Two replies Re: [GerSIG] 3 Dutch sisters with the same given name ??? #germany


hennynow
 

Hi, Werner,

That is indeed a curious case. The only explanation I can give is that
the sisters were named for 2 grandmothers who were both "Marianne."

My Hebrew name is Chaija. I was named after both my paternal
grandmothers: Chaija Gittel Moëd-Seiner and Chaija Jawitz-Aronowitz, but
then I was the last child of my parents....

Henriette Moëd Roth Los Angeles, CA hennynow@...
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I don't know for sure about Holland, but in Germany, particularly in
areas under Napoleon, there were limited choices of given names legally
available, so Jews would choose a name >from the list for a secular
name, but at home they used a typical Jewish name. For example, one
ancestor of mine registered his name as Zecharias in Worms, but on his
headstone the name given is Yissochar. (See also the next to last
paragraph here: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Rheinphalz/rhe003.html).
Thus it's possible that the sisters had different Jewish names, although
they had identical secular names.

David Shapiro, Jerusalem dshapiro@...

Werner L. Frank, Thousand Oaks CA wlfrank82@... wrote:
The official Dutch nineteenth century records of one Jewish family
show three daughters, all with same given name of Marianne. The first
daughter passed away within two years of birth. The second Marianne
was born shortly thereafter....certainly an acceptable naming practice
in those days. However, there is a third daughter, born two years
after the second, that also is given the same name which seems highly
suspect.
A confirmation of this seeming curious practice are the marriage
records of the two sisters wherein the parents names are identical.
Can anyone explain this anomaly.

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