JewishGen Weekly News Nosh October 23, 2022 #JewishGenUpdates


Phil Goldfarb
 


The Weekly News Nosh

JewishGen Weekly E-Newsletter

Phil Goldfarb, Editor

Date: October 23, 2022

 

“A Family Without The Understanding Of Their Past History, Foundation And Ethnicity Is Like A Tree Without Roots”

 

                     Enjoy this week’s Nosh!

Regards,

Phil

pgoldfarb@... 

  1. The next free JewishGen Talks program titled: How to Utilize The JewishGen Discussion Group Effectively will be held this coming Wednesday, October 26, 2022, at 2:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time. As the Lead Moderator of the JGDG, I will actually be the presenter and you can register at: https://898a.blackbaudhosting.com/898a/JewishGen-Talks-How-to-Utilize-the-JewishGen-Discussion-Group-Effectively Come Zoom with me for an interesting, educational and fun program!

 

  1. 23andMe Adds Ancestry Composition Detail for People of Ashkenazi Ancestry. In the latest update to 23andMe’s Ancestry Reports and features, they added finer detail for customers with Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry allowing them to trace their family connections back to seven genetic groups corresponding to regions within Eastern and Central Europe. Read the full story from the 23andMe blog: 23andMe Adds Ancestry Composition Detail for People of Ashkenazi Ancestry - 23andMe Blog

 

  1. Revealed: Immigration Documents Filled Out by Austrian Jews During the Nazi Occupation. A trove of documents from Vienna’s Jewish community during the Anschluss period has been revealed to the public for the first time. The collection contains 228,250 records, including scanned original documents submitted by Jews hoping to emigrate from Vienna. These documents, available on the National Library of Israel’ website, provide extraordinary insights into the life of Vienna’s thriving Jewish community in the years 1938–1939. Read the story from the NLI blog: Revealed: Immigration Documents Filled Out by Austrian Jews During the Nazi Occupation (nli.org.il)

 

  1. MyHeritage Publishes 30 New Historical Record Collections and 31 Million Records in September 2022. The records are from the U.S., Australia, Belgium, Belarus, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Italy, Spain, the U.K, and Ukraine. They include birth, marriage, death, obituary, census, military, naturalization, immigration, voter, property, and will records. Read more from the MyHeritage blog: MyHeritage Publishes 30 New Historical Record Collections and 31 Million Records in September 2022 - MyHeritage Blog

 

  1. This would be the only national park telling the story of a Jewish American. A coalition of Blacks, Jews and others are lobbying for a new national park to honor the Rosenwald schools, which were founded by a son of German Jewish immigrants to serve rural Black communities in the Jim Crow era. Julius Rosenwald made a fortune investing in the Chicago-based Sears, Roebuck and Co. He ultimately bought out the company’s founders and turned the famed catalog business into a retail behemoth not unlike today’s Amazon. Rosenwald was inspired to create the schools after reading Booker T. Washington’s 1901 autobiography, “Up from Slavery,” and meeting with him. The schools are viewed as one of the most ambitious examples of Black-Jewish cooperation in U.S. history. Read the story: Create a National Park Preserving the Legacy of Julius Rosenwald · National Parks Conservation Association (npca.org)  

 

  1. United States Postal Service Celebrates Hanukkah With a New Stamp. Artwork Features an Original Wall Hanging of Abstract Hanukkiah Image. The U.S. Postal Service continues its tradition of celebrating Hanukkah, the joyous Jewish holiday also known as the Festival of Lights, with the issuance of a new Hanukkah Forever stamp. Read the story and see a picture of the new stamp at: USPS Celebrates Hanukkah With a New Stamp - Newsroom - About.usps.com

 

  1. From The “Did You Know Department”…That There are Two Jewish Sports Hall of Fame and Museums? One is The National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame and Museum in Commack, New York which is dedicated to honoring American Jewish figures who have distinguished themselves in sports. Read more about this one and view the inductees at: National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame and Museum - Wikipedia The other is The International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in Netanya, Israel. It honors Jewish athletes and their accomplishments from anywhere around the world. Read more about this one and view the inductees at: International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame - Wikipedia

 

  1. Jews On Film. Daniel Zana & Harry Ottensoser discuss films of all types to investigate what truly makes a film Jewish. Covering everything from Fiddler on the Roof to Uncut Gems, they finish each episode by ranking the film’s production, content, and themes on a scale of 1 to 5 Jewish stars. To listen each week, go to: Jews On Film on Apple Podcasts

 

  1. Ever hear of Ben Brill? The Dutch Jewish boxing champion sent to Nazi camps by Olympic team-mate. Brill was born in 1912. By the time he reached his 30s, his life had been transformed by invasion, violence and anti-Semitism. At the age of only 15 he was selected to fight for the Netherlands at the Amsterdam Olympics of 1928. Read more from BBC Sport: Ben Bril: The Dutch Jewish boxing champion sent to Nazi camps by Olympic team-mate - BBC Sport

 

  1. Jewish partisan who fought the Nazis battles to preserve forest fort where resistance group lived. Fania Brantsovsky, now 100, escaped the Vilna Ghetto to join 'Avenger' group - now she's fighting to save woodland camp so next generations can learn of their struggle. in 1943, 21-year-old Fania escaped from the Vilnius Ghetto through a gap in a wall and fled to a forest 12 miles away. For the next year, she lived with 100 other Jews in a wooden bunker deep in the woods, from where they launched attacks against the Nazis. Read the story from The Jewish Chronicle: Jewish partisan who fought the Nazis battles to preserve forest fort where resistance group lived - The Jewish Chronicle (thejc.com)

 

  1. Cora Wilburn, an early American Jewish novelist, gets a bridge named for her in her Massachusetts (U.S.) Town. A Massachusetts town at the center of a high school antisemitism scandal last year has just renamed a bridge in honor of a pioneering but little-known Jewish woman writer who lived there during the 19th century. Cora Wilburn, whose autobiographical novel “Cosella Wayne” is likely the first novel published in English by a Jewish woman in America, settled in Duxbury, south of Boston, as an adult and lived there under her death at age 82 in 1906. Read the story from JTA: Cora Wilburn, an early American Jewish novelist, gets a bridge named for her in her Mass. town - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)

 

  1. Patriotic Jews and the American Civil War. During the American Civil War, Jews served their country with steadfastness and valor. The American Civil War became the great crucible where the young country’s commitment to unity and equality were tested. For Jewish Americans, the war became a litmus test where they proved their loyalties to their countrymen. It also became the era where their loyalty was reciprocated. Jews served in high positions, displayed valor in battle, won awards, and, most importantly, were largely given equal opportunity and treatment to attain these feats. Read the story from Aish: Patriotic Jews and the American Civil War - aish.com

 

  1. Medal of German Olympian who defied Hitler in ’36 Games auctioned at nearly $500,000. Silver medalist Luz Long known as first to congratulate Black-American gold medal winner Jesse Owens, who previously said Nazi leader ‘must have gone crazy’ watching embrace. Long walked arm in arm through the stadium with Owens to celebrate their victories while Adolf Hitler watched from the stands.  Read the story from The Times of Israel: Medal of German Olympian who defied Hitler in '36 Games auctioned at nearly $500,000 | The Times of Israel

 

  1. A new klezmer tradition takes root in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park.  Known as the Brooklyn Klezmer Picnic in one corner of Brooklyn’s Prospect Park  in a lakeside area called the Peninsula, a group of like-minded musicians and listeners of all genders and ages, from places as far away as eastern Europe, France and England and as close as Park Slope and Crown Heights had come together to enjoy the weather, catch up and improvise klezmer music together. Read the story from JTA: A new klezmer tradition takes root in Brooklyn's Prospect Park - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org)

 

  1. Graffiti of knight from Middle Ages discovered in King David's Tomb. Israel Antiquities Authority researchers discovered an inscription bearing the name and family emblem of a Swiss noble who made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1466. A piece of graffiti bearing the name of Knight Adrian von Bubenberg along with his family emblem was discovered on the wall of King David's Tomb on Mount Zion, in Israel's capital of Jerusalem. Read the story from The Jerusalem Post: Graffiti of knight from Middle Ages discovered in King David's Tomb - The Jerusalem Post (jpost.com)

 

  1. Greek synagogue restored to its former glory after 82 years. Three-day celebration marks the return of the house of worship. A synagogue in Trikala, Greece that had fallen into disrepair was rededicated after being renovated. The Kahal Kadosh Yavanim synagogue had been dismantled in 1930 due to its poor condition. An estimated 87 percent of Greece’s Jews were killed during the Holocaust. Read the story from JNS: Greek synagogue restored to its former glory after 82 years - JNS.org

 

  1. A New Life for an Old Tradition. Wimpels have been used as ritual objects by German-speaking Jews for centuries, but these days in the U.S., the Torah binders have become part of new traditions in a wide variety of Jewish communities. The wimpel has now become a tool to teach children about Jewish lifecycle ceremonies and their families’ histories—including families who are not necessarily of Germanic descent—while strengthening intergenerational bonds. Read the story from Tablet Magazine: A New Life for an Old Tradition - Tablet Magazine

 

  1. In London exhibition, snapshots of Jewish life soon to be shattered by the Holocaust. The Wiener Holocaust Library’s display of Jewish refugee family photos, running through November 4, shows happy times – and dark clouds on the horizon. a powerful new exhibition, “’There was a time…’: Jewish Family Photographs Before 1939.”  The exhibition draws on Wiener’s archive of over 700 family papers collections — the largest related to Jewish refugees from Nazi Europe in the UK. Read the story and view some of the pictures from the Times of Israel: In London exhibition, snapshots of Jewish life soon to be shattered by the Holocaust | The Times of Israel

 

  1. Israel needs new burial solutions - what does Judaism say? In recent years, several activists looking to solve Israel's burial crisis have suggested restoring a method commonly used during the Second Temple period: likut atzamot. Over the next few decades, Israel will need to bury a few million corpses. According to some estimates, by the year 2100 roughly 10 million people will die in the country.  An interesting article from the Jerusalem Post: Israel needs new burial solutions - what does Judaism say? - The Jerusalem Post (jpost.com)

 

  1. Romania’s ornate and sometimes crumbling synagogues get new access via virtual tours. Stepping inside Romania’s Fabric Synagogue in real life would be a dangerous proposition: Closed since 1986, the ornate 1899 structure in the heart of the city of Timisoara is crumbling inside. The virtual tour is one of eight launched recently to give Jews — and non-Jews — the chance to immerse themselves in a world that is no more: that of the non-Orthodox Jewish communities that developed under the Habsburg Empire in the western part of today’s Romania. Read the story from JTA: Romania's ornate and sometimes crumbling synagogues get new access via virtual tours - Jewish Telegraphic Agency (jta.org) Editor’s Note: As I mentioned in the 7-31 News Nosh, Synagogues360 preserves unique historical legacies and presents them in 360-degree panoramic, interactive photos from 584 synagogues from 38 countries. Go to the website and explore: Synagogues360 | (anumuseum.org.il)

 

  1. On the Turkish-Syrian border, a city’s last Jews watch the ending of an epoch. Antakya, known in antiquity as Antioch, has a Jewish community 2,300 years old and is mentioned in the Talmud, but a flight to urban areas has left just a dozen Jewish residents. Jews have lived in the city of Antakya, known in ancient times as Antioch, for over 23 centuries. And the city wants visitors to know that. Read the story from the Times of Israel: On the Turkish-Syrian border, a city’s last Jews watch the ending of an epoch | The Times of Israel

 

  1. OCLC Webinar on How Internet archive Is Fulfilling ILL Requests at No Charge from Libraries that use Worldshare ILL. OCLC (Online Computer Library Center) is a nonprofit membership organization that promotes cooperation among libraries worldwide. More than 54,000 libraries in 109 countries use OCLC services to locate, acquire, catalog, lend and preserve print and electronic library materials. To read more about OCLC see: https://www.oclc.org/content/dam/oclc/reports/pdfs/studentperceptions_aboutoclc.pdf  There is a webinar on November 9  2:00 PM – 3:00 PM Eastern Standard Time to learn how Internet Archive is now quickly fulfilling Interlibrary Loan (ILL) requests for articles at no charge. Staff at Internet Archive (OCLC symbol: IAILL) supply articles fast—with an average turnaround time of 37 minutes on OCLC’s resource sharing network. While the webinar is free, it requires registration.  Go to: https://www.oclc.org/en/events/2022/requesting-articles-internet-archive-oclc-resource-sharing-network.html  to register. Thanks to Jan Meisels Allen Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee for this story.

 

  1. Polish town seeks to revive Jewish cemetery destroyed in WWII. Project by Poland’s Museum of the History of Polish Jews intends to collect fragments of Jewish gravestones, looted by locals for decoration and construction, and return them to original location. A new project in Opatow, a small town in Poland, is seeking to revive a Jewish cemetery destroyed in World War II. The location for years was one of the most important Jewish cemeteries in Poland. Read the story from Ynet news: Polish town seeks to revive Jewish cemetery destroyed in WWII (ynetnews.com)

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