Amuletic Names #general


Marlene Bishow
 

Dear Nick

I am not an expert on the subject, but it is my understanding that when a
child became ill, the family might change the child's name to fool the angel
of death. Names such as Chaim and Chaia, meaning "life" were used. In the
instance that I cited in my original posting, I referred to Aunt Annie, who
was named Chaia Chana. In this case, the Chaia was added to her name. I
wonder if this was the way it was (is) done by adding the word OR is it
more common to change the name entirely?

"Nick Landau" <N.Landau@btopenworld.com> wrote:

I had never heard the term "amuletic name" previously but I see
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/GivenNames/slide10.html (although I know
what an amulet is).

from what I read I gather "Chia" would strictly be the amuletic name
meaning alive.
Marlene Bishow
President
Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
Rockville, MD
Researching:
KATZ, DEUTSCHER & NUSSBAUM in Zhuravno & Rozniatow, Galicia.
HANTMAN, GANTMAN and SINGER in Smilovichi and Koidanovo, BEL.
SHOMER, SOMMERS, SOHMER & KULPE in Lithuania

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