Date   
Re: R' Yokel HIRSCH from Nowy Targ #rabbinic

Sandor Bacskai <bacskaisanyi@...>
 

On 2006.05.10, Joel Hirsch <jhirsch@...> wrote:

[...] we would like to find out the exact location of his original
burial place, and the exact date that he died, as well as more
information on his background [...]
Dear Joel,

Regarding the exact date when the Rabbi of Nowy Targ passed away, did
you check the Jewish records? Did you try to find the paper "Machzike
Hadass"? This weekly was published in Cracow by Rabbi Shimon Sofer
(the son of the Chasam Sofer of Pressburg).

Sandor Bacskai
Budapest, Hungary

Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: R' Yokel HIRSCH from Nowy Targ #rabbinic

Sandor Bacskai <bacskaisanyi@...>
 

On 2006.05.10, Joel Hirsch <jhirsch@...> wrote:

[...] we would like to find out the exact location of his original
burial place, and the exact date that he died, as well as more
information on his background [...]
Dear Joel,

Regarding the exact date when the Rabbi of Nowy Targ passed away, did
you check the Jewish records? Did you try to find the paper "Machzike
Hadass"? This weekly was published in Cracow by Rabbi Shimon Sofer
(the son of the Chasam Sofer of Pressburg).

Sandor Bacskai
Budapest, Hungary

more information on new Gedenkbuch #germany

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

Yesterday I posted a message here about a JTA (jta.org) report that Germany
just published a new, expanded list of its citizens who were killed in the
Holocaust" and wondered if this new publication is the long awaited update
of the Gedenkbuch. It does seem to be.

A press release >from the Deutsche Presse-Agentur, which appears on the web
site of Boston's Combined Jewish Philanthropies

www.cjp.org/content_display.html?ArticleID=183297

contains additional information on the four-volume book, which was compiled
by Germany's Federal Archives and introduced at a ceremony at Berlin's New
Synagogue on Monday.

The article also mentions that a computer database of Jews in Germany, based
on a 1939 census, can be consulted at the New Synagogue, and that the
Archives is working to compile list of all Jews living in Germany 1933-1945.

I have no information beyond what's in the article online. Renee

Renee Stern Steinig Dix Hills, New York, USA rsteinig@...

German SIG #Germany more information on new Gedenkbuch #germany

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

Yesterday I posted a message here about a JTA (jta.org) report that Germany
just published a new, expanded list of its citizens who were killed in the
Holocaust" and wondered if this new publication is the long awaited update
of the Gedenkbuch. It does seem to be.

A press release >from the Deutsche Presse-Agentur, which appears on the web
site of Boston's Combined Jewish Philanthropies

www.cjp.org/content_display.html?ArticleID=183297

contains additional information on the four-volume book, which was compiled
by Germany's Federal Archives and introduced at a ceremony at Berlin's New
Synagogue on Monday.

The article also mentions that a computer database of Jews in Germany, based
on a 1939 census, can be consulted at the New Synagogue, and that the
Archives is working to compile list of all Jews living in Germany 1933-1945.

I have no information beyond what's in the article online. Renee

Renee Stern Steinig Dix Hills, New York, USA rsteinig@...

San Francisco Bay Area JGS meeting 5/21/06 #general

Jerry acobson <drjjsf@...>
 

San Francisco Meeting

Topic: A Potpourri of Genealogical Search Tools
Speaker: Stephen Morse, Ph.D.
Date: Sunday, May 21, 2006
Time: 12:30: Doors open
1:00: Program begins
Where: Jewish Community High School
1835 Ellis St.
San Francisco, CA
Free parking, entrance on Pierce St,
Entry: Free
Info: http://www.jewishgen.org/sfbajgs

The One-Step website started out as an aid for finding
passengers in the Ellis Island database. Shortly
afterwards it was expanded to help with searching in
the 1930 census. Over the years it has continued to
evolve and today includes more than 100 web-based
tools divided into eleven separate categories ranging
from genealogical searches to astronomical
calculations to Israeli phonebook lookups. This
presentation will describe the range of tools
available and give the highlights of each one.

Jerry Jacobson Please send replies to ----drjjsf@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen San Francisco Bay Area JGS meeting 5/21/06 #general

Jerry acobson <drjjsf@...>
 

San Francisco Meeting

Topic: A Potpourri of Genealogical Search Tools
Speaker: Stephen Morse, Ph.D.
Date: Sunday, May 21, 2006
Time: 12:30: Doors open
1:00: Program begins
Where: Jewish Community High School
1835 Ellis St.
San Francisco, CA
Free parking, entrance on Pierce St,
Entry: Free
Info: http://www.jewishgen.org/sfbajgs

The One-Step website started out as an aid for finding
passengers in the Ellis Island database. Shortly
afterwards it was expanded to help with searching in
the 1930 census. Over the years it has continued to
evolve and today includes more than 100 web-based
tools divided into eleven separate categories ranging
from genealogical searches to astronomical
calculations to Israeli phonebook lookups. This
presentation will describe the range of tools
available and give the highlights of each one.

Jerry Jacobson Please send replies to ----drjjsf@...

Zolty Family in Lodz #lodz #poland

franck
 

I'm searching informations about my family in Lodz Region, I
send you the search of my ZOLTY's family :


To thank you for your interest in my genealogy, I am sending you my notes
about my family links to Herschel Feibel GRYNSZPAN

THE ZOLTY-GRYNSZPAN FAMILY

My grandfather, David Kalma ZOLTY, knew Herschel Feibel GRYNSZPAN as they
came >from the same Shtetl : Nowo-Radomsk, voivodie of Piotrkow Trybunalski
in Pologne. Herschel was the nephew of one of his cousins,: Szalma ZOLTY who
worked in the same shtetl.

Aharon ZOLTY, the cousin of my mother was born on Thursday 8 July 1926.
Her father, Szlomo died in the Ghetto de Lodz, on 20 August 1942. He
expected a very difficult situation. The parents of Aharon: Szlomo ZOLTY
and Dina KORN felt the beginning of Polish anti-Semitism:

After the revolution of 1905, the Jewish population increased as a result of
the influx of Lithuanian Jews in the industrial centers of the province,
Warsaw and Lodz. Polish patriots were worried to see that the Jews had, in
their hands, the principal branches of business and industry. They accused
the Lithuanian Jews on the one hand, of trying to Russianize Poland, because
they spoke Russian in the streets of Warsaw and Lodz, and on the other, to
try to create a second Jewish land, because they lived in a compact and
united community. Others accused the Jews of Germanizing Poland, because
the spoke a Jewish Germanic language - Yiddish. The industrial and business
class in Poland eliminated the Jews >from vital economic life by boycotting.

This polish anti-Semitism was conjugated with Nazism which provoked the
revolt of Herszel Feilbel GRYNSZPAN which led him to this attack.

Aharon ZOLTY, rescued >from Auschwitz tells us that Herschel in
prison might have been protected by Jewish organizations who would have
given a fee to the German authorities during the entire war. Or perhaps, a
more plausible explanation, he was kept alive as proof of the nuisance that
was the Jewish people in the expectation of a great trial.

Our cousin, Aharon ZOLTY remembers that before he was deported, he was
identified by a journalist as being part of the "assassin's family."

The thing that led to Herschel's rancor was that his parents had been thrown
out of Germany (Hamburg) to the No Man's Land between Poland and Germany7,
and that Poland didn't want them any more. There were more than 15000 in
this situation. A bit later, Zendel GRYNSZPAN, father of Herschel, seems to
have fought in the Russian army6. His parents are both dead now, Zendel
was 96 at his death. Remaining is the wife of the brother of Herschel with
whom Aharon is still in contact.

Aharon ZOLTY was always invited to family festivities, such as the silver
anniversary of Herschel's parents.

Herschel Feibel GRYNSZPAN did not survive the war.

After his liberation >from the death camps, Aharon Zolty found the family
ZOLTY-GRYNSZPAN in Israel.

My grandfather, David Kalma ZOLTY, persuaded that he had lost his entire
polish family, because he couldn't find out about them through various
organizations like the International Red Cross, did not speak about this
cousin Herschel to his children.

It was only through my research on the Jewishgen site, last year, that I
found two cousins of my mother: Joseph ZOLTY, deported to Treblinka and
Aharon ZOLTY, deported to Auschwitz, both living in Israel and whose stories
allowed us to undertake this research

Joseph ZOLTY's wife never understood the attitude of the German
people. She was herself a native of Czernowitz (Bukovine, today, Ukraine)
and had received a German culture. She was, later, rescued in the death
camps. Once liberated, Eti PRESHEL married Joseph ZOLTY in Chypre and left
for Israel permanently in 1948.

Other bits of information came to me through my request on the Jewishgen
site, where I learned that Mr Ilan KRAUSE, living en Israel, is also a
descendent of the ZOLTY-GRYNSZPAN family.

The grandparents of Ilan KRAUSE (David Krojle and Rajzla GOLDBERG) were
first cousins of Itta ZYLBERBERG and Szalma ZOLTY, uncles of Herschel Feibel
GRYNSZPAN, and first cousins of my grandfather David Kalma ZOLTY. Ilan
KRAUSE, born in 1959, he married Irit SCHETCHTMAN (born 3 November 1960 in
Moscow) in Israel. Itta ZYLBERBERG's grandfather : Herszik Faywel ZYLBERBERG
was also the grandfather of the grandfather of Ilan KRAUSE.

Franck d'Almeida-Zolty

franck.d-almeida@...

Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Zolty Family in Lodz #lodz #poland

franck
 

I'm searching informations about my family in Lodz Region, I
send you the search of my ZOLTY's family :


To thank you for your interest in my genealogy, I am sending you my notes
about my family links to Herschel Feibel GRYNSZPAN

THE ZOLTY-GRYNSZPAN FAMILY

My grandfather, David Kalma ZOLTY, knew Herschel Feibel GRYNSZPAN as they
came >from the same Shtetl : Nowo-Radomsk, voivodie of Piotrkow Trybunalski
in Pologne. Herschel was the nephew of one of his cousins,: Szalma ZOLTY who
worked in the same shtetl.

Aharon ZOLTY, the cousin of my mother was born on Thursday 8 July 1926.
Her father, Szlomo died in the Ghetto de Lodz, on 20 August 1942. He
expected a very difficult situation. The parents of Aharon: Szlomo ZOLTY
and Dina KORN felt the beginning of Polish anti-Semitism:

After the revolution of 1905, the Jewish population increased as a result of
the influx of Lithuanian Jews in the industrial centers of the province,
Warsaw and Lodz. Polish patriots were worried to see that the Jews had, in
their hands, the principal branches of business and industry. They accused
the Lithuanian Jews on the one hand, of trying to Russianize Poland, because
they spoke Russian in the streets of Warsaw and Lodz, and on the other, to
try to create a second Jewish land, because they lived in a compact and
united community. Others accused the Jews of Germanizing Poland, because
the spoke a Jewish Germanic language - Yiddish. The industrial and business
class in Poland eliminated the Jews >from vital economic life by boycotting.

This polish anti-Semitism was conjugated with Nazism which provoked the
revolt of Herszel Feilbel GRYNSZPAN which led him to this attack.

Aharon ZOLTY, rescued >from Auschwitz tells us that Herschel in
prison might have been protected by Jewish organizations who would have
given a fee to the German authorities during the entire war. Or perhaps, a
more plausible explanation, he was kept alive as proof of the nuisance that
was the Jewish people in the expectation of a great trial.

Our cousin, Aharon ZOLTY remembers that before he was deported, he was
identified by a journalist as being part of the "assassin's family."

The thing that led to Herschel's rancor was that his parents had been thrown
out of Germany (Hamburg) to the No Man's Land between Poland and Germany7,
and that Poland didn't want them any more. There were more than 15000 in
this situation. A bit later, Zendel GRYNSZPAN, father of Herschel, seems to
have fought in the Russian army6. His parents are both dead now, Zendel
was 96 at his death. Remaining is the wife of the brother of Herschel with
whom Aharon is still in contact.

Aharon ZOLTY was always invited to family festivities, such as the silver
anniversary of Herschel's parents.

Herschel Feibel GRYNSZPAN did not survive the war.

After his liberation >from the death camps, Aharon Zolty found the family
ZOLTY-GRYNSZPAN in Israel.

My grandfather, David Kalma ZOLTY, persuaded that he had lost his entire
polish family, because he couldn't find out about them through various
organizations like the International Red Cross, did not speak about this
cousin Herschel to his children.

It was only through my research on the Jewishgen site, last year, that I
found two cousins of my mother: Joseph ZOLTY, deported to Treblinka and
Aharon ZOLTY, deported to Auschwitz, both living in Israel and whose stories
allowed us to undertake this research

Joseph ZOLTY's wife never understood the attitude of the German
people. She was herself a native of Czernowitz (Bukovine, today, Ukraine)
and had received a German culture. She was, later, rescued in the death
camps. Once liberated, Eti PRESHEL married Joseph ZOLTY in Chypre and left
for Israel permanently in 1948.

Other bits of information came to me through my request on the Jewishgen
site, where I learned that Mr Ilan KRAUSE, living en Israel, is also a
descendent of the ZOLTY-GRYNSZPAN family.

The grandparents of Ilan KRAUSE (David Krojle and Rajzla GOLDBERG) were
first cousins of Itta ZYLBERBERG and Szalma ZOLTY, uncles of Herschel Feibel
GRYNSZPAN, and first cousins of my grandfather David Kalma ZOLTY. Ilan
KRAUSE, born in 1959, he married Irit SCHETCHTMAN (born 3 November 1960 in
Moscow) in Israel. Itta ZYLBERBERG's grandfather : Herszik Faywel ZYLBERBERG
was also the grandfather of the grandfather of Ilan KRAUSE.

Franck d'Almeida-Zolty

franck.d-almeida@...

Letter to the Stars - NEURATH #austria-czech

Alan Kolnik <alan.kolnik@...>
 

I followed up on Celia's message about the Letter to the Stars, and
discovered that two little girls had researched details of my wife's
grandfather, Michael NEURATH, of Mödling bei Wien, and, if I understand
correctly, released a balloon in his memory. My brother-in-law will be
visiting there in a month or so, so this was very timely!

Thank you Celia!

Regards

Alan Kolnik
Bethesda, MD

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Letter to the Stars - NEURATH #austria-czech

Alan Kolnik <alan.kolnik@...>
 

I followed up on Celia's message about the Letter to the Stars, and
discovered that two little girls had researched details of my wife's
grandfather, Michael NEURATH, of Mödling bei Wien, and, if I understand
correctly, released a balloon in his memory. My brother-in-law will be
visiting there in a month or so, so this was very timely!

Thank you Celia!

Regards

Alan Kolnik
Bethesda, MD

Tsarfati family and Rashi descent #rabbinic

Chaim freedman
 

The Chida ("Shem Hagedolim Hakhadash") states that Vidal Hatzarfati
"had a Yikhus till Rabbenu Tam, the son of the daughter of Rashi.
And I heard that the Rabbi Eliyahu was 15th generation >from Rabbeinu
Tam."

Yet the Chida does not trace the intervening generations. Therefore
the statement in the Jewish Encyclopedia that the Chida "traced ...
to a line of French rabbis descended >from Rashi" is inaccurate. He
refers to a tradition without providing details of "a line."

Furthermore there were a number of families called Tsarfati, since
it indicated origins in France. The Treves family, descended from
Rashi also had members who used the appellative "Tsarfati." The
Trabot family was also known as Tsarfati, and although intermarried
with Treves, did not claim Rashi descent. See Yosef Grin's
"Mishpakhat Trabot". Grin disputes the claim that Treves and
Trabot were variant forms of the same name.

from the Chida's comment no doubt there are Tsarfati families which
hold a tradition of Rashi descent, but I would appreciate further
information.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel

Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Tsarfati family and Rashi descent #rabbinic

Chaim freedman
 

The Chida ("Shem Hagedolim Hakhadash") states that Vidal Hatzarfati
"had a Yikhus till Rabbenu Tam, the son of the daughter of Rashi.
And I heard that the Rabbi Eliyahu was 15th generation >from Rabbeinu
Tam."

Yet the Chida does not trace the intervening generations. Therefore
the statement in the Jewish Encyclopedia that the Chida "traced ...
to a line of French rabbis descended >from Rashi" is inaccurate. He
refers to a tradition without providing details of "a line."

Furthermore there were a number of families called Tsarfati, since
it indicated origins in France. The Treves family, descended from
Rashi also had members who used the appellative "Tsarfati." The
Trabot family was also known as Tsarfati, and although intermarried
with Treves, did not claim Rashi descent. See Yosef Grin's
"Mishpakhat Trabot". Grin disputes the claim that Treves and
Trabot were variant forms of the same name.

from the Chida's comment no doubt there are Tsarfati families which
hold a tradition of Rashi descent, but I would appreciate further
information.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel

Re: Laying tefillin on board ship #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <1147333376.4462eb0075e81@...>,
IsraelP <IsraelP@...> wrote:

We have a case of a thirteen year old boy who travelled to the US with his
father in 1900, but to save money he was listed as eleven years old.

My first thought was "What about his tefillin?" Would it have caused a
problem is he had been "caught" doing what an eleven year old shouldn't be
doing, thus giving away the cheating on price? Would anyone have cared?
Would he have been able to do so off in a corner where no one would notice?
Or did he perhaps learn a lesson about saving money even at the cost of
religious obsevrance?
Do you think the ship's officers would remember who had a child's
ticket, and what they looked like, and would notice what somebody
praying in a corner was wearing, and would know at what age Jewish boys
start wearing tefillin? It seems to me like a rather far-fetched
concern.

Robert Israel israel@...
Vancouver, BC, Canada

Re: Laying tefillin on board ship #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/11/2006 11:40:33 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
IsraelP@... writes:

< We have a case of a thirteen year old boy who travelled to the US with
his father in 1900, but to save money he was listed as eleven years old.

< My first thought was "What about his tefillin?" Would it have caused a
problem is he had been "caught" doing what an eleven year old shouldn't be
doing, thus giving away the cheating on price? Would anyone have cared?
Would he have been able to do so off in a corner where no one would notice?
Or did he perhaps learn a lesson about saving money even at the cost of
religious obsevrance? >

1. He made sure to travel on the intermediate days of Passover or Sukkot. In
the Diaspora, Sfardim and Hasidim (nusach Sfard) do not don tefillin during
the intermediate days of the festivals while Mitnaggedim do; in Israel it is
the universal custom not to wear them on the intermediate days.

2. If there was an area set aside for Jewish prayer, I am sure the ship's
crew did not intrude during services.

3. When traveling by train or channel ferry in England and Europe I was
always able to find a place to put on tfeilin out of sight of the public.

4. I am not a posek but I believe that in the case of emergency there is a
specific procedure where one can recite the blessing and put on the tefilin
for just a moment and still fulfill the Mitzvah.

5. One can hide the head tefilin under the brim of a hat and the hand one
under a shirt or jacket.

6. There are many miraculous tales in Medrash and Talmud where someone put
on tefilin under dangerous circumstances without suffering, usually as the
result of a miraculous intervention (e.g. they tefilin turned into a pair of
pigeons and flew away).

7. The other Jews formed a tight wall around him so that no one could see.

8. He fibbed and said it was the custom in his community to start wearing
them at 11.

9. He fibbed and said he had made a vow to his grandfather to wear them
daily, even though he was too young.

10 The ship's purser didn't have a copy of the ArtScroll Siddur and didn't
give a damn for how the Jews prayed, even if they cheated a little on the
fare.

Michael Bernet, New York

JewishGen experiencing hardware failure #rabbinic

Carol W. Skydell <cwskydell@...>
 

While it does not affect our mailing lists, all pages accessed >from
www.jewishgen.org are unavailable. We have someone working on the
problem but we have no idea when things will be back on line.

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Laying tefillin on board ship #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <1147333376.4462eb0075e81@...>,
IsraelP <IsraelP@...> wrote:

We have a case of a thirteen year old boy who travelled to the US with his
father in 1900, but to save money he was listed as eleven years old.

My first thought was "What about his tefillin?" Would it have caused a
problem is he had been "caught" doing what an eleven year old shouldn't be
doing, thus giving away the cheating on price? Would anyone have cared?
Would he have been able to do so off in a corner where no one would notice?
Or did he perhaps learn a lesson about saving money even at the cost of
religious obsevrance?
Do you think the ship's officers would remember who had a child's
ticket, and what they looked like, and would notice what somebody
praying in a corner was wearing, and would know at what age Jewish boys
start wearing tefillin? It seems to me like a rather far-fetched
concern.

Robert Israel israel@...
Vancouver, BC, Canada

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Laying tefillin on board ship #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/11/2006 11:40:33 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
IsraelP@... writes:

< We have a case of a thirteen year old boy who travelled to the US with
his father in 1900, but to save money he was listed as eleven years old.

< My first thought was "What about his tefillin?" Would it have caused a
problem is he had been "caught" doing what an eleven year old shouldn't be
doing, thus giving away the cheating on price? Would anyone have cared?
Would he have been able to do so off in a corner where no one would notice?
Or did he perhaps learn a lesson about saving money even at the cost of
religious obsevrance? >

1. He made sure to travel on the intermediate days of Passover or Sukkot. In
the Diaspora, Sfardim and Hasidim (nusach Sfard) do not don tefillin during
the intermediate days of the festivals while Mitnaggedim do; in Israel it is
the universal custom not to wear them on the intermediate days.

2. If there was an area set aside for Jewish prayer, I am sure the ship's
crew did not intrude during services.

3. When traveling by train or channel ferry in England and Europe I was
always able to find a place to put on tfeilin out of sight of the public.

4. I am not a posek but I believe that in the case of emergency there is a
specific procedure where one can recite the blessing and put on the tefilin
for just a moment and still fulfill the Mitzvah.

5. One can hide the head tefilin under the brim of a hat and the hand one
under a shirt or jacket.

6. There are many miraculous tales in Medrash and Talmud where someone put
on tefilin under dangerous circumstances without suffering, usually as the
result of a miraculous intervention (e.g. they tefilin turned into a pair of
pigeons and flew away).

7. The other Jews formed a tight wall around him so that no one could see.

8. He fibbed and said it was the custom in his community to start wearing
them at 11.

9. He fibbed and said he had made a vow to his grandfather to wear them
daily, even though he was too young.

10 The ship's purser didn't have a copy of the ArtScroll Siddur and didn't
give a damn for how the Jews prayed, even if they cheated a little on the
fare.

Michael Bernet, New York

Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic JewishGen experiencing hardware failure #rabbinic

Carol W. Skydell <cwskydell@...>
 

While it does not affect our mailing lists, all pages accessed >from
www.jewishgen.org are unavailable. We have someone working on the
problem but we have no idea when things will be back on line.

Carol W. Skydell, Vice President
JewishGen Special Projects

Re: Laying tefillin on board ship #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

IsraelP wrote on 11 mei 2006 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

We have a case of a thirteen year old boy who travelled to the US with
his father in 1900, but to save money he was listed as eleven years
old.

My first thought was "What about his tefillin?" Would it have caused
a problem is he had been "caught" doing what an eleven year old
shouldn't be doing, thus giving away the cheating on price? Would
anyone have cared? Would he have been able to do so off in a corner
where no one would notice? Or did he perhaps learn a lesson about
saving money even at the cost of religious obsevrance?
The first question would be:
Was he Jewish?

If so, the second:
Was he observant?

Neither is obvious >from your description.

There are many thing a 11 year old boy shouldn't be doing,
and would prefer not to be caught in/with.
It is a way of life for 11 year olds,
as I remember >from 50 years ago.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Laying tefillin on board ship #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

IsraelP wrote on 11 mei 2006 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

We have a case of a thirteen year old boy who travelled to the US with
his father in 1900, but to save money he was listed as eleven years
old.

My first thought was "What about his tefillin?" Would it have caused
a problem is he had been "caught" doing what an eleven year old
shouldn't be doing, thus giving away the cheating on price? Would
anyone have cared? Would he have been able to do so off in a corner
where no one would notice? Or did he perhaps learn a lesson about
saving money even at the cost of religious obsevrance?
The first question would be:
Was he Jewish?

If so, the second:
Was he observant?

Neither is obvious >from your description.

There are many thing a 11 year old boy shouldn't be doing,
and would prefer not to be caught in/with.
It is a way of life for 11 year olds,
as I remember >from 50 years ago.

--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)