Re: 64 out of 67 Marker Match #dna


Barry S. Finkel
 

On Sat, 16 Aug 2014 18:27:14 +0300 Michael Waas <mwaas1989@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

My father recently did DNA testing through FamilyTreeDNA. I would like
to better understand what a 64/67 Y marker match means on FTDNA. For
the sake of full disclosure, the markers which were different DYS454
(1-step mutation), DYS576 (1-step), and DYS570 (1-step). As I
understand it, it indicates the high probability of our common
ancestor being within the past 400-600 years.

Thanks for your help and information, I want to be able to explain it
to my father's match, and what it indicates of our
genealogical/genetic relationship. And just so it is also clear, my
father's family, the paper trail takes us to the end of the 17th
century in Amsterdam and his match, the paper trail takes him to early
19th century Sephardic Aleppo.

Best,

Michael Waas
Haifa, Israel
Michael, I am not sure that I can answer your query successfully.
I can explain what I have learned >from my FTDNA Y-67 (and Y-12, Y-25,
and Y-37) tests. What haplogroup are you? What does the haplogroup
predictor - http://www.hprg.com/hapest5/ - show?

My haplogroup is G2b1 (formerly G2c, before the recent renumbering).
This haplogroup is historically placed in 1490 Sicily. In 1490
Sicily was controlled by Spain, and all of the Jews would have had to
emigrate >from Sicily or convert to Roman Catholic. I have produced
a Tip file for each of my matches (for each of the four tests). In my
67-marker matches file I have these entries for the first and last
match in each category (minus the names, SNP, and STR values):

---
In our tree, we have 12 generations in one branch, and the top of that
branch is ca. 1650. That means that 12 generations is 350 years, and
24 generations is 700 years (ca. 1300).

In comparing 67 markers, the probability that BSF and someone with M
mismatches shared a common ancestor with the last G generations is:

Approx Yr 1883 1766 1650 1533 1416 1300 1184

M ## 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 Lastname
- -- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ------ ------ --------
67-0 0
--------------------------------------------------------
67-1 2 69.74 94.43 99.12 99.87 99.98 100.00 .
67-1 2 69.74 94.43 99.12 99.87 99.98 100.00 100.00
--------------------------------------------------------
67-2 2 45.89 85.22 96.98 99.47 99.92 99.97 100.00
67-2 2 44.22 83.96 96.53 99.35 99.89 99.97 .
--------------------------------------------------------
67-3 7 46.65 85.76 97.17 99.52 99.93 99.99 100.00
67-3 7 22.32 66.70 90.09 97.61 99.49 99.90 99.98
--------------------------------------------------------
67-4 17 24.83 70.31 92.00 98.26 99.67 99.94 99.99
67-4 17 3.87 26.88 57.69 80.05 91.86 97.01 .
--------------------------------------------------------
67-5 32 24.81 70.29 91.98 98.26 99.67 99.94 99.99
67-5 32 3.04 27.61 61.12 84.91 95.04 98.58 99.63
--------------------------------------------------------
67-6 54 9.66 47.87 79.78 93.93 98.46 99.65 99.93
67-6 54 .00 .37 4.75 19.08 41.86 64.79 .
--------------------------------------------------------
67-7 53 3.58 30.69 65.96 87.43 96.20 99.00 99.76
67-7 53 .00 0.28 3.78 16.01 38.86 59.46 .
--------------------------------------------------------

The percentages vary in the same number of mismatches based on which
markers mismatch. A difference of two in one marker is counted as
two mismatches.
---

Note that in the past, the Tip report used to contain 28-generation
percentages; now the report does not contain those. You can see that
with differences up through 5, at 24 generations I have almost a
100% expectation that these persons are related to me. But I can
trace my paternal ancestry back to around 1790 in Opole-Lubelskie, in
present-day Poland. In 1790, families did not have family names, and
Napoleon had not yet decreed that civil records had to be kept by the
government. The 1790 date is calculated to about 20 years before the
approximate birth year of my gggfather, and that date I got from
records that the LDS microfilmed in 1954. Assuming that I really am a
G2b1 (and I have not had a full sequencing of my Y-DNA to see if I
really have the one-letter mutation that officially defines the G2b1
haplogroup), I have no way of tracing my paternal ancestry from
1790 Opole-Lubelskie back to 1490 Sicily. So, in summary, I have
a huge number of persons who are probably related to me, but I have no
way of taking my tree back far enough to find a common ancestor.

I had created the match file for Y-67 and Y-37, and in the past few
weeks I created match files for Y-12 and Y-25. I can tell >from the
files if two persons are really closely related, because they have
the same percentages. The two persons who are one marker different
from me have the same last name, so I know that they are more closely
related than 12 or 16 generations.

The Athey predictor site says that my Y-12 STR values show that
I am with 100% certainty a G2b1. But I do not know the sample size
used by Athey to calculate his results. I have not had my sample
checked for Y-111 STR values, as it would not tell me anything that
I do not already know.

You might learn something by creating a Y-67 Tip report, as I did.

--Barry S. Finkel
Chicago

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