Re: SCHREINER - Drohobycz, Borislav, Stanislawow #galicia


Marx, Jonathan Schreiner <John@...>
 

Dear Group:

I could not follow everything in Mr. Sharon's post about my family. However,
I do know that my branch went up into Russia in the 19th century. There is
simply doubt whether it was Hirsch Schreiner or not. My Great-Grandfather
was born around the time of the petroleum discovery, and died in 1912. Not
much is made of the incident in the family. My grandfather, Jacob, came over
to the US with his brother in order to keep him >from going into the Czar's
army. (They actually boarded ship at Liverpool on April 15 when news just
came over the Titanic sank. My grandfather remembered everybody was scared
to board ship, because they would be in steerage and they knew they didn't
have a chance if the boat sank). My grandmother would follow with his
parents. My great-grandfather then died, and they got a refund for his
ticket.

The name was indeed known as Shtrejner or Strejner in Russia. Why, I do not
know. Perhaps nuances to Cyrillic. At any event, I have the passport when
they left. It does read Schreiner in Cyrillic. Yet sometimes I know they
were called Shtreiner. Dr. Beider confirms this is "Schreiner" in his
Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from the Russian Empire.

My grandfather traveled most everywhere, as a driver for the aristocracy. He
spoke German, Yiddish, Russian, French, Polish, Arabic, Ukrainian, and even
enough Chinese to get by. We have no idea where all he traveled, but he was
brilliant with picking up languages. If he was in places where Jews were not
supposed to be, he was clever enough to say he was Polish (his accent would
have been too strongly Yiddish to pass for German.)

The Pale was a leaky thing at best. I know that in certain German villages
along the Volga the town doctor (as in the case of Norka) was Jewish. My
great-grandfather might have said he was Polish or something to get into St.
Petersburg or was perhaps invited. He was an excellent shtieval macher (boot
maker). This is not a cobbler. These are the great Russian boots, also those
used in the cavalry.

In any case, Yitsaksohns were also related, and I noticed on Jewishgen that
someobdy else is seeking information on Isaacson in St. Petersburg. But,
alas, their email is no longer valid.

I'm sorry to hear that Yoske Schreiner was in a labor camp, but I feared
they were all wiped out. He could be Isak or Chaim's son.

Again, if anybody is of the family of the Borislav, Drohobycz, Stanislawow
Shcreiners, and any Jewish Schreiners in Poland, I would like to hear from
you. There were many Schreiners. It was a large family, as even Jewishgen
testifies. Also, any Yitsaksohns who have heard they have Schreiner
relatives. Names that stick out are Sarah and Elizabeth Isaacson

Thanks,

Jonathan Schreiner Marx
Respond to dom@cwo.com

From: "Alexander Sharon" <a.sharon@shaw.ca> in part:

I've read with the great interest Jonathan's story about the Schreiners,
especially since he made reference to my old post about the stealing by
Polish pharmacist Ignacy Lukasiewicz Abraham Schreiner's inventions of the
crude oil distillation and the kerosene lamp.
-snip-

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