Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia six Galician regional maps 1804~1919 on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia


Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

We've just posted to the Gesher Galicia Map Room six (!) historical
maps of Galicia, dating >from 1804 to 1919 and documenting the
evolution of the province >from several perspectives.

Liechtenstern Map of the Two Galicias 1804
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-liechtenstern-1804/
Reisser Map of East and West Galicia 1805
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-reisser-1805/
These first two maps were made during the brief life of West Galicia
as an Austrian province, before it was lost to the Duchy of Warsaw
and then to Congress Poland. West Galicia was a large territory which
began on the eastern outskirts of Warsaw and covered much of what
is today eastern Poland, including Lublin and Radom. If you had
family in this region around the turn of the 19th century, they were
part of New Galicia.

Marieni Map of Galicia & Lodomeria 1833
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-lodomeria-marieni-1833/
Created for an Italian atlas set, this map was adpated >from a
Viennese original and partly translated into Italian >from the
Polish- and German-language town and district names. In addition
to showing boundaries and the head towns of both political and
religious administrations, the partial translations result in some
interesting language mash-ups such as "Vecchio Miasto" and "Nuovo
Sandec".

Weiland Map of Galicia and Bukovina 1832
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-weiland-1832/
Raffelsperger Map of Galicia and Bukovina 1846
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-bukovina-raffelsperger-1846/
European map-making in the first half of the 19th century focused
on geographic accuracy and clarity. These maps are excellent
examples of the art and science of cartography in Germany and
Austria in years of delicate political stability, before mid-century
European revolutions forced an internal review and adjustment of
imperial authority, and an expansion of autonomy in Galicia. Both of
these maps document the historical area and the population of
Galicia, at just under 5 million people of very mixed cultures.

Malopolska and Bukovina Map 1919
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/galicia/galicia-malopolska-1919/
World War I ripped Europe apart, and the reassembly was slow and
painful. This map by an unknown author describes the district
borders of "Little Poland" even while the ownership of former Galicia
was still in military and diplomatic dispute between Poland and
Ukraine. Although several international councils would eventually
award Galicia to Poland, it would not be long before an even larger
war would tear all of this apart again.

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Map Room Coordinator
Warsaw, Poland
maps@geshergalicia.org

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