Date   

Re: Yiddish name Pini #general

Moshe Shulman <MosheNOSPAM@...>
 

On 25 Oct 1999 08:18:48 -0700, Chanaleh@aol.com wrote:

Does anyone have a clue what might be the Russian/Ukrainian "name" of a
man whose name in Yiddish was Pini? He was in the Soviet Union army in
World War II so it is unlikely that he would have gone by his Yiddish
name.

I don't know the Russian, but Pini, is short for Pinchas.

moshe shulman mshulman@NOSPAMix.netcom.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Submitters should supply spam removal instructions
(e.g. 'remove nospam') with their postings.


Naming children after grandparents #general

jeremy.hodes@...
 

I would apprciate some assistance on this matter. It appears to be
fairly common in our tree (On the Eastern European side)that
grandchildren have similar first or second names to those of their
grandparents. Is this standard practice? I have also found a
situation where the youngest grandson has the same name as the
grandparent. Again, is this standard practice, as I would have
thought that the eldest grandson would have been honoured in this way.

Thanks

Jeremy Hodes
Cairns, Australia

hodes@sportsmail.com


Quarantined on Arrival #general

Carl Glatky <cglatky@...>
 

Would anyone know if and where records are kept of those who were
quarantined on their arrival at Ellis Island?
Many thanks,
Carl Glatky


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish name Pini #general

Moshe Shulman <MosheNOSPAM@...>
 

On 25 Oct 1999 08:18:48 -0700, Chanaleh@aol.com wrote:

Does anyone have a clue what might be the Russian/Ukrainian "name" of a
man whose name in Yiddish was Pini? He was in the Soviet Union army in
World War II so it is unlikely that he would have gone by his Yiddish
name.

I don't know the Russian, but Pini, is short for Pinchas.

moshe shulman mshulman@NOSPAMix.netcom.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Submitters should supply spam removal instructions
(e.g. 'remove nospam') with their postings.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Naming children after grandparents #general

jeremy.hodes@...
 

I would apprciate some assistance on this matter. It appears to be
fairly common in our tree (On the Eastern European side)that
grandchildren have similar first or second names to those of their
grandparents. Is this standard practice? I have also found a
situation where the youngest grandson has the same name as the
grandparent. Again, is this standard practice, as I would have
thought that the eldest grandson would have been honoured in this way.

Thanks

Jeremy Hodes
Cairns, Australia

hodes@sportsmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Quarantined on Arrival #general

Carl Glatky <cglatky@...>
 

Would anyone know if and where records are kept of those who were
quarantined on their arrival at Ellis Island?
Many thanks,
Carl Glatky


JGS Michigan #general

Fred Apel <fredapel@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Michigan will make a trip to the
Burton Collection of the Detroit Public Library on Wednesday October 27,
1999. For those members who have not been to Burton previously, there
will be a short guided tour. The trip will car pool >from Deli Unique on
Telegraph Road (next to Morels) at 5:45pm and will return when the
library closes at 9:00 pm. Please call Jim Grey at 248-540-9070 for
reservations to save your spot in a car pool. Those wishing to join us
for dinner at Deli Unique, may join us at 5:00pm.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS Michigan #general

Fred Apel <fredapel@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Michigan will make a trip to the
Burton Collection of the Detroit Public Library on Wednesday October 27,
1999. For those members who have not been to Burton previously, there
will be a short guided tour. The trip will car pool >from Deli Unique on
Telegraph Road (next to Morels) at 5:45pm and will return when the
library closes at 9:00 pm. Please call Jim Grey at 248-540-9070 for
reservations to save your spot in a car pool. Those wishing to join us
for dinner at Deli Unique, may join us at 5:00pm.


Miedzyrzec Podlaski/Mezritch researchers #poland

MMBegun@...
 

The long standing Mezritcher Society in the New York City area will be having
its annual meeting in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn on Sunday, November 14, in the
early afternoon.

Once a very active group of Miedzyrzec Podlaski former residents who used to
meet monthly, the meetings are now attended not only by the "old-timers" but
by some of their adult children and by some younger people who were born in
Miedzyrzec Podlaski following World War 2.

If you are a Miedzryzec Podlaski (Mezritch, Lublin area, Poland) researcher,
and you live in the New York metropolitan area, you may enjoy meeting these
people and learning whether or not they are acquainted with the families you
are researching. Please contact me at MMBegun@aol.com for details. The
meeting is free, but a small donation is expected to cover costs of the lunch
that will be served.


JRI Poland #Poland Miedzyrzec Podlaski/Mezritch researchers #poland

MMBegun@...
 

The long standing Mezritcher Society in the New York City area will be having
its annual meeting in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn on Sunday, November 14, in the
early afternoon.

Once a very active group of Miedzyrzec Podlaski former residents who used to
meet monthly, the meetings are now attended not only by the "old-timers" but
by some of their adult children and by some younger people who were born in
Miedzyrzec Podlaski following World War 2.

If you are a Miedzryzec Podlaski (Mezritch, Lublin area, Poland) researcher,
and you live in the New York metropolitan area, you may enjoy meeting these
people and learning whether or not they are acquainted with the families you
are researching. Please contact me at MMBegun@aol.com for details. The
meeting is free, but a small donation is expected to cover costs of the lunch
that will be served.


Re: Delyatin #galicia

JoyceField <jfield@...>
 

David Sotkowitz wrote in part:

"...there was a Kehilla book in the hands of Rabbi Kolesnik.."
The Delyatin materials that Rabbi Kolesnik has in his possession
include a book of protocols of the Jewish Community Council, 1926.

Joyce Field
Translations Manager
Yizkor Book Project
<jfield@pop.nlci.com>


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Delyatin #galicia

JoyceField <jfield@...>
 

David Sotkowitz wrote in part:

"...there was a Kehilla book in the hands of Rabbi Kolesnik.."
The Delyatin materials that Rabbi Kolesnik has in his possession
include a book of protocols of the Jewish Community Council, 1926.

Joyce Field
Translations Manager
Yizkor Book Project
<jfield@pop.nlci.com>


Re: h-sig digest: October 22, 1999 #hungary

tom klein <tom_klein@...>
 

Norman and Jean Fuhrer - nfuhrer@iu.net wrote:

h> We received >from Yad Vashem, Hall of Names, in Jerusalem, eight
pages of
h> information, one page for each of our relatives for whom they had a
h> listing, who had perished in the Holocaust - Surname: FUHRER -
h>
h> One uncle, Moshe FUHRER married Malka Bluma FELDMAN. They had a
daughter
h> who married an Abraham MOSHKOVICH (we were under the impression
that
h> Moskowitz was his surname. All of these relatives once lived in
Ushorod,
h> then Czechoslovia (formerly Ungvar, Hungary, now Uzhgorod,
Ukraine). The
h> given name of two of the children of Moshe and Malka were Khava
and Zahava
h> (does anyone know if these are feminine or masculine names)?
h>
h> Also, the given name of my grandfather (father of twelve Fuhrer
sons) was
h> listed as Ignatz Fuhrer, by my father and his brother who both
emigrated to
h> the US. The other sons list his given name as Yitzhak. We
understand that
h> they all had the same father. Is there a connection between
Ignatz and
h> Yitzhak?
h>
h> Is anyone searching for surname MOSHKOVICH with that particular
spelling?
h>

hi,

i very much doubt that you will ever find anyone >from czechoslovakia
who spelled their name "MOSHKOVICH". (the use of "sh", as in
english, would be totally unknown.) rather, i suspect that the
document >from yad vashem is in hebrew, and someone has transcribed it
using english rules of spelling. (and, incidentally, the difference
in hebrew between "tz" and "ch" is just an apostrophe.)

in hungarian, the "s" in "MOSKOWITZ" would have been pronounced the
same as "sh" in english, and the "w" as a "v", but it would be
written "MOSKOWITZ".

regards,


....... tom klein, toronto


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: h-sig digest: October 22, 1999 #hungary

tom klein <tom_klein@...>
 

Norman and Jean Fuhrer - nfuhrer@iu.net wrote:

h> We received >from Yad Vashem, Hall of Names, in Jerusalem, eight
pages of
h> information, one page for each of our relatives for whom they had a
h> listing, who had perished in the Holocaust - Surname: FUHRER -
h>
h> One uncle, Moshe FUHRER married Malka Bluma FELDMAN. They had a
daughter
h> who married an Abraham MOSHKOVICH (we were under the impression
that
h> Moskowitz was his surname. All of these relatives once lived in
Ushorod,
h> then Czechoslovia (formerly Ungvar, Hungary, now Uzhgorod,
Ukraine). The
h> given name of two of the children of Moshe and Malka were Khava
and Zahava
h> (does anyone know if these are feminine or masculine names)?
h>
h> Also, the given name of my grandfather (father of twelve Fuhrer
sons) was
h> listed as Ignatz Fuhrer, by my father and his brother who both
emigrated to
h> the US. The other sons list his given name as Yitzhak. We
understand that
h> they all had the same father. Is there a connection between
Ignatz and
h> Yitzhak?
h>
h> Is anyone searching for surname MOSHKOVICH with that particular
spelling?
h>

hi,

i very much doubt that you will ever find anyone >from czechoslovakia
who spelled their name "MOSHKOVICH". (the use of "sh", as in
english, would be totally unknown.) rather, i suspect that the
document >from yad vashem is in hebrew, and someone has transcribed it
using english rules of spelling. (and, incidentally, the difference
in hebrew between "tz" and "ch" is just an apostrophe.)

in hungarian, the "s" in "MOSKOWITZ" would have been pronounced the
same as "sh" in english, and the "w" as a "v", but it would be
written "MOSKOWITZ".

regards,


....... tom klein, toronto


Spelling of names of Jewish personalities #general

Alex Korn <apkorn@...>
 

Hello Shlomo Zalmen Jessel,

Firstly, the correct technical name is not "tchik", but
"Tchuptchik".
(It is actually slang!) And to correct you on the modern use of
the "tchuptchik", the gimmel plus a tchuptchik produces the hard
sound of J, as in the name Jane. But a zayin plus tchuptchik
produces the soft "zh" as in the English word azure and in the
Polish city of Volozhin (Polish spelling Wolozin)
The dilemma before the invention of the tchuptchik, was
representing foreign names and words in Hebrew characters. This
is what I have witnessed in the Polish civil registration
documents: An ancestor of mine was landed with the name "KACZKA"
(pronounced Katchka), meaning duck. It was written out in Hebrew
letters in in two different ways by the same person on different
occasions. One spelling was "KUF-ALEF-SHIYIN-KUF-YUD"
which actually produces the sound "Kashki" and
"KUF-ALEF-TZADIK-KUF-YUD", which is strictly pronounced,
"Katzki". I suppose one was supposed to know that it was to be
pronounced "Katchka".

The lesson is that there was no convention of consistent
spelling. Perhaps other responders have seen similar
inconsistent usage.

ALEX P. KORN
TORONTO, CANADA

MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is closed.


Seeking Towns: Janowke and Baranov #general

Jeanne Gold <jeannegold@...>
 

I posted a few days ago, asking where these towns most likely would be
located. Unfortunately, I didn't do a good job of explaining why I'm having
problems with locating these towns and why I was asking for
guesses/suggestions/???

Keeping in mind, I do know these towns were in the Pale of Settlement (or
most likely to have been).

I also believe both of these towns are probably in modern day Ukraine.

Abraham ZUPNICK and his wife Lillian (or Leah/Lena) ??? are the subject of
my confusion.

from cousins, I've been told Abraham was born in a town near Kiev and
Lillian in a town near Odessa. (Though another cousin thought both were
from Odessa.)
I found the passenger manifest for Abraham, wife and kids. It doesn't state
where anyone was born (1900), but their last place of residence was listed
as Janowke, Russia.

In the 1920 census, one of the sons has listed as his place of birth as
Baranov, Russia.

I'm in communication with another Zupnick descendent, whose
Great-grandmother is >from Baranov, Russia. Her great-grandmother, Rose, is
the daughter of Wolf and Celia ZUPNICK.

My Abraham is the son of William and Celia ZUPNICK (most likely the same
couple, making our ancestors siblings).

I would like to find a way to research these towns more effectively in
order to determine conclusively if our 2 families are related.

Any guesses? suggestions? ideas???

As always, I thank everyone for any help provided.

Regards,

Jeanne


eMail: JeanneGold@iname.com
Home Page: http://www.gold-cousins.org/


Re: Velvel-Hebrew equivalent & Yiddish variations? #general

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

Alan DROZ (AlanXL@aol.com) wrote:
Does anyone know:
1. the Hebrew equivalent of the Yiddish name, Velvel?
Velvel is the diminutive of the Yiddish name "Vulf" (typically
spelled "Wolf" in German or Polish). "Volf" plus the Germanic
diminutive suffix "-el" creates the nickname "Velvel", i.e.
"little Vulf" (akin to "Wolfie" in English).

The Yiddish word "Vulf" means "wolf". The Hebrew calque for this
word is "Ze'ev", i.e. "Ze'ev" means "wolf" in Hebrew.


2. Whether there are any other Yiddish names which would "go with" Velvel
(like Judah Leib or Menachem Mendel for instance).
"Judah-Leib" and "Menachem-Mendel" are Hebrew-Yiddish pairs.
"Ze'ev-Volf" is the Hebrew-Yiddish pair here.

However, also note that the wolf is the symbol of the tribe of Benjamin.
Therefore, the name pair "Benjamin Volf" is a common Biblical
association.

The Hebrew names "Ze'ev" or "Benyamin" would appear only on a
religious Hebrew document, such as a ketuba or tombstone; rarely
on a secular document.


My problem is this. I have learned that my great uncle's destination as
listed on the ship manifest in 1906 was a cousin, Velvel ROSENFELD, of
Philadelphia. It is possible that in the various Philadelphia indexes
I plan on searching, this man's name could be listed as something other
than Velvel. If I know the alternate names of Velvel, I can better be
on the lookout.
97% of all East European Jewish immigrants with the Yiddish name "Wolf"
choose the American name "William". Thefore, if you're searching for
this person in American sources, look for "William" and its variants
(William -> Will -> Bill -> Billy, etc).

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>

MODERATOR NOTE: this thread is now closed.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Spelling of names of Jewish personalities #general

Alex Korn <apkorn@...>
 

Hello Shlomo Zalmen Jessel,

Firstly, the correct technical name is not "tchik", but
"Tchuptchik".
(It is actually slang!) And to correct you on the modern use of
the "tchuptchik", the gimmel plus a tchuptchik produces the hard
sound of J, as in the name Jane. But a zayin plus tchuptchik
produces the soft "zh" as in the English word azure and in the
Polish city of Volozhin (Polish spelling Wolozin)
The dilemma before the invention of the tchuptchik, was
representing foreign names and words in Hebrew characters. This
is what I have witnessed in the Polish civil registration
documents: An ancestor of mine was landed with the name "KACZKA"
(pronounced Katchka), meaning duck. It was written out in Hebrew
letters in in two different ways by the same person on different
occasions. One spelling was "KUF-ALEF-SHIYIN-KUF-YUD"
which actually produces the sound "Kashki" and
"KUF-ALEF-TZADIK-KUF-YUD", which is strictly pronounced,
"Katzki". I suppose one was supposed to know that it was to be
pronounced "Katchka".

The lesson is that there was no convention of consistent
spelling. Perhaps other responders have seen similar
inconsistent usage.

ALEX P. KORN
TORONTO, CANADA

MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is closed.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking Towns: Janowke and Baranov #general

Jeanne Gold <jeannegold@...>
 

I posted a few days ago, asking where these towns most likely would be
located. Unfortunately, I didn't do a good job of explaining why I'm having
problems with locating these towns and why I was asking for
guesses/suggestions/???

Keeping in mind, I do know these towns were in the Pale of Settlement (or
most likely to have been).

I also believe both of these towns are probably in modern day Ukraine.

Abraham ZUPNICK and his wife Lillian (or Leah/Lena) ??? are the subject of
my confusion.

from cousins, I've been told Abraham was born in a town near Kiev and
Lillian in a town near Odessa. (Though another cousin thought both were
from Odessa.)
I found the passenger manifest for Abraham, wife and kids. It doesn't state
where anyone was born (1900), but their last place of residence was listed
as Janowke, Russia.

In the 1920 census, one of the sons has listed as his place of birth as
Baranov, Russia.

I'm in communication with another Zupnick descendent, whose
Great-grandmother is >from Baranov, Russia. Her great-grandmother, Rose, is
the daughter of Wolf and Celia ZUPNICK.

My Abraham is the son of William and Celia ZUPNICK (most likely the same
couple, making our ancestors siblings).

I would like to find a way to research these towns more effectively in
order to determine conclusively if our 2 families are related.

Any guesses? suggestions? ideas???

As always, I thank everyone for any help provided.

Regards,

Jeanne


eMail: JeanneGold@iname.com
Home Page: http://www.gold-cousins.org/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Velvel-Hebrew equivalent & Yiddish variations? #general

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

Alan DROZ (AlanXL@aol.com) wrote:
Does anyone know:
1. the Hebrew equivalent of the Yiddish name, Velvel?
Velvel is the diminutive of the Yiddish name "Vulf" (typically
spelled "Wolf" in German or Polish). "Volf" plus the Germanic
diminutive suffix "-el" creates the nickname "Velvel", i.e.
"little Vulf" (akin to "Wolfie" in English).

The Yiddish word "Vulf" means "wolf". The Hebrew calque for this
word is "Ze'ev", i.e. "Ze'ev" means "wolf" in Hebrew.


2. Whether there are any other Yiddish names which would "go with" Velvel
(like Judah Leib or Menachem Mendel for instance).
"Judah-Leib" and "Menachem-Mendel" are Hebrew-Yiddish pairs.
"Ze'ev-Volf" is the Hebrew-Yiddish pair here.

However, also note that the wolf is the symbol of the tribe of Benjamin.
Therefore, the name pair "Benjamin Volf" is a common Biblical
association.

The Hebrew names "Ze'ev" or "Benyamin" would appear only on a
religious Hebrew document, such as a ketuba or tombstone; rarely
on a secular document.


My problem is this. I have learned that my great uncle's destination as
listed on the ship manifest in 1906 was a cousin, Velvel ROSENFELD, of
Philadelphia. It is possible that in the various Philadelphia indexes
I plan on searching, this man's name could be listed as something other
than Velvel. If I know the alternate names of Velvel, I can better be
on the lookout.
97% of all East European Jewish immigrants with the Yiddish name "Wolf"
choose the American name "William". Thefore, if you're searching for
this person in American sources, look for "William" and its variants
(William -> Will -> Bill -> Billy, etc).

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>

MODERATOR NOTE: this thread is now closed.