Re: Options for proof of birth date #general


Lisa Lepore
 

These messages also remind me of a story in my family. One story we always heard
growing up was that my great grandfather and his friend each had a child born on
the same day. As the story was told to us, the 2 fathers were waiting together for
the births of their children. They were very happy of course, and went out
celebrating after they got the news. Well, eventually I got around to looking up
her date of birth and found that she was recorded on one day, and my grandfather
the next.

My grandfather's name was terribly messed up. He was recorded as a girl, so the
date could be wrong as well. They had the same doctor, so maybe he was confused by
the time he recorded the births? I guess I'll never know for sure.

Since any of these records can be wrong, I would probably choose the date on the
draft registration or marriage record since these are the dates the person would
have likely sed himself, and make some notations about the lack of an actual
record.

Lisa
lisa.lepore2@gmail.com
#110233
Mendon, MA

From: Stephen L Snyder cat2steve@verizon.net
This happened with my grandfather, Ben SNYDER. He was born in Baltimore
in October 1888, but there is a one month gap in the birth certificates, and
since he was born within that gap, he wasn't able to get one when he applied for
a passport in 1960.
From: Trudy Barchcousintrudy@comcast.net In the early 1900s in the USA
most babies were born at home and did not have a birth certificate. In
lieu of no birth certificate which secondary document would be best
accepted for a birth date?

Join main@groups.jewishgen.org to automatically receive all group messages.