JewishGen Weekly News Nosh September 11, 2022 #JewishGenUpdates


Phil Goldfarb
 


The Weekly News Nosh

JewishGen Weekly E-Newsletter

Phil Goldfarb, Editor
September 11, 2022

The question of the week last week was “Why am I receiving two Weekly News Noshes?” The answer is that you are subscribed to both the JewishGen Discussion Group (JGDG) as well as to JewishGen.org. Some individuals are subscribed to one or to the other, and many are subscribed to both. These are separate mailing lists. I mail the News Nosh to the JGDG on Sunday, and it is mailed by JewishGen.org on Monday to their e-mail list. Unfortunately, at this time there is not a way to integrate the two. Also, with the JGDG, all posts are archived for future reference (have you checked out the JGDG archives of over 671,000+ messages dating back to 1998 for any genealogy help?) while e-mails coming out from JewishGen.org are not. Depending upon how you receive your JGDG, you will also see it included in the Daily Summary or the Full Featured Digest. The simple solution for now? Just hit the delete button as the content is the same!

Enjoy this week’s Nosh!

Regards,

Phil

pgoldfarb@...

 

  1. MyHeritage Accelerates Publication of Content, Adds 74 Collections with 130 Million Historical Records. The 130 million records are of many different types including birth, marriage, death, census, immigration, civil, military, newspapers, will and probate records. The new records come from many countries: the U.S., the U.K, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Finland, France, Italy, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Scotland, and Spain. Following this update, the total number of collections on MyHeritage has now climbed to 18.6 billion records. Read more in their blog: MyHeritage Accelerates Publication of Content, Adds 74 Collections with 130 Million Historical Records - MyHeritage Blog

 

  1. Another One Million Newspaper Pages Made Free by the British Newspaper Archive and the British Library. Together, the British Newspaper Archive and the British Library are committed to releasing a total of five million free pages over five years, which can be accessed online on the British Newspaper Archive website and on Findmypast. Read the full story from Dick Eastman’s EOGN:  https://eogn.com/page-18080/12907127

 

  1. Information for Jewish Genealogy Societies or anyone to use in starting a Jewish Genealogy library. Thanks to Michelle Sandler MLS, the Head of Libraries for the IAJGS and working with most of the experts in the Jewish Genealogy field, Michelle has compiled a list of critical books and steps needed, Library of Congress headings and classification numbers, as well as other information for help in starting a Jewish Genealogy Library. She also attached her 2022 IAJGS Presentation on the subject. To view go to: https://www.ocjgs.org/for-librarians.html  

 

  1. 5 Million Photos of Graves Now Available at Geneanet. Geneanet (based in France) has reached a milestone of 5 million photos of graves are now online. Many of these photos are taken in Europe although a few are from North America. The Geneanet approach is comparable to, but different from Find-a-Grave and others. At Geneanet, there is always at least one actual photo of a grave or monument in the database, so no copied lists, funeral home announcement scrapings, or blank entries. No one "owns" a grave record at Geneanet; gravestones are available for indexing by everyone, not just the photographer. Thanks to Dick Eastman and EOGN for this story: https://www.eogn.com/page-18080/12912397 Also, check out their “Save Our Graves Project” that you can participate in: Join the project "Save our Graves" - Geneanet

 

  1. Nowy Sącz Memorial Lists 12000 Jewish Names Nazis Deported to their Deaths; And Returned Cobblestones in Prague. A new memorial lists the names of 12,000 Jews from Nowy Sącz and its surroundings deported by the Germans to their deaths during the Holocaust. The Prague memorial constructed from hundreds of cobblestones that were cut from uprooted Jewish gravestones and used for paving in downtown Prague has also been dedicated at the Old Jewish Cemetery in Prague’s Žižkov district. Go to https://jewish-heritage-europe.eu/2022/09/11/poland-cz-memorials/ for the stories and to see the video. Thanks to Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee for this story.

 

  1. Polish Genealogical Society of America 2022 Virtual Conference- Sept 16 – 18. To read more and register go to: https://pgsa.org/product/2022-pgsa-virtual-conference/

 

  1. 17th-century Jewish woman’s diaries to be adapted into new graphic novel.  Glikl of Hamlyn's diary, written hundreds of years ago, describes issues, ambitions and struggles that remain relevant today. The Jewish woman whose 20-year diary describes life in medieval eastern Europe is being turned into a graphic novel by a husband-and-wife team of educators. Born in approximately 1646, she lived mostly in Hamburg, in today’s Germany. She is usually referred to as Glikl of Hamlyn, her husband’s hometown, which is also spelled Hamelin, famous for the story of the Pied Piper. Glikl lived well into her 80s and had 14 children, 12 of whom lived into adulthood. Read the story from the Jerusalem Post: 17th-century Jewish woman’s diaries to be adapted into new graphic novel - The Jerusalem Post (jpost.com)

 

  1. Revitalizing part of a small town’s Jewish History… Las Vegas, New Mexico. Nearly 700 miles east of the glitz and casinos of the Las Vegas strip lies another town with the same name: Las Vegas, New Mexico. It once boasted a large Jewish community and, in 1886, the Temple Montefiore opened its doors as the first Jewish place of worship in New Mexico Territory. The Jews of Las Vegas now have an opportunity to buy back the building and reclaim a vital part of their history. Read the interesting story: Las Vegas, N.M. Jewish community aims to buy back synagogue - Albuquerque Journal (abqjournal.com)  Thanks to JGDG member Mary Kinney for passing this story along to me.

 

  1. A labor of love: Meet the Rabbi who spent seven years translating the entire Chumash for Romania’s Jewish community…even though he moved away. Although there are several Romanian translations of the Hebrew Bible, this will be the first from a Jewish lens. “Tora si Haftarot,” which is both translated and transliterated into Romanian, was unveiled at a ceremony at Bucharest’s Choral Temple meant to celebrate both the book itself and the seven-year effort to bring it into the world. Read the story from JTA: This Romanian rabbi spent 7 years translating the Torah into Romanian — even though he moved away - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)

 

  1. Jamaica, Jews and Christopher Columbus: The Fascinating History of Jews in Jamaica.  Jamaica! Reggae music, Bob Marley, beaches, palm trees, Usain Bolt and… Jews. Jews!? Surprisingly, the Jewish connection to Jamaica is very old and very interesting. The first synagogue in Jamaica was built in the latter half of the 17th century, but was destroyed by an earthquake in 1692. Synagogues in Jamaica and the West Indies have a very unique feature: wooden floors covered with sand. .Read the full story from Aish: Jamaica, Jews and Christopher Columbus: The Fascinating History of Jews in Jamaica - aish.com

 

  1. He preserved Ukrainian Jewish culture — before, during and after the Shoah. In the late 1920s, ethnomusicologist Moyshe Beregovsky began traveling to Ukrainian Jewish villages equipped with a phonograph and wax cylinders. He was out to record wedding songs, klezmer anthems and lullabies. He couldn’t have known it at the time, but what he ended up documenting was a culture on the cusp of oblivion — and one that, against all odds, would continue a tradition of song. Read the story from the Forward: He preserved Ukrainian Jewish culture — before, during and after the Shoah – The Forward.

 

  1. Rare First Temple period ivories discovered in Jerusalem. Also found was a seal impression, some 2,700 years old, reading, “Natan-Melech servant of the king.” Archaeologists are describing as “extraordinary” the discovery of a collection of ivory plaques from the First Temple period recently unearthed in Jerusalem. They are among only a few ever found and the first to be unearthed in the city. Read the story from JNS: Rare First Temple period ivories discovered in Jerusalem - JNS.org

 

  1. Ancient Hebrew letter from First Temple period returned to Israel. The letter written in ancient Hebrew, originally found in the Judean Desert caves, ended up in Montana and was then returned to Israel. Archaeologists estimated that it dates back to the sixth century BCE which joins two other documents in this time period in the Israel Antiquities Authority Dead Sea Scrolls collection. Read the story from The Jerusalem Post: Ancient Hebrew letter from First Temple period returned to Israel - The Jerusalem Post (jpost.com)

 

  1. Saving the World's Synagogues from Destruction. The London-based Foundation for Jewish Heritage, exists to preserve Jewish architectural sites, monuments and places of cultural significance at risk worldwide. The Foundation, which started in 2015 has created an inventory of over 3,300 historic Jewish sites, many in urgent need of restoration. To read more see: https://www.brandeis.edu/jewish-experience/alumni-friends/2022/august/temples-preservation-history.html Thanks to Dick Eastman and EOGN for this story.

 

  1. This Holocaust survivor and Brazilian swimming champion is still competing at 98. Last month, at the Pan American Games in Medellin, Colombia, spectators, journalists and the event’s organizers lined up with anticipation along the side of a pool to watch a 400-meter medley. They were there to see Nora Tausz Ronai, who would finish the race — which involves breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly and freestyle — despite the fact that she is 98 years old. Read the inspiring story from JTA: This Holocaust survivor and Brazilian swimming champion is still competing at 98 - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)

 

  1. At Bergen-Belsen, an activist born in DP camp commemorates loss and life. One might not associate the term “concentration camp” with life. But that is exactly how Menachem Rosensaft views Bergen-Belsen. For it was here, in the displaced persons camp set up after World War II, that the longtime activist for Holocaust remembrance was born.  Read the story from JTA:  At Bergen-Belsen, an activist born in DP camp commemorates loss and life - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)

 

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