Ethical Responsibilities of Genealogical Organizations during the Global COVID-19 Pandemic #guidelines #education


YaleZuss@...
 

The situation is actually a lot more complicated than has been suggested:
 
The two vaccines approved so far are effective at preventing serious symptoms from SARS-CoV-2, but the medical community is still waiting to see whether people who have been vaccinated can still spread the virus.  
The answer will probably come from Israel, where every adult should be vaccinated by the end of February; if it does, there should be a dramatic drop-off in new cases there within the next few weeks. The effect in the US should be the same.  Other vaccine candidates still in the pipe-line may be better at stopping the virus from spreading.  If one emerges that can stop transmission, it should be used preferentially to the two currently being administered; people who have received the first two may have to get the new one as well.
  
If people who have been vaccinated can still transmit the virus, the next open question comes into play: How long does the protection offered by the vaccines last?  At the rate of vaccination envisioned by Pres. Biden, we will reach "herd immunity" no earlier than August, i.e., eight months after vaccinations began.  If the vaccine doesn't provide at least eight months protection, and doesn't stop transmission, we'll be little closer to the end of the pandemic in August than we are now; some fraction of the public will be protected from serious consequences at any one time, but that's it.  People who have not been vaccinated, and those whose vaccine protection has been lost will remain vulnerable.
 
Plans for any face-to-face meetings during the coming summer ought to consider that this August may be little different from last August from the perspective of the pandemic.
 
Sorry, but that is the reality.
 
Yale Zussman
 

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