Re: Naming convention among Romanian Jews in the late 1800's / early 1900's #names


David Harrison <djh_119@...>
 

Jack

Certainly this also happened in The Netherlands.  I have a large slice of an ancestral tree in which a series of first cousins have the same given name with a ripple of third cousins all using the same given name.  I am very thankful that the Dutch do not have a once in ten years census, they have house books which are open for a whole decade and are cross reference between books showing where people have come from or went to.  This has given me a child who went to relations for several years and then returned (to make a new entry in that book)  Other information can be found on Birth Certificates, which if signed by the Postmaster or town Clerk instead of parents , indicates thar parents could not read, this was a requirement for signing such a document.

David Harrison
Birmingham, Great Britain


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of jack nathanson via groups.jewishgen.org <nathanson1947=yahoo.com@...>
Sent: 15 November 2021 21:52
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Naming convention among Romanian Jews in the late 1800's / early 1900's #names
 
In Romania, Jewish children were definitely named after deceased ancestors. My late father, Nathan (Nuta), born in Raducaneni in 1911, was named after his paternal grandfather, Nuta Tailic. As a matter of fact, the name "Nuta" was so common in the family that the family name was eventually changed from "Tailic" to "Natanzon".

Jack Nathanson,
Montreal,
nathanson1947@...

Join main@groups.jewishgen.org to automatically receive all group messages.