Re: Naturalisation - Women - Early 20th century #unitedkingdom


rv Kaplan
 

In my experience in Scotland, only a small minority of Jewish immigrants naturalised in the first place - and pre-WW1, mostly men.  If the husband naturalised, not sure what the advantage was for the wife to naturalise too.  It was an expensive process.  I presume naturalisation allowed men to vote, but women couldn't vote anyway at that time.
Would be interested in other theories.
Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland

 



Joyaa Antares joyaa@... via groups.jewishgen.org 

10:03 (1 minute ago)
to main

Hi All,

Please can someone explain why British naturalisation records for the early 20th century appear to be for men only.

Behind this question lies a second one: my great grandmother was born in Berlin in 1877.  By 1891 she was in the UK with her parents and only sibling, a brother.  She married a Polish-born man (my ggf) in Jan 1896 at the Great Synagogue in Duke's Place, Aldgate.  Her husband became a British natural subject in Feb 1902.  To the best of my imperfect knowledge, her parents did not naturalise.  Would great grandma automatically have renounced - or even been forced to renounce - her German citizenship by virtue of her husband's naturalisation?  

Thanks, Joyaa ANTARES

Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
___________________________
Researching ... KEMPNER in Berlin, Lodz, Warszawa and London
MOSES (often MANSELL) in London and South Africa
LEVY, BADER in Berlin, Schwerin, Friedeberg

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