Re: Did husbands take wives last names ? #hungary


Beth Long
 

I have never seen a clear-cut case of this happening. However, as you know, surnames were generally adopted in NE Hungary about 1780. It's very difficult to know what the naming practices were prior to that; the "name decree" required that children take the name of their father (unless they were illegitimate, in which case the got the surname of their mother).

So what you essentially have is a population with unknown (but largely patronymic) naming practices being required to use at paternal surname-based system by the civil authority.

I should think that tombstones might provide some clues as to specifically Jewish (as aopposed to civil) naming practices. Do women as well as men have their father's names written on the stones?

One curious sidebar to this is that I was recently going through Satoraljaujhely (civil) marriage records >from the period 1900-1920, and was stuck by how many "illegitimate" grooms there were named Teitelbaum and Halberstam (only their mother's name was given on the marriage record). Perhaps there was some desire to carry on these names and this was the only way they could legally do it? It would be interesting to compare it to the corresponding Jewish marriage record.

If anyone knows where the post-1895 Jewish records of Satoraljaujhely are kept, please let me know, as I would like to have a look.

Beth Long
Budapest

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