Re: Deportation from U.S. ports back to Eastern Europe #general


Ellen
 

My grandfather went back to Russia around 1925, having emigrated to the U.S. in 1907.  Accompanying him was my grandmother, who he had married in 1922, and their infant son.  I can only imagine my grandmother's reaction to his decision; she had come to the U.S. only a few years earlier, delayed by WWI.   Apparently, my grandfather believed that conditions in Russia had improved after the Revolution.  It's possible that one of his brothers, a Bolshevik and government official, had written to him, though we do not have copies of any correspondence between them.    

In Russia, my grandmother enjoyed meeting her in-laws, but my grandfather must not have been happy with what he found, and he was not afraid to speak up.  Exactly what he said, I don't know.  Eventually, a neighbor warned my grandmother that there could be dire consequences if he continued to speak out.  Towards the end of 1926, the family boarded a ship in Rotterdam and headed back to New York.

Ellen  
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Researching WEISSMAN/VAYSMAN (Ostropol, Ukraine); MOROZ and ESTRIN/ESTERKIN (Shklov & Bykhov, Belarus); LESSER/LESZEROVITZ, MAIMAN, and BARNETT/BEINHART/BERNHART (Lithuania/Latvia); and ROSENSWEIG/ROSENZWEIG, KIRSCHEN, and SCHWARTZ (Botosani, Romania)

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