Re: Hungarian Genetic Groups #hungary

Robert Neu
 

Have you looked up the characteristics of Haplogroup A777 ?
That would give you some clue. Here is one link and lists very broad genetic geographic
definitions. Remember that both Israel and Babylonia are in Asia though usually defined as Middle
East. Even some Jews >from Babylonia ended up in Hungary. There is also a so-calles "Khazar
theory".

http://www.geocities.com/refuting_kemp/gene_intro.html
A, B, F - these haplogroups represent about 23% of the Asian mtDNA

Go also to: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJHG/journal/issues/v70n5/013567/013567.html

This one is more verbose but does briefly indicate after Fig. 4 that some A mtdnas are "not" Asian
without more specifics.

If you have time "google" with "mtdna haplogroups" in the search

Also be aware that studies still rely on relatively small samples (a total of 69 when you get down
to all the entire A mtdna haplogroups in the last example.) Also these groupings are not talking
about "genealogical time frames of let us up to (generously) 3000 years , but rather so called
genetic time frames of 10 to 50,000 years.

Remember that any mt genetic markings can go back many generations, and that your haplogroup is
but a mutation >from a larger haplotype. Also Hungarian Jews have only been in Hungary at the
earliest >from the 1700's (about 12 generations at the most.). Also conversion >from none Jewish
mothers to Judaism were not "that" unusual.

Leslie Weinberg <lbw50@...> wrote:
Okay, can someone explain to me, having descended >from a Hungarian
speaking grandmother (great grandparents >from the same town) how I
wound up mtDNA Haplogroup A??? Leslie Weinberg

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