Joyce and the Jews of Dublin Was: First Jews in England--and Ireland #general


Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

<MBernet@aol.com> wrote
In a message dated 7/18/2005 12:09:45 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
tulse04-news@yahoo.co.uk (Nick Landau of London) cites:
The first Jewish families arrived in Britain perhaps with the
Phoenicians, far more than 2000 years ago, as Simon Goulden of the
United Synagogue writes here: Daf Hashavua 23/9/2000
<http://tinyurl.com/7ts5n>

Or else they surely came with the Roman conquest, but even if they did
arrive with William the conqueror as late as 1066, your expectation of
great genealogical resources is not very reasonable. ;-} " <<

The Jews of England were kicked out and only returned after Oliver
Cromwell invited them back. The oldest synagogue in England is
Sephardic, dating >from 1702, and is still very much in use today
despite, not the least, an IRA bomb. I understand that they hold very
good records going back 300 years. The oldest Ashkenazi synagogue from
this period is in Plymouth going back 250 years and I am sure they,
too, have some records.
snip

and responds with:

< The James Joyce Centre, Dublin publishes this article >from the Bloomsday
Centenary of the Irish Times about Jewish Dublin a hundred years ago.

< _http://www.jamesjoyce.ie/templates/text_contents.aspx?page_id=489_
(http://www.jamesjoyce.ie/templates/text_contents.aspx?page_id=489)

< Apparently when Leopold Bloom, the fictitious character of Ulysses, was born
in 1866 there were only a few hundred Jews in Dublin (see this article).>
I think that Mr Bernet might have noticed that I was responding to Mr
Kravitz's statement that:

"> I made no comment or suggestion about places of worship in England/Britain
pre-1702. In James Joyce's Ulysses he comments that there were no Jews in
Ireland but this was not true.
Whilst maybe not relevant to the original posting, if extra material added
which is seems not to be the case, this needs to be contested.

Whilst no James Joyce expert myself, the fact of the above website on James
Joyce discussing the Jewish population of Ireland in the late Nineteenth
Century suggests that the opposite or the case. The website actually
suggests that Joyce was probably more familiar with the Jews of Trieste than
he was those of Dublin.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)

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