Re: accessing US census by address #usa #general


Russ Maurer
 

I can't improve on the suggestions for the 1905 state census - you have to find the enumeration district.

But for the federal censuses, if you are an ancestry.com user, navigating to the census listing for a specific street is easy, and you can even navigate to a specific address in the 1900, 1920, and 1940 censuses (and 1930, with a little luck). No need for Steve Morse (much as I love him), two-step, finding the enumeration district, browsing through lots of pages, etc.

HOW?

To navigate to a specific street, just enter the street name in the keyword field of the All Collections search form or the Census & Voter List search form, e.g., "halsey street". Make it exact. The quotes are not required, but they help. If you omit them, or omit street, the search will also return records of people named Halsey. You need to know how the street was indexed and may have to try several variations to hit the right one, e.g., "West 3rd street", "W. 3rd street", "West Third street", "W. 3 St." etc.

To go to a specific house number, you need to start over and select a census first. To do this, from the home page, first select "Census and Voter Lists" from the Search drop-down. Then, in the right side bar in the Narrow by Category box, click on US Federal Census Collection. Then scroll down below the search form to find the list of US censuses. Pick the one you want.

The reason for doing this is that each individual census has a custom search form, generally with many more options than the generic census search form. The 1900, 1920, and 1940 search forms include a field for the house number (you can continue to put the street name in the keyword field). Note that the indexing of house numbers in 1920 was rather indifferent. You will get many fewer hits than expected, but open one up and the other residents at the same address will be adjacent.

For 1930, where there is no house number field in the search form, you can try adding the house number to the keyword field. This works most effectively if the house number does not also occur as a year, an age, a family number, an enumeration district, an income, or any of the other numbers that appear on a census page.  For example "14 avenue" 4600 as the keyword (Kings county, New York) pulls up the residents of 4600 14th avenue very nicely.

The 1910 census is the only one of the 20thC censuses for which the house numbers were not indexed at all, and thus there is no option to navigate directly to a house number.

I have no connection to Ancestry.com.

Russ Maurer
Pepper Pike, OH

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