Date   

Family Names #poland #lodz

JRoss54844@...
 

Fellow landsman >from Lodz:

My grandmother, Sara Ryfka CHAJMOWICZ was born in Piotrikow Trybanalski in
1901. However, her parents, Abram CHAJMOWICZ and Chaja Frajdla ENGEL, were
from two wealthy Lodz families, who raised her after both of her parents
died at a young age. I have not been able to develop much research into
either family because I do not yet know her grandparents names. I expect
that the PSA project currently underway may reveal these to me.

My grandfather, Jacob Joseph KNOP, came >from the other side of the tracks.
His father's family, the KNOPs, originated in Restarzew, a tiny village
near to Szczercow. They migrated to Szczercow itself, and >from there they
moved to Zgierz about 1848. My grandfather's father, Abram Izaak KNOP, was
born in Zgierz and married my great grandmother, Sara LEJBOWICZ about 1883
(registered 1891) and had five children. It was her second marriage. Her
first was to a Szlama MOSZKOWICZ, and they had about five children
together.
The LEJBOWICZ family were old timers in Lodz. Sara's parents, Enoch
LEJBOWICZ/CHAJOT and Faige ARONOWICZ, were married in Lodz in 1839. I am
currently researching these records.

My most recent research was not possible without the recent additions to
the indexes >from the LDS records and the PSA records. Many thanks to both
Morris Wirth and Shirley Flaum and their teams for their work.

Joe Ross
Bala Cynwyd, PA


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Family Names #lodz #poland

JRoss54844@...
 

Fellow landsman >from Lodz:

My grandmother, Sara Ryfka CHAJMOWICZ was born in Piotrikow Trybanalski in
1901. However, her parents, Abram CHAJMOWICZ and Chaja Frajdla ENGEL, were
from two wealthy Lodz families, who raised her after both of her parents
died at a young age. I have not been able to develop much research into
either family because I do not yet know her grandparents names. I expect
that the PSA project currently underway may reveal these to me.

My grandfather, Jacob Joseph KNOP, came >from the other side of the tracks.
His father's family, the KNOPs, originated in Restarzew, a tiny village
near to Szczercow. They migrated to Szczercow itself, and >from there they
moved to Zgierz about 1848. My grandfather's father, Abram Izaak KNOP, was
born in Zgierz and married my great grandmother, Sara LEJBOWICZ about 1883
(registered 1891) and had five children. It was her second marriage. Her
first was to a Szlama MOSZKOWICZ, and they had about five children
together.
The LEJBOWICZ family were old timers in Lodz. Sara's parents, Enoch
LEJBOWICZ/CHAJOT and Faige ARONOWICZ, were married in Lodz in 1839. I am
currently researching these records.

My most recent research was not possible without the recent additions to
the indexes >from the LDS records and the PSA records. Many thanks to both
Morris Wirth and Shirley Flaum and their teams for their work.

Joe Ross
Bala Cynwyd, PA


TALALAY reunion report #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Dear Genners:
We are still on a high after our gathering of various TALALAY
branches in Tel Aviv last night.
A nicer group of people could not be found! Fascinating,
interesting (and interested) people >from Beersheva to TA to Hod HaSharon
to Lod to Carmiel. Most arriving with photos and their own lists,
interacting almost immediately in Russian, Hebrew and English.
Several branches had been doing some work independently (unknown
to each other) and now we can update and combine the various research.
While the adults got along very well, and the interaction was
almost immediate, it was the younger cousins (10-22) who seemed to have a
great time as well, meeting relatives outside of their own personal
immediate family for the first time.
It was the suggestion of several that we make sure to get
everyone's full contact details (which I have done, as well as emails!)
and one group has already said they also wanted to invite the family.
Lots of TALALAY are in the computer field. Cousin Rina said she
will scan photos and send them to me (still don't have all my equipment up
and running) and I will plug them into my Family Tree Maker files.
Cooperation is the name of the game. Cousin Boris came armed with a list
of TALALAY through an internet search (he had already found my
MyFamily.Com Talalay site under construction) and his mother brought
photos.
The enlargements I made of my small working charts (hand-drawn on
architect's paper, as opposed to FTM printed charts) were taken by the
various branches to update and work on. Several of the younger kids were
very interested in their branch charts for the family tree contest
sponsored by Bet Hatfutzot (Musem of the Diaspora, TA), to be completely
updated by them with much more new and accurate information. Bet
Hatfutzot: be prepared for the TALALAY invasion!
We compared photos of various branches, observing resemblances in
people who attended with photos of other relatives in other branches
taken many decades ago.
All-in-all, it was a wonderful evening. As we told everyone, this
is only the first, not the last, of our meetings.
Best to all. The only downer was that we did not do this sooner,
and I found out last night, that just two months ago we lost the senior
member, a direct descendent of one of the branches, of one of the
Mogilev branches. The moral of the story is "DO NOT WAIT TO GET
TOGETHER!"
Best regards to all,
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv, Israel
dardasht@barak-online.net


Re: Nahum Moshe #general

Joanglas@...
 

My grandparents came >from the Ukraine and I have traced relationships
through the given names of Rifke and Gerson handed down through
generations. There were no Nahum Moshes and I would guess that this name
is passed down through your family.

Joan Glasner
NYC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen TALALAY reunion report #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Dear Genners:
We are still on a high after our gathering of various TALALAY
branches in Tel Aviv last night.
A nicer group of people could not be found! Fascinating,
interesting (and interested) people >from Beersheva to TA to Hod HaSharon
to Lod to Carmiel. Most arriving with photos and their own lists,
interacting almost immediately in Russian, Hebrew and English.
Several branches had been doing some work independently (unknown
to each other) and now we can update and combine the various research.
While the adults got along very well, and the interaction was
almost immediate, it was the younger cousins (10-22) who seemed to have a
great time as well, meeting relatives outside of their own personal
immediate family for the first time.
It was the suggestion of several that we make sure to get
everyone's full contact details (which I have done, as well as emails!)
and one group has already said they also wanted to invite the family.
Lots of TALALAY are in the computer field. Cousin Rina said she
will scan photos and send them to me (still don't have all my equipment up
and running) and I will plug them into my Family Tree Maker files.
Cooperation is the name of the game. Cousin Boris came armed with a list
of TALALAY through an internet search (he had already found my
MyFamily.Com Talalay site under construction) and his mother brought
photos.
The enlargements I made of my small working charts (hand-drawn on
architect's paper, as opposed to FTM printed charts) were taken by the
various branches to update and work on. Several of the younger kids were
very interested in their branch charts for the family tree contest
sponsored by Bet Hatfutzot (Musem of the Diaspora, TA), to be completely
updated by them with much more new and accurate information. Bet
Hatfutzot: be prepared for the TALALAY invasion!
We compared photos of various branches, observing resemblances in
people who attended with photos of other relatives in other branches
taken many decades ago.
All-in-all, it was a wonderful evening. As we told everyone, this
is only the first, not the last, of our meetings.
Best to all. The only downer was that we did not do this sooner,
and I found out last night, that just two months ago we lost the senior
member, a direct descendent of one of the branches, of one of the
Mogilev branches. The moral of the story is "DO NOT WAIT TO GET
TOGETHER!"
Best regards to all,
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv, Israel
dardasht@barak-online.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Nahum Moshe #general

Joanglas@...
 

My grandparents came >from the Ukraine and I have traced relationships
through the given names of Rifke and Gerson handed down through
generations. There were no Nahum Moshes and I would guess that this name
is passed down through your family.

Joan Glasner
NYC


AEJordan@aol.com ... you may want to check your settings #general

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

Sorry to use the Digest for this but there doesn't seem to be another
way. When catching up on old Digests I tried to send you a message about
an old thread and got the following message:
<<< 550 AEJordan IS NOT ACCEPTING MAIL >from THIS SENDER
I remembered that this has happened to me when trying to send messages
to you in the past. I did some checking around and discovered that I am
not the only person whose messages are being rejected -- in fact, a
"lurker" tried who had never posted tried and his message was rejected
too. You may want to change your email address settings; people are
trying to get you more information privately and not succeeding. (P.S.
You may want to check the JG Archives under "cold calls to relatives".)

Jonina Duker


Re: Polish word for Stranger #general

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

Ger is the Hebrew, not Polish name for stranger or foreigner.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

Your Name wrote:

Today I connected with a long lost Gerrick cousin who explained how
we got the name Gerrkovich which wasn't our real name at all.
My mgggrandfather was >from Lithuania and his name was Levinstein.
He got into trouble with the authorities and fled the country.
He then settled in Warsaw and changed his name. He was a stranger in
Poland so he took the word for stanger and added kovich to it.
And he got his knew name.

If someone can tell me how to spell the word for "stranger" in Polish
then I can hopefully spell the name correctly.


ZETTLIN &JOSEPH:Berlin, 1943 #general

Thekla1
 

Heinz Joseph and Ingrid Joseph nee Zettlin were born in Berlin, Germany
in 1919 and 1923. Just before being deported to Auschwitz in 1943, they
had a son who survived Theresianstadt. He became my cousin by adoption
after The War. He wanted to know if he could have possibly had any
relatives who survived but died without being able to find out the
answer. In his memory, I am trying to find any members of his family.
Any help would be appreciated.
Thekla Stein Nordwind


Search using maiden names #general

Mike Fischer <miketran@...>
 

Yesterday, I received an e-mail >from a 1st cousin that I have not been
in contact with for over 30 yrs. Not knowing her married name, ( I
assumed she was married), I looked on the People Finder and found a
person I thought might be her. It was the middle initial that gave me
hope. I wrote her a letter, explaining that this was a long shot, but I
knew that some women went under their maiden name for professional reasons
or if they are divorced. Bingo! She was very happy to hear >from me and
gave me a short update on this branch of the family. She gave me her
parents address and this will open a lot of new opportunities to find many
other relatives.
She said we had distant cousins in Cuba, Argentina and Canada. I have
already e-mailed 3 people who are looking for the same surname in Canada.
Her parents are in contact with the Florida relatives, that I have been
trying to find.

Wilma Fischer
Passaic, N.J.


Re: Adrienne Millon are you out there? #general

RobinnM@...
 

Dear JewishGen readers:

I have recently lost contact with a wonderful Lublin Landsman named
Adrienne Millon whose address and email seem to have changed. Please
contact me if you know how I might reach her... and yes, I checked my
addressbook against the JGFamilyFinder and apparently she has moved.

Thanks,
Robinn Magid
Kensington, California
RobinnM@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen AEJordan@aol.com ... you may want to check your settings #general

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

Sorry to use the Digest for this but there doesn't seem to be another
way. When catching up on old Digests I tried to send you a message about
an old thread and got the following message:
<<< 550 AEJordan IS NOT ACCEPTING MAIL >from THIS SENDER
I remembered that this has happened to me when trying to send messages
to you in the past. I did some checking around and discovered that I am
not the only person whose messages are being rejected -- in fact, a
"lurker" tried who had never posted tried and his message was rejected
too. You may want to change your email address settings; people are
trying to get you more information privately and not succeeding. (P.S.
You may want to check the JG Archives under "cold calls to relatives".)

Jonina Duker


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Polish word for Stranger #general

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

Ger is the Hebrew, not Polish name for stranger or foreigner.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

Your Name wrote:

Today I connected with a long lost Gerrick cousin who explained how
we got the name Gerrkovich which wasn't our real name at all.
My mgggrandfather was >from Lithuania and his name was Levinstein.
He got into trouble with the authorities and fled the country.
He then settled in Warsaw and changed his name. He was a stranger in
Poland so he took the word for stanger and added kovich to it.
And he got his knew name.

If someone can tell me how to spell the word for "stranger" in Polish
then I can hopefully spell the name correctly.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ZETTLIN &JOSEPH:Berlin, 1943 #general

Thekla1
 

Heinz Joseph and Ingrid Joseph nee Zettlin were born in Berlin, Germany
in 1919 and 1923. Just before being deported to Auschwitz in 1943, they
had a son who survived Theresianstadt. He became my cousin by adoption
after The War. He wanted to know if he could have possibly had any
relatives who survived but died without being able to find out the
answer. In his memory, I am trying to find any members of his family.
Any help would be appreciated.
Thekla Stein Nordwind


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Search using maiden names #general

Mike Fischer <miketran@...>
 

Yesterday, I received an e-mail >from a 1st cousin that I have not been
in contact with for over 30 yrs. Not knowing her married name, ( I
assumed she was married), I looked on the People Finder and found a
person I thought might be her. It was the middle initial that gave me
hope. I wrote her a letter, explaining that this was a long shot, but I
knew that some women went under their maiden name for professional reasons
or if they are divorced. Bingo! She was very happy to hear >from me and
gave me a short update on this branch of the family. She gave me her
parents address and this will open a lot of new opportunities to find many
other relatives.
She said we had distant cousins in Cuba, Argentina and Canada. I have
already e-mailed 3 people who are looking for the same surname in Canada.
Her parents are in contact with the Florida relatives, that I have been
trying to find.

Wilma Fischer
Passaic, N.J.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Adrienne Millon are you out there? #general

RobinnM@...
 

Dear JewishGen readers:

I have recently lost contact with a wonderful Lublin Landsman named
Adrienne Millon whose address and email seem to have changed. Please
contact me if you know how I might reach her... and yes, I checked my
addressbook against the JGFamilyFinder and apparently she has moved.

Thanks,
Robinn Magid
Kensington, California
RobinnM@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


Elderly Survivors #general

Rakoff125
 

I would like to add another voice to the topic. I think it is an
important mitxvah to hear what these people have to say. Not for
genealogical reasons but humanitarian ones. I urge those who work with
these people not to hasten their stories for data but to listen, for
that is what is most needed. A good reference book on talking for seniors
is Barbara Meyerhoff's book "Number Our Days". It is very important to
have a chance to review one's life, to recover, to remember in the sense
of restoration of treasured memories, to mourn, to be able to bear with
supportive respect what one will.

I remember the enormous pleasure it gave my grandmother to tell me
stories of her childhood, so that she could savor treasured recollections
of the past. Perhaps this one on one approach might be made availble for
volunteers who would like to tell about their lives; high school students
doing community service projects make excellent partners for listening
and recording/transcribing the stories.

Another way of doing this would be with trained volunteers or social
work group leaders who could run groups for seniors in centers, homes
and assisted living facilities. Some volunteers at my Temple (Temple
Reyim of Newton) have committed themselves to running Shabbat and holiday
services at a local nursing home. Perhaps congregants and mature local
students can run time limited groups (like 6 sessions) to give people a
chance to talk and then, after the series, offer those who wish to
participate, work with these people to record their stories of Jewish
life, introduce them to genealogy, and assist as needed. It's just a
thought.

Linda Rakoff
Newton, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Elderly Survivors #general

Rakoff125
 

I would like to add another voice to the topic. I think it is an
important mitxvah to hear what these people have to say. Not for
genealogical reasons but humanitarian ones. I urge those who work with
these people not to hasten their stories for data but to listen, for
that is what is most needed. A good reference book on talking for seniors
is Barbara Meyerhoff's book "Number Our Days". It is very important to
have a chance to review one's life, to recover, to remember in the sense
of restoration of treasured memories, to mourn, to be able to bear with
supportive respect what one will.

I remember the enormous pleasure it gave my grandmother to tell me
stories of her childhood, so that she could savor treasured recollections
of the past. Perhaps this one on one approach might be made availble for
volunteers who would like to tell about their lives; high school students
doing community service projects make excellent partners for listening
and recording/transcribing the stories.

Another way of doing this would be with trained volunteers or social
work group leaders who could run groups for seniors in centers, homes
and assisted living facilities. Some volunteers at my Temple (Temple
Reyim of Newton) have committed themselves to running Shabbat and holiday
services at a local nursing home. Perhaps congregants and mature local
students can run time limited groups (like 6 sessions) to give people a
chance to talk and then, after the series, offer those who wish to
participate, work with these people to record their stories of Jewish
life, introduce them to genealogy, and assist as needed. It's just a
thought.

Linda Rakoff
Newton, MA


ShtetLinks Report, January, 2000 #general

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

No Y2K problem here! ShtetLinks has increased the number of shtetlach
up and listed, as well as reserved, to a breathtaking 467. Amongst our
updates and new pages this month are our new Suchostav Region Research
Group pages, listing some 14 shtetlach within a 25 mile radius of
Suchostav. They are still looking for people to work on the remaining
dozen or so places within that circle. Our very impressive Lodz site
continues to grow and expand. Pavlovich and Tuchin, Ukraine, and
Meretch and Ushpol, Lithuania are among other new sites added in
January. We continue to invite all who are interested in commemorating
their ancestral homes to contact us at shtetl-help@jewishgen.org and we
will do what we can.

As with all groups, we continue to be short on volunteer help. We can
use volunteer site checkers. These people check a site after the files
are uploaded to JewishGen and make sure links work and the pages are
ready for prime time. If you are interested, contact me.

See you at ShtetLinks!

Chuck Weinstein
JewishGen ShtetLinks Project Manager
cweinstein@jewishgen.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ShtetLinks Report, January, 2000 #general

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

No Y2K problem here! ShtetLinks has increased the number of shtetlach
up and listed, as well as reserved, to a breathtaking 467. Amongst our
updates and new pages this month are our new Suchostav Region Research
Group pages, listing some 14 shtetlach within a 25 mile radius of
Suchostav. They are still looking for people to work on the remaining
dozen or so places within that circle. Our very impressive Lodz site
continues to grow and expand. Pavlovich and Tuchin, Ukraine, and
Meretch and Ushpol, Lithuania are among other new sites added in
January. We continue to invite all who are interested in commemorating
their ancestral homes to contact us at shtetl-help@jewishgen.org and we
will do what we can.

As with all groups, we continue to be short on volunteer help. We can
use volunteer site checkers. These people check a site after the files
are uploaded to JewishGen and make sure links work and the pages are
ready for prime time. If you are interested, contact me.

See you at ShtetLinks!

Chuck Weinstein
JewishGen ShtetLinks Project Manager
cweinstein@jewishgen.org