Date   
Re: Surnames: Palumbo - SIcily/ Homer - Poland

Nardo Bonomi
 

 
Jews are attested in Sicily since the oldest times.
Jews were an high percentage of the population in Sicily before the expulsion of the year 1492.
After the persecution some Sicilian Jews ran away, some converted and some secretly practiced Judaism for generations (Anusim).
As you know the surname means dove and it is the equivalent to the Hebrew Jonah.
Some Palumbo who were surely Jews are attested in Sicily in the 16th century and were persecuted by the Inquisition because Judaizing after the expulsion .
They are attested in the towns of Nicosia  Palermo, Piazza  Armerina
 
Nardo Bonomi Braverman
Firenze – Italy
(Author of http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/Italy/italian.htm)
 

Re: Cemeteries in Israel

Dahn Cukier
 

Sorry to bust a bubble, but no. Only some
of the larger cemeteries have been done.

Problem that needs fixing. The search does not search with soundex.
Otherwise it seems fine.

When searching and not finding the grave, enter
one of the names and the father's name, narrow
the search years. I looked for a cousin I know is buried in
Jerusalem. I also know his family name is not spelled as
it sounds. I looked by first name and year of death and found
a fine photo of the grave.


BUT I am not surprised and I know that other
databases are no better. The official Tel Aviv
web site has many mistakes and when I find a
difference, I write to them. The same with the Ministry
of Defense, which has many mistakes also.

If you are planning to visit, I suggest looking
at Gravez which shows the "address" not only the
GPS location. My sister is buried on the 5th floor,
the first 2 floors have 4 graves at the same GPS each.

Dahn Cukier

On Thursday, November 7, 2019, 3:17:57 PM GMT+2, blankdavid via Groups.Jewishgen.Org <blankdavid=mac.com@...> wrote:


New app for cell phone.   GRAVEZ

Able to search all cemeteries in Israel.

Great app

David Blank
Jerusalem

Re: grave on Mt. of Olives

Varda Meyers Epstein
 

Roberta Lipitz wrote: " Looking for grave of Great Grandfather Hersche Shore buried on Mount Of Olives.  Unfortunately do not know dating.  Only know that he definitely left Jaffa (out of ship from Le Havre, France) July 1903 and went back to be buried years later in Jerusalem.

Any help/advice will be greatly appreciated. "

My son Aharon Epstein mans the information booth on the Mount of Olives; helps to maintain the database; and also helps people locate graves. Write to Har-hazetim@... or call 972-2-627-5050 Sun-Thurs 09:00-17:00 (Israel time).

There is also a website:  https://mountofolives.co.il/en/  but my son cautions that it only works with Chrome and that people should cancel the auto-translate (sorry, it's a work in progress).

Several articles have been written about my son and the work the City of David is doing at the Mount of Olives. They are really doing amazing work helping people locate family members and in adding graves to the database.  

Varda Epstein
Efrat, Israel

Re: Dorohi cemetery (Romania)

David Lewin
 

please where is that list kept?

David Lewin
London


At 09:08 PM 07-11-19, Malka wrote:
Hello Genners,
 
I have been working on the Dorohoi Jewish Cemetery listing  and it is  now at 93%.  No further images are available.  I’ll be happy to complete the listing once I am informed that the rest of the images have been released.   Shalom, Malka
 

please help Genner # 546778

cohen.izzy@...
 

Kathy Miller wrote:
Michael Herlitz lives in Bahnhofsstrasse 29 , Marburg. I've written to him with no response.

Psych. Michael Herlitz is on Facebook at
with that exact address in Marburg 35037
with phone number is +49 6421 681546
His mental health clinic is described here:
image.png
Best regards,
Israel A. Cohen

An Article About The Old Cemetery in Brody

abuwasta@...
 

Does any of you have an  easy access to this article which was published in 1920?
 
I am specially interested in a head stone from 1751(1751) bearing the the surname APTEIKER( אפטייקר(
 
 
"Gelber, Nathan Michael. “Aus dem Pinax des alten Judenfriedhofes in Brody (1699–1831). [From the pinax of Brody’s old Jewish cemetery.]”

Jahrbuch der Jüdisch-Literarischen Gesellschaft (1920): 119–41"
 
Many thanks from Jerusalem
 
Jacob Rosen
 
 

Re: NYC Area Volunteers for a Cemetery Project this Sunday

Hoffbrew@...
 

Hi Allan,
I live in Florida so obviously can't help you this Sunday.
I've read you go thru various cemeteries in New York. I have a grandmother buried at Mt.Hebron, Flushing if you could ever look for that stone: 
N.Y.Society: Knehin Stanislauer 5 10 f 33  Fannie Janofsky Hoffman.  Her sister Rebecca Janofsky Hoffman is also buried there (yes Rebecaa married Phillip and Fannie passed.

Do you know anyone who does this in NJ?

Thanks
Carole Hoffman Brewster
hoffbrew@...

translation from Polish (or maybe Russian)

Nurit Har-zvi
 

Hello,
I would like to request a translation of a document that I have placed
on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM75757

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much.
Nurit Har-zvi
New York

This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page

Bruce Drake
 

As if suffering through the horrors of the Nazi occupation was not enough, many of those who survived grappled with sorrow and loss when they returned to their home towns and found little or nothing left of the people and places they had known. “Dabrowa without Jews,” from the Yizkor book of Dabrowa Gornicza in Poland, is Juda Parasol’s account of returning to the town where he was born after a 15 year absence. He had been expelled to Siberia and, while there, received a last letter from his father wishing the family could be together again. But they had all died in Auschwitz. “Now I am standing in front of my father's house, and tears of murdered blood wash the windows,” Parasol laments. “The doors in front of me are locked and a cold, distant wind blows from them. The heart no longer wants to believe that here once lived Jews.”  


Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel

Re: Where is Politzk, Russia? #russsia #Lithuania

Irina Fridman
 

It's Polotzk or Polotsk in Belorus

Khashchevate - Chashivater Aid Society

paul.finelt@...
 

Does anyone have any information on this town and/or the Burial Society that has plots ar Montefiore Cemetary in Queens, NY and Beth Moses on Long Island?
My grandfather and uncle are buried there. My uncle was an officer of the society.  I have not been able to locate any details about the organization either at YIVO or from the cemeteries or other family members. 
Thank you. 
Paul FINELT 
FINELT WEINSTEIN LOTTERSTEIN LOITERSHETYN FRANTSUSKI PRILUTSKI 
BERSHAD OLGOPOL KHASCHEVATE KISHINEV BALTA TEPLIK MOSCOW 

Request Polish to English translation

ESLVIV@...
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following adddress ;...
Polish to English Marriage record- Grandfathers second
Thanks Errol Schneegurt ESLVIV@... LI NY


New Free Downloadable Tourist Guide to Jewish Kaliningrad by Jewish Heritage Europe #russia #prussia

Jan Meisels Allen
 

There is a new free, downloadable tourist guide for Jewish Kaliningrad (formerly Königsberg, East Prussia) available at:

https://jewsineastprussia.de/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Flyer-Jew-Koenigsberg-selfprint.pdf

 

The Jews in East Prussia History and Culture Society has now published a walking tour itinerary of the city’s former Jewish district .The brochure includes photographs and a map as well as historical information about places and people. There are 10 sops on the walking tour.

 

An article about the tourist guide is available at:

https://jewish-heritage-europe.eu/2019/11/07/russia-new-tourist-guide-to-jewish-kaliningrad-konigsberg/

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

ArkivDigital Free Access Through November 10 #sweden #scandinavia #archives

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

Starting today through Sunday, November 10 ArkivDigital is offering free access. You can browse for free more than 85 million photographed color images of their collections which include religious records, more than 160 million register posts searchable by name estate inventories, tax registers, military rolls, spy documents, passenger ship manifests, and more. You can search by name in the household congregation books for all of Sweden between 1860 and 1947.  Also available are millions of aerial photos of Sweden.

 

You are required to register first.  Go to:  https://www.arkivdigital.net/users/register  You need to provide your name, email address , street address and password. No credit card information is requested. Then start the program in your browsers: Chrome, Safari, Firefox and Edge. If you have previously registered you do not have to reregister.

 

After you have registered click on "start the program" –the blue button". You can select English or Swedish as the language of choice in the upper right hand corner.  They recommend Chrome as your browser for the best functionality. You will have to insert your email address and password again.

 

If you think you might not have ancestors from Sweden, there have been Jews in Sweden since the early 1700’s. albeit a small population.  Sweden opened its doors to Jews during WWII and again in 1956 when Jews were fleeing Hungary and then again when fleeing Communists in 1968. According  to the Jewish Virtual Library  the Jewish population increased tremendously between 1850 and 1920 due to immigration from Russia and Poland. The population reached nearly 6,500 in 1920. Small groups of German, Austrian, and Czech Jews were allowed to immigrate to Sweden during the 1930's. Once the Nazi brutalities were known Sweden opened its doors to Jews. In 1942, Sweden allowed the immigration of 900 Norwegian Jews. In October 1943, Sweden gave asylum to more than 8,000 Danish Jews, the whole Danish Jewish community, which came to Sweden via small fishing boats. The Jewish population doubled  between 1945-1970.

 

Questions on this can be sent to ArkivDigital in Swedish time to kundtjanst@...

 

I have no affiliation with ArkivDigital and am posting this solely for the information of the readers.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 

Re: Help - Crack a puzzle about Ptaszek family research

Eva Lawrence
 


 I can think of two explanations:1) Dvora died before Asher and he married again. 2) That your grandfather was born to Nachman's parents after th first Asher died and given the same name. Neither is very likely, I admit, unless some of the data is very vague. Could Asher have been a bigamist? Did Beyla's date of death? Or the names of her parents?
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK. 30 

Re: NYC Area Volunteers for a Cemetery Project this Sunday

A. E. Jordan
 

Hi

I can do Hebron but I doubt this week ... depends how long we will spend at Zion.

Which cemetery do you need in New Jersey?  Occasionally I have done northern New Jersey but otherwise it is hit or miss.  You can ask on the discussion group or try Find A Grave but then you need to be very specific on the location.  People post a lot of generic requests on Find a Grave and those get ignored in the larger cemeteries.

Regards

Allan




-----Original Message-----
From: Hoffbrew via Groups.Jewishgen.Org <Hoffbrew=aol.com@...>
To: A. E. Jordan <aejordan@...>; main <main@...>
Sent: Fri, Nov 8, 2019 11:29 am
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] NYC Area Volunteers for a Cemetery Project this Sunday

Hi Allan,
I live in Florida so obviously can't help you this Sunday.
I've read you go thru various cemeteries in New York. I have a grandmother buried at Mt.Hebron, Flushing if you could ever look for that stone: 
N.Y.Society: Knehin Stanislauer 5 10 f 33  Fannie Janofsky Hoffman.  Her sister Rebecca Janofsky Hoffman is also buried there (yes Rebecaa married Phillip and Fannie passed.

Do you know anyone who does this in NJ?

Thanks
Carole Hoffman Brewster
hoffbrew@...

Supreme Court of Canada Reviewing Appeal to Strike Down Protection From Genetic Discrimination #canada #DNA #privacy

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

                                      

In a recent decision, the Quebec Court of Appeals declared the 2017 Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (the "Act"), adopted by the federal Parliament and which came into force on May 4, 2017, to be ultra vires because of its encroachment on the jurisdiction of provincial legislatures.  (Ultra Vires- beyond one's legal power or authority. (https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/ultra_vires).  This is being appealed to Canada’s Supreme Court by the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness. The Supreme Court will  have to decide on the constitutional validity of a law under the Constitution's Division of powers, and incidentally, on which level of government is entitled to legislate on protection against genetic discrimination for Canadians.  The Court heard the case on October 4th, a ruling is not expected until sometime in 2020.

 

The question put before the Court was:

"Is the Genetic Non-Discrimination Act enacted by sections 1 to 7 of the Act to prohibit and prevent genetic discrimination, (S.C. 2017, c. 3) ultra vires to the jurisdiction of the Parliament of Canada over criminal law under paragraph 91 (27) of the Constitution Act, 1867?"

 

They then had to analyze the sections of the Act.  The Court found that the main purpose of the Act was not to address a criminal law object but rather to protect and to promote health by fostering the access by Canadians to genetic tests for medical purposes

 

The Quebec Court opined that the main purpose of the Act was to promote the health of Canadians by encouraging access to genetic tests for medical purposes. Therefore,  the Act sought to regulate matters falling under the province's jurisdiction, namely genetic discrimination in employment and insurance contracts (civil and property rights), rather than criminal law, which would fall under federal jurisdiction. This is the crux of the court case: whether the Act is a valid exercise of Parliament’s criminal law power or does the aw really regulate the insurance industry an area that falls under provincial jurisdiction.

 

The case is also a test of Parliament’s criminal law power. The genetic characteristics as a ground for discrimination under the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Canada Labor Code. Which were unaffected by the Quebec decision.

 

Of course privacy is a key element as one’s genetic makeup is something that should only be used with one’s permission.

 

History

 

Prior to the Genetic Non-Discrimination Act Canada did not have legislation in force that addressed genetic discrimination and particular protection of the human genome.  The purpose of the legislation was to prohibit and prevent genetic discrimination in requiring any individual from undergoing genetic testing or disclosing genetic test results under certain circumstances.  The Act also amended the Canada Labor Code and the Canadian Human Rights Act to address discrimination, particularly in the areas of insurance and labor relations, by adding the terms "genetic characteristics".

 

The Act went forward by the federal parliament although there was concern at the time due to the Constitution’s division of powers.  The issue is if the regulation of contracts and provision of goods and services in the Constitution is being violated. Following its adoption, it did not take long for the Government of Québec to issue a decree in order to ask the Court of Appeal to verify the constitutional validity of the law, on the grounds that the Act encroaches on the jurisdiction of provincial legislatures to regulate private law.  Interestingly, for the first time the government of Canada has intervened to challenge the constitutionality of a bill passed by Parliament,  the Attorney of Canada rather than supporting the constitutionality of a federal law joined the Quebec Attorney General to defend Quebec’s ruling on jurisdictional grounds.

 

To read more see:

https://www.nationalmagazine.ca/en-ca/articles/law/hot-topics-in-law/2019/genetic-privacy-legislation-goes-to-the-scc

and

https://ipolitics.ca/2019/10/10/genetic-non-discrimination-bill-passed-by-parliament-but-challenged-by-government-at-top-court/

 

There may be legislation introduced in the provinces to protect their citizens while this is being reviewed by the Supreme Court. While I heard about a campaign for such legislation in the Province of Ontario, I was not able at this time to find the bill.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 

General Register Office Added Death Records Index from 1984-2019 #United Kingdom #Records Access #united #records

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

 

The United Kingdom’s General Register Office (GRO) has added the index of deaths from 1984 to 2019. These cover England and Wales records only.

 

It is recommended that you go to the FAQs before ordering:

https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/faq.asp#GROIndexReferences

This also includes the pricing and explains the GRO indexing reference numbers.

 

Go to:

https://www.gro.gov.uk. Click on order records online.  You must be registered with email address and password to proceed. The next window asks what you want to do  and click on the GRO Indexes. That will open asking if you want birth or death indexes and then fill out the form for whom you are looking for.

 

Note: birth records are available only through 1918 due to the 100 privacy requirement.

 

Thank you to Jeanette Rosenberg, JGS United Kingdom for informing us about the death index update.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 

 

Ancestry Canada and Ancestry UK Offering Free Access to War Time Records

Jan Meisels Allen
 

As I mentioned in yesterday’s posting about Ancestry.com and their Veterans Day free access offer, I did not know at the time what the Ancestry Canada or Ancestry UK sites would be offering for their Remembrance Day. They too are offering free access, but you have to log into each one individually to access the free records.

 

Canada

Ancestry is offering free access to all Canadian Military Records from 8 November 2019 to 11 November 2019 11:59 p.m. ET

Please use the time converter to check the time in your time zone; http://www.timezoneconverter.com/cgi-bin/tzc

 

You must register with your name, email address and password.  Go to:  https://www.ancestry.ca/cs/remembrance-day

Fill out the form with the person you are searching with their name and location and birth year if you have it.  When the results page comes up select the record for your person.  Then select the record. If you want to save the record to your computer click on the green save box in the  upper right.  If you want to print or download click on the tools icon on the right of the screen.


to see the list of collections available for free during this promotion go to:

https://www.ancestry.ca/search/categories/ca_military/

 

After the free access period ends, you will only be able to view the records in the featured collection using a paid Ancestry membership. If you try to access any records not included in the free offer you will be invited to subscribe.

 

United Kingdom

 

Ancestry is offering free access to all United Kingdom Military Records (World War l and World War ll) from 8 November 2019 to 11 November 2019 11:59 p.m. ET

Please use the time converter to check the time in your time zone: http://www.timezoneconverter.com/cgi-bin/tzc

You must register with your name, email address and password. You must register separately from your US or Canadian subscription.


to see the records included in the free access to military records go to:

https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/categories/uk_wartime_collections/  On the top of the page fill out the form with the person you are searching with their name and location and birth year if you have it.  When the results page comes up select the record for your person.  Then select the record. If you want to save the record to your computer click on the green save box in the  upper right.  If you want to print or download click on the tools icon on the right of the screen.

 

After the free access period ends, you will only be able to view the records in the featured collection using a paid Ancestry membership. If you try to access any records not included in the free offer you will be invited to subscribe.

 

I have no affiliation with Ancestry and am posting this solely for the information of the reader.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 

 

The DNA Testing Companies Reply to Warrant Permitting Police Full Access to GEDmatch Database #DNA

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

Earlier this week I posted about a Florida judge granting a warrant to law enforcement to search GEDmatch’s full database. The court basically overruled the public DNA company’s policy on privacy. Since then both Ancestry and 23andMe—both private DNA testing companies,  have issued statements.

 

Ancestry

Ancestry believes GEDmatch could have done more to protect the privacy of its users by challenging the warrant in court or at least pushing back on the warrant.  Ancestry has emphasized that their customer’s privacy and being good stewards of their data is their highest priority. They also have a transparency report that outlines law enforcement requests for member data. They say they received no valid requests for information related to genetic information. To read their statement in full including the Coalition for Genetic Data Protection’s comments, of which Ancestry is a member see:

https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2019/11/08/your-privacy-is-our-top-priority/

 

23andMe

 

23andme also issued a statement commenting on how troubling they find GEDmatch’s lack of challenging the warrant. They question as a private database whether the Florida court’s warrant impacts them. 23andMe also has a transparency report and they have received 10 requests out of their 10 million customers and successfully challenged each one. They are also a member of the Coalition for Genetic Data Protection.

Their statement may be found at: https://blog.23andme.com/news/our-stance-on-protecting-customers-data/

 

I have no affiliation with either Ancestry or 23andMe ad am reporting on this solely for the information of the reader.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee