JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom FW: Dutch customs, language and Grimslech #unitedkingdom


Peloni
 

My maternal Dutch ancestry reached England sometime in the 1700=92s and =
the
grimslech of my youth served by my mother during the whole of Pesach =
have
never been surpassed.
All the customs were Ashkenazi except for the =
singing
of two of the songs at Leil Seder in the language described in Mr =
Bernet's
message as Juedisch-Deutsch (Judaeo-German), termed "Western Yiddish" by
scholars, printed in my grand father's (Deyong) Haggadah published by
D.Cohen 256 Whitechapel Road in 5656 (1896) and one printed in 5643 =
(1883)
by Ann Abrahams & Son in commercial Street. It also appears in one =
printed
by P. Valentine in 6638 (1878) by Rev. A.P. Mendes.

However an edition published in London in 1897 with revision of the =
Hebrew
Text according to a MS written in the year A.M. 5574 by the celebrated
Grammarian Rabbi Shabsi Sofer of Przemslow also a valuable commentary =
copied
from a MS. Of the well known Rabbi Jonathan Eybeshuetz, both of which
manuscripts belong to the Beth Hamedrash of the United =
Synagogue
published by Jacob Dickinson of 5 Sandys Row does not include the
Judaeo-German versions. Presumably the Anglo Jewry of the United =
Synagogue
did not care to recognize them?! If any one would like a copy of =
these two
songs please contact me directly.

If food is an indication of ancestry via recipes, can any one elaborate =
on
the Dutch minhag of only keeping one hour between meat and milk? I =
know the
halachic source. However, it seemed in England a large number of the
Anglo-Jewry communities kept three hours and I wonder where this minhag
originated.
Six hours is the normally accepted time between meat and =
milk.
Did this serve to differentiate between the Sefardim and the =
Askenazim who
came into England >from Holland?

Noach miTelshestone
Kiryat Telshestone
D N Harei Yehudah
Israel

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