Re: Polish clandestine military organizations in WW II #general


Aida R. <atedege@...>
 

Yes, it all checks out.
In his book "Perpetrators Victims Bystanders" that I
mentioned earlier, Professor Raul Hilberg refers to
the context in which those clandestine organizations
operated, their motivations and their political
positioning, all of which immediately clarifies the
impossible *choices* open to those few Jews who could
and wanted to join an existing Polish fighting
organization in those terrible times:

1) the right-wing N.S.Z. (the national armed
forces)was hostile to both Nazis and Jews, and to
Bielorussians and Ukrainians as well

2) the centrist Armia Krajowa wasn't too ready to
accept into their ranks Jews that looked too 'Jewish',
spoke Polish badly, had no military training and
brought no weapons with them; they were considered a
liability

3) the small communist Armia Ludowa was impatient to
fight behind the lines and help the Red Army through
sabotage of German supply lines and in other ways, and
was more hospitable to Jews, especially if they were
communist Jews.

Professor Hilberg also explains that the centrist
Armia Krajowa

a) considered the communist Armia Ludowa to be
betraying the Polish cause

b) resented very much that some Jews suceeded in
joining -and implicitly reinforced- the Armia Ludowa.

In view of these 2 last points it doesn't stand to
reason that the AK 'absorbed' in any way this
communist formation.

Aida Rauch [Belgium]

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