Re: Searching for my Grandfather's birth records #general


A. E. Jordan
 

From: Scott Ehrlich <scott@...>
Any other ideas of where his birth may have been recorded, outside of
census records which are not official for this purpose and are only 10
years at a time?
This is a common problem in New York City too. They estimate a quarter
or more of all births went unrecorded in the early 1900s/late 1800s.

Besides the obvious using alternate spellings and widening the search
parameters the next thing is to look for delayed reporting. At least
in New York we have files of people who later in life filed for birth
certificates. They are separate files >from the original birth records
and show up with a letter S or D in the indexes. Most common was for
school or the military or a passport they filed for a copy of the birth
certificate.

Checking any military records is a good place to see he person recorded
their birth date or their Social Security application. I do not know
when Social Security started but in modern days you need to show your
birth certificate to file for Social Security. Now I think babies
actually get there number when they are born.

Passport applications would be another good place to look for a person
swearing to their details of birth. Of course that is only if they
traveled overseas and got a passport.

Otherwise it is very possible for a person to go about their life
without ever needing to prove the details of their birth.

Allan Jordan

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