Re: USCIS Documents #records


Howard Aronoff <howard6276@...>
 

RE: GRANDMOTHERS NATURALIZATION; this may be useful: https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1998/summer/women-and-naturalization-1.html

From above link:

New laws of the mid-1800s opened an era when a woman's ability to naturalize became dependent upon her marital status. The act of February 10, 1855, was designed to benefit immigrant women. Under that act, "[a]ny woman who is now or may hereafter be married to a citizen of the United States, and who might herself be lawfully naturalized, shall be deemed a citizen."

Later in the above link:

Happily, Congress was at work and on September 22, 1922, passed the Married Women's Act, also known as the Cable Act. This 1922 law finally gave each woman a nationality of her own. No marriage since that date has granted U.S. citizenship to any alien woman nor taken it from any U.S.-born women who married an alien eligible to naturalization.(11) Under the new law women became eligible to naturalize on (almost) the same terms as men. The only difference concerned those women whose husbands had already naturalized. If her husband was a citizen, the wife did not need to file a declaration of intention. She could initiate naturalization proceedings with a petition alone (one-paper naturalization). A woman whose husband remained an alien had to start at the beginning, with a declaration of intention. It is important to note that women who lost citizenship by marriage and regained it under Cable Act naturalization provisions could file in any naturalization court--regardless of her residence.(12)

Both of my Grandmothers were listed on my Grandfather's naturalization papers which were filed in 1915 and 1916. I believe that my Grandmothers never applied directly but that when my Grandfathers petitions were honored, they, as listed spouses, automatically became citizens. 

Howard Aronoff
Boynton Beach FL
howard6276@...

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