
was unable to connect a number of people to their appropriate family trees.
Some of these non-Jews had descendants who eventually married Jews once
again as it so happens in our multi-ethnic society and they wanted to know
about that earlier ancestry.

I hope that those who feel as Rabbi Stern did realize that while your tree
is your own business to construct as you wish, limiting it to Jews only
withholds your heritage >from those who may want to share it despite the fact
that they may not be halachicly Jewish.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net

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