Re: bessarabia digest: December 13, 2013 #bessarabia


henry seigel <sigmundtrav@...>
 

Interesting question. >from my research on my family most of whom left Lipkani around 1885
with one elder sister coming in 1890, the men all seemed to speak Russian and Yiddish (so
reported by 2nd cousin in CA who came with bulk of family), but my own grandmother,
according to my late father, spoke Romanian and Yiddish, not Russian. I theorize that since
the men were much more involved in the OFFICIAL outside world and would definitely be
subject to service in the Tsar's army, that they were required (forced ?) to speak Russian,
the lingua franca of Russia, but that the women, engaging outside the house mostly in
market economy didn't learn it as they interacted with the locals who still, even after the
transfer of Ottoman Romanian lands to Russia, spoke their own language.

HENRY A. SEIGEL
Philadelphia PA.

-----Original Message-----
From: Bessarabia SIG digest <bessarabia@lyris.jewishgen.org
Sent: Dec 14, 2013 2:04 AM
To: bessarabia digest recipients <bessarabia@lyris.jewishgen.org
Subject: Languages in Moldova and Moldovia

From: Anna Reuter <anna94306@yahoo.com
Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2013 07:06:22 -0800 (PST)

Hi Yefim:
…….. Could you also give us your take on the languages used in the two regions over that 200
year period? Among and between Jews,  Yiddish (German Dialect) would
be spoken, of course. And if they were literate,  they would write Yiddish with
Hebrew letters. 

How about the divide between Romania and Bessarabia  (when it was part of the
Russian Empire)? My father, born in Bessarabia in 1905, claimed to speak Russian
in addition to Yiddish.   But Bessarabia was closer to Ukraine.  Would his version
of Russian with the Cyrillic Alphabet be more similar to Ukrainian?
Ukrainian and Russian Languages share some commonality with Cyrillic letters,
but there are differences.

Then there is Romania and/or the Moldavia Principality. They would speak
Romanian, of course, and use  a Latin Alphabet but with 31 letters.
Romanian is a Romance Language with roots in Latin.
Please correct me if I did not get this right.

Thanks,

Anna Reuter
Palo Alto, California

Join main@groups.jewishgen.org to automatically receive all group messages.