Re: Have you heard of Polanyu? #general


tom
 

Just one small correction: the term "dayan" means judge, almost certainly a
rabbi and member of a beth din (rabbinic court). And as a surname, it indicates
only that they are descended >from one, as the job is not considered hereditary
(even though sons often did follow in their father's footsteps).

A Kohen (priestly caste descended >from Aaron, who served in the temple in
Jerusalem) is not allowed to enter a cemetery, but there is no such restriction
on rabbis (otherwise they wouldn't be able to officiate at funerals). You will
probably also find that their Hebrew name includes "haKohen" at the end.

Entering a cemetery has nothing to do with being a "dayan".

....... tom klein, toronto

<Susan Gordon> Sjgwed@aol.com wrote:
Thanks to members' input and replies, I have reluctantly concluded that
"Polanyu" refers, simply, to Poland, and nothing more specific. In addition,
the family's "original" last name, "Dayan," is also very broad. In a letter
to one of his cousins, he did recall being a small boy waiting with his
father *outside the gates of a cemetery* in NYC, during a family funeral
because they could not enter. This makes sense, if they were "dayans."

Join main@groups.jewishgen.org to automatically receive all group messages.