JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Puzzles from the Arolsen records #general


Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

The question that was posted which in part read: "How did people prove
their identity in the 18th century when they moved to other countries...?"
made me decide to ask if any of you might have a possible solution to a
recently revealed conundrum.

A couple of weeks ago I was examining the Arolsen records at Yad Vashem.
The list is more or less alphabetical, enabling me to look up some of my
unique family names without prior knowledge of who these individuals were.
The families all originate in Germany.

There has never been a LEFOR or a LEVOR that I could not connect to the
family tree. And yet, there in the records I found a Martin LEFOR b. 15
May 1913 whose birthplace was marked Serbia/Yougoslavia. There were two
French LEFORs who were political prisoners and not marked as being
persecuted because they were Jews.

Another unique name is HIMMELREICH. For what reason could some people in
this family have been arrested in "Aktion 'Gittel'", sent to Buchenwald and
then released within the next few days? Some of them somehow took on
Latvian nationality, or Dutch, or Youglavian, or it said they were born in
Ramuciai, Lithuania and they had Latvian nationality or conversely it said
they were born in Riga and had Lithuanian nationality. Could all of this
been a desperate attempt to escape the Nazis and the information fabricated
as they went along? What would the fabrications have helped anyway?

I found a listing for the arrest of a citizen of New York City, Louise
LEVOR, who was my great grandmother. There was only one Louise LEVOR in
New York City and she was never put into a concentration camp.
Unfortunately, the only card there was the arrest card, so I don't know
what became of this person. All of this left me with my head spinning.
Can anyone offer any plausible explanations for all these puzzles?

Many thanks in advance! Martha

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