Re: Visiting Poland #poland


Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

Hi,

Zamenhofa Street is still there. In fact one of the major hotels in
Bialystok the Braniki is at 25 Zamenhofa but it may be that the current
numbering system doesn't correspond well at all to what it was in 1941.
As you may know Zamenhofa is named for Ludwik Zamenhof the creator of
the artificial language Esparanto. As I remember his home is on the
corner of Biala Street. It's somewhat of a tourist site that you can
visit. This neighborhood was one of the old Jewish neighborhoods and
was probably best known for the presence of the rather impressive Choral
Synagogue. It was also sometimes called the Zabludowski synagogue. This
synagogue was built by Zamenhof's father I think in the mid 1800's, and
it was burned during the destruction of the Ghetto in 1943. Zamenhof
Street will be easy to find.

To find out specifically what happened to your family in Bialystok
during the Shoa may not be possible. I quickly looked for the name on
various things that I have but didn't find it. There where very many
ways and very many places in which Bialystoker Jews suffered and met
their fate during the Shoa. So there are many possibilities. There do
not appear to be very extensive lists or records that help us learn the
fate of specific Bialystoker Jews. Most of this is lost forever. Most
Jews >from Bialystok who ended up deported to death camps went to
Treblinka, Auschwitz, or Majdanek, in that order. There were also some
pretty extensive mass killings that were carried out locally in or near
the Ghetto >from June of 1941 to August of 1943. Many of the "Thursday"
victims came >from the area of Zamenhof street. This took place on
Thursday July 3rd 1943. Men >from the age about 16-60 were taken by the
Germans >from their homes and there was a "selection". Several hundred
were taken to the edge of town to Pietrasze field and killed there.
Unlike Warsaw for instance not as many died in Bialystok within the
ghetto of starvation and disease. I will keep a look out for the name
Walicki, and will email you if I find anything.

Tilford Bartman, www.zabludow.com


Batya Dashefsky wrote:


I will be visiting Poland in 9 months and am specifically trying to
find out what happened to my family who were living in Bialystok in
1941.

I have an address and I think a last name- Walicki, 27 Zamenhofa.
If anyone is familiar with the city and can point me in the right
direction I would appreciate it.

Thanks

Batya Dashefsky
Jerusalem

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