(US-NYC) FamilySearch Releases 1890 New York City Police Census #general


Jan Meisels Allen
 

Those with New York City roots will enjoy the recently released index of the
1890 New York City Policy Census on FamilySearch. The release includes 87
percent of the people recorded in the census. The index covers the 894 of
the original 1008 volumes as 114 volumes have been lost. It includes
1,479,855 names in the census. This is especially important as the 1890
Federal Census was destroyed and this can be used for genealogical research
in place of the destroyed census-albeit with less information.

It is called the "Police Census" as the police acted as enumerators. New
York City government did not believe that all of the city's inhabitants had
been enumerated in the 1890 federal census. The census capture an
additional 13 percent of New York City residents. What is included are name,
gender, age, assembly district, and election district.

To search the index go to:
https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2381996. There are no images of
the actual records. To see the actual census you will need to go to a
library or Family History Center that has the collection. The information
on the FamilySearch index includes the Family History Library microfilm number.

FamilySearch wiki has helpful information on how to search and what you will
find on this new digitized collection. See;
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/New_York,_New_York_City,_Police_Census,_1890_(FamilySearch_Historical_Records)
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/zcl486m )
Access to the index and all records on FamilySearch are free.

Remember that New York City was not consolidated until 1898. Therefore, not
all 5 boroughs as we know them today are included in the 1890 census. In
1890 it was Manhattan and most of the Bronx as we know it today. In 1898 the
east Bronx, Kings County (Brooklyn), Queens and Richmond (Staten Island)
consolidated with Manhattan and the Bronx to form The City of New York.
(See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_of_Greater_New_York)

Thank you to the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society Blog for
informing us of this new digitized resource

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

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