1877~1881 Lwow Birth Record Form-Cyrillic #galicia


Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Regarding the question Mark Halpern posed recently:

<<Lwow researcher Feige Stern has posted three Lwow birth records to
ViewMate. They are:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6138
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6139
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=6140

I have personally never seen this exact form. The headings of the form are
the normal Polish and German ones, but there is an third Cyrillic language.
Can anyone tell me what language this is and why a third language is
included here. My understanding is that the Austrian Government required
only Polish and German and that the record itself had to be recorded in one
of these two languages.

Thanks for any thought you may have about this.>>

Here are some answers I've gathered >from two native speakers of Ukrainian
and Russian:

This Cyrillic writing represents some sort of official language: an
"absolutely awful mixture of mainly
Ukrainian with a little Russian additions." It was used in the
Austrian-Hungarian Empire primarily for documents, but is absolutely NOT a
"living" language. This "language" was even used in Czechoslovakia (court,
notary's office etc) until the World War II.

An example of what is found in this text: in the heading of column 7, the
fourth word (split between 2 lines) is "Matepbl," which in the Latin script
is "Mater" and the last two letters are not really letters at all, but
rather a "hard sound" sign. This sign doesn't exist in Ukrainian, but does
in Russian. Both languages use the opposite "soft sound" sign, b, like our
lowercase b (called a mee-yak-ees-nok).

Although Galician metrical records were usually written in Latin, Polish and
German, in the middle of the 19th century, as nationalism began to take
shape, one could see more Polish and Ukrainian in these records. It's
interesting to think of an empire that encompassed so many different
countries and nationalities trying to balance the different languages used
by the populace against their own political interests...which eventually
resulted in this hodgepodge compendium of Ukrainian and Russian officialese,
showing up in these Lvov records posted to Viewmate.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com

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