Re: Name Changes before emigration from Ukraine... #ukraine


Jeff Knisbacher <jknisbac@...>
 

David,
Sorry for the late reply. I've been away for most of the last 5 weeks.
Interestingly our TISSENBAUM family was largely standardized to that
spelling here in the US. In Bedford, England, however, the more
Yiddish/Russian sounding TISINBOM was maintained. I do think that German
spelling was more prestigious over here, but am not sure about the
perception in Britain.

Jeff Knisbacher, Baltimore area

----- Original Message -----
From: David Goldman <davic@pop.erols.com>
To: Ukraine SIG <ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2000 9:37 AM
Subject: Name Changes before emigration >from Ukraine...


In my research, it has come to my attention that my great-grandfather,
Elyokum Zvi GROBERMAN, had the original last name of KRASINSKY before the
family left Ukraine for Manchester England in 1891. Evidently, GRUBERMAN
(which later became GROBERMAN)was the last name of a relative. >from what I
understand, Jews specifically wanted to switch their last names from
Russian-sounding ones to German-sounding ones at a time when Britain and
Germany were allies against Russia. How frequent did this situation occur,
and do others have this tradition also about German and Russian-sounding
names?

David Goldman

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