Re: Father and son with same given name.i have xome across #belarus #poland #general


Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

A couple of other possibilities I have myself encountered:

1. A simple clerical error in which the officiating clerk erroneously repeated the father’s name as the son’s (or vice versa). The father and witnesses didn’t necessarily (maybe couldn’t) read through the document to check its accuracy. I have seen that a couple of times. Usually you’ll be able to clear that up if you can find the son’s marriage or death record, or the father’s death record, or sometimes even the BMD records of any siblings. 

2. Similar looking names that may be misread if not written clearly and looked at carefully, but that are not in fact the same name, e.g. Srul and Szmul, Szlama and Szulim, Ber and Berek, Gersz (in Russian documents standing in for Hersz) and Gerszon, Icek and Josek, Nuchim and Nachman, are all names I have personally seen mistakenly indexed/transcribed as each other. So take a good look at the original documents to see if that may be the situation.

As you noted, Ashkenazi Jews in late 19th century/early 20th century Poland/Russia would not have named a son the same name as his father, unless the father had died. 

Best of luck,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.

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