Re: Meaning of "Cutter" as a job in 1888 NYC / I. Friedman Leather #general


Susan Steeble
 

Todd Edelman writes:
My cousin Ignatz Friedman's job listed on his naturalization papers in
1888 was "cutter". I know only that at least later the family owned a
leather business, "I. Friedman" in NYC.

Would "cutter" only have meant "meat cutter"?
In census records for the early 1900s, many of my family members were
employed as "cutters": clothing cutter, cutter of men's trousers,
cutter of ladies' suits, cutter of caps, cutter of neckties, scallop
cutter (of embroidery), cutter in a fur factory, etc. Obviously,
cutters would be employed in the leather business, too, to cut pieces
for making belts, handbags, and other leather goods.

Susan Steeble
Baltimore, MD

Researching:
FREEDHAND/FRIEDHAND/FRIEDGANT (Bershad > NY and CT, Romania, France)
KESSELMAN (Chorna/Krasni Okny > NY); KAHAN (Grodno > NY)
STUCHINSKY (Yurburg and Taurage)
SLUTSKY/SLOTE (Kiev > NY)
BODNAR (Mihaileni > Israel)
GELBER and SCHECHTER (Bucecea, Tirgu Neamt, and Iasi > Israel)

Join main@groups.jewishgen.org to automatically receive all group messages.