Re: Question re Polish parents' anglicised names on 1896 UK Naturalization Certificate #poland #unitedkingdom


Andy Monat
 

I too have seen records in New York where parents who presumably never left Europe were given anglicized names. Most of the times when the first name of a non-immigrant ancestor was anglicized, it turned out to be the name that was used by a descendant in the US. So for instance, the father Zalman Rivlin was listed as Samuel Rivlin, the same as his two grandsons went by in English; but the grandsons' Hebrew names were Zalman. (That case was especially confusing, because the father Zalman/"Samuel" Rivlin had a son Shlomo/Samuel Rivlin, thus leading to three consecutive generations who were all listed as Samuel!)

I even found one case where a mother was listed on one daughter's death record as Bessie, and that was crossed out and replaced with a typewritten name Sarah Minnie Maisen. A year later, the other daughter's death record gave the mother's name as Bessie, with no surname listed. The mother (Bessie or Sarah Minnie) had two granddaughters, one named Bessie/Betsy (and Bashe in an immigration record), the other named Sarah Minnie. So the descendants were pretty sure that one of those two granddaughters had been named for the grandmother, they just weren't in agreement on which one.

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