Finding WW l US Army Rosters #usa #announcements


Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

A resource for researching soldiers in World War l are the muster rolls and rosters at FamilySearch  See: https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/3378445?availability=Family%20History%20Library.

 

US WWI Muster Roster Rolls on FamilySearch

 

The records are not indexed so we have to do a bit of work.

 

You need to know the military organization(s) to which your ancestors belonged. A good start is using the VA Master Index to locating the first organization to which he was assigned. https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/2968245.   From there, following him in each roster, you might be able to trace his transfers between organizations.

 

To help with abbreviations on the discharge cards see: https://ncarchives.files.wordpress.com/2016/11/ncwwiservicecards_abbrvlist.pdf

 

It has been suggested to start with the VA Master Index, then search the Muster rolls and rosters at FamilySearch (see aforementioned URL) https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/3378445 . This collection contains an index to veterans who served at any time during World War I and who made (or whose heirs made) pension or benefits claims of the Veterans Administration between 1917 and 1940.

 

Another blog post may be of assistance:  https://aweekofgenealogy.com/did-my-ancestor-serve-in-wwi/

 

When you see the little camera icon on the right, that means there are digital images of the record to view on the website. Click on the camera to go to the filmstrip.

 

The first group of Muster Rolls are for the Headquarters Company.  You can double-click on an Image to go it. From there you can use the arrows to move forward and backward through the filmstrip images. If you want to go back to seeing the browse multiple images, click on the button in the navigation menu on the left with all the small boxes.

 

At the end of the Muster Roll, soldiers lost are listed.

 

If the military unit was disbanded then some historical research may be necessary to find out where the soldiers were transferred.

 

For more information read the blog post in A Week of Genealogy https://aweekofgenealogy.com/wwi-u-s-army-rosters-the-easy-way/

 

Thank you to Dr. Margaret McMahon, A Week of Genealogy for sharing this information on her blog.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

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