Date   

Lebanese names... #general

tomer levi <hstom@...>
 

Does anyone heard of the name "Anzarut" ?. I think its Halebi origin. I
need information on the Anzarut who immigrated to Beirut.


Re: Russia to Poland? (1906) #general

Gene and Ellen Sucov <genellen@...>
 

Dear Daniel, Improbable as it sounds these things happened all the time.
My case in point.
My gfather left the little town of Zareby-Koscielne (in Poland, halfway
between Warsaw and Bialystok) in 1902 for the US, leaving behind his wife
and 4 kids. She arrived with the kids now ages 11-18 in the US to join him
in 1913!! I don't know how she lived during those 11 years, who helped
her,how did she travel with these kids by herself, etc. She never talked
aboutit and I never asked my mother or gmother about it. My loss. Lots of
quietheroism in those days were taken for granted as the price for freedom.
Gene Sucov searching for
SUCHOWCZYCKI, Horodetz-Bialystok-US
SHLAFMITZ, Zaremby-Koscielne-US

----- Original Message -----
From: Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
To: JewishGen Discussion Group <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2000 9:07 PM
Subject: Russia to Poland? (1906)


How easy was it to travel >from Russia to Poland in about 1906?

A family story that has been passed down for years explains the
details on one branch of my family tree. It involves a woman
and her two children traveling >from Minsk or Pinsk to
Czestochowa Poland in the early 1900s. But I thought this
wasn't really possible?!

I've put the story below. Please, if anyone knows, let me know
if these details are compatible with the problems of travel in
the early 1900s.

[As told by a cousin of mine.]
My great grandmother lived in Minsk or Pinsk. She
married, had two kids (1904 and 1905), and then her
husband maybe died, or left her, or went to the USA.
Next, she moved to Czestochowa and married a man (after
1905). They had no kids together. Her new husband
traveled to the USA in 1913 and she followed, along with
the two kids, in 1920.

Let me know if you can help me understand this family story.
It's not that I really doubt its source, it's just that
I thought travel wasn't possible like that in the early 1900s.

Dan


Re: NYC school called Moms? #general

JandJMama <jandjmama@...>
 

I taught at Morris High School in the "60's. It is located, I believe on
Boston Road in the Bronx. I think it is the oldest, public, coed High
School in the city. It was built around 1904. I hope this helps.
Maralyn Klein


overseas arranged marriages #general

Dara Pearlman <pearlman99@...>
 

Does anyone know of instances of arranged
marriages in the late 19th/early 20th centuries that
required the bride to travel >from eastern Europe to
the United States to meet her intended?
In my family tradition, my great-grandmother (Ida
Yanklowitz) traveled >from Lithuania circa 1889 to join
her future husband (Benjamin Mordecai Rome) in
Baltimore. The story says she was only 16 years old
at the time, and that she lived with the groom's
family for a year or two before the marriage.
I'm very curious to know if this was a commonplace
arrangement.

Dara Pearlman
Cupertino, California


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lebanese names... #general

tomer levi <hstom@...>
 

Does anyone heard of the name "Anzarut" ?. I think its Halebi origin. I
need information on the Anzarut who immigrated to Beirut.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russia to Poland? (1906) #general

Gene and Ellen Sucov <genellen@...>
 

Dear Daniel, Improbable as it sounds these things happened all the time.
My case in point.
My gfather left the little town of Zareby-Koscielne (in Poland, halfway
between Warsaw and Bialystok) in 1902 for the US, leaving behind his wife
and 4 kids. She arrived with the kids now ages 11-18 in the US to join him
in 1913!! I don't know how she lived during those 11 years, who helped
her,how did she travel with these kids by herself, etc. She never talked
aboutit and I never asked my mother or gmother about it. My loss. Lots of
quietheroism in those days were taken for granted as the price for freedom.
Gene Sucov searching for
SUCHOWCZYCKI, Horodetz-Bialystok-US
SHLAFMITZ, Zaremby-Koscielne-US

----- Original Message -----
From: Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
To: JewishGen Discussion Group <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2000 9:07 PM
Subject: Russia to Poland? (1906)


How easy was it to travel >from Russia to Poland in about 1906?

A family story that has been passed down for years explains the
details on one branch of my family tree. It involves a woman
and her two children traveling >from Minsk or Pinsk to
Czestochowa Poland in the early 1900s. But I thought this
wasn't really possible?!

I've put the story below. Please, if anyone knows, let me know
if these details are compatible with the problems of travel in
the early 1900s.

[As told by a cousin of mine.]
My great grandmother lived in Minsk or Pinsk. She
married, had two kids (1904 and 1905), and then her
husband maybe died, or left her, or went to the USA.
Next, she moved to Czestochowa and married a man (after
1905). They had no kids together. Her new husband
traveled to the USA in 1913 and she followed, along with
the two kids, in 1920.

Let me know if you can help me understand this family story.
It's not that I really doubt its source, it's just that
I thought travel wasn't possible like that in the early 1900s.

Dan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NYC school called Moms? #general

JandJMama <jandjmama@...>
 

I taught at Morris High School in the "60's. It is located, I believe on
Boston Road in the Bronx. I think it is the oldest, public, coed High
School in the city. It was built around 1904. I hope this helps.
Maralyn Klein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen overseas arranged marriages #general

Dara Pearlman <pearlman99@...>
 

Does anyone know of instances of arranged
marriages in the late 19th/early 20th centuries that
required the bride to travel >from eastern Europe to
the United States to meet her intended?
In my family tradition, my great-grandmother (Ida
Yanklowitz) traveled >from Lithuania circa 1889 to join
her future husband (Benjamin Mordecai Rome) in
Baltimore. The story says she was only 16 years old
at the time, and that she lived with the groom's
family for a year or two before the marriage.
I'm very curious to know if this was a commonplace
arrangement.

Dara Pearlman
Cupertino, California


Re: How do you say Happy Mother's Day in Hungarian? #hungary

Andrew Foti <fotifoti@...>
 

Hello David Deutsch :


This is what you may say to your Mother :

BOLDOG ANYAK NAPJAT KIVANOK. (I whish you Happy Mother's Day)


Regards,

Andrew Foti


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: How do you say Happy Mother's Day in Hungarian? #hungary

Andrew Foti <fotifoti@...>
 

Hello David Deutsch :


This is what you may say to your Mother :

BOLDOG ANYAK NAPJAT KIVANOK. (I whish you Happy Mother's Day)


Regards,

Andrew Foti


YAD VASHEM - updates and success #hungary

Tomer Brunner <tomerbr@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,

Last week I visited the Yad VaShem Archive and I would like to share my
Experience.
The room where the researchers work has many Computer work stations, wide
desks and also shelves with books of general interest, for example: Yizkor
books, Atlases, books with lists (Nevek- names of jewish victims of
Hungarian labour battalions; Bergen-Belsen : list of inhabitants) And much
more.
from that room you reach another one where you give (and receive) yours
archive material orders and where microfilm readers are.

THE COMPUTER SYSTEM
As you know, besides the museum, Yad VaShem has a library, archive and the
Hall Of Names (where the pages of testimony are been kept).
After months of work the collection of pages of testimony (PT) were
computerized.
If you want to view a specific PT you can do it in the Hall of names or >from
THE ARCHIVE’s computer Which is connected by Intranet to the Hall Of Names’s
computer.

from the same computer you can check what material is available in the
archive and the library.
You can also check their PHOTO ARCHIVE and view THE ACTUAL photos on
the screen! – There are many family photos there with no names and I think
its very important to try identifying those people before there’s no one who
can do it.

They also made a “LIST OF LISTS” which is a list of lists >from the archive.
I suggest not to use it as the only source for lists but to check the all
archival material since there are many lists which are part of testimonies,
books and other material which aren't included in the “List of lists”. (I
think that the LOL is based on material which is lists only)

NOTE:
1) Some of the archival material is NOT for public use (don't know
whether its regular or temporary situation)
2) there is more than one search engines (the newest for the PT and
the photo archive and the old one For the archive and library) and
the older is not easy to use.
So always ask the workers there to help you. I find them very nice
and willing To help.

Pages Of Testimony - SEARCH TIPS & BUGS

There are many criterions to search by, like: Surname, first name, maiden
name, Town of birth, of residence or of death etc…
You can also use also an ADVANCED SEARCH with name of submitter of the PT
and years of submitting.
Search can be done by Exact spelling, by phonetic, by synonym or by other
ways.
from my experience, the synonym is the best but sometimes the phonetic will
give more results.
For Hebrew speakers: always try to search by Latin letters too!

NOTE: when you set it to whatever kind of search and click the “submit”
button you can view the results. When you click the search button again, in
order to type another name – MAKE SURE to re – set the search type because
it might change automatically back to the “Exact spelling” (default).

When you find an interesting name and view the PT you get a scanning of the
actual PT on the screen. If you can’t read the handwriting you can click on
the “General Information” button on the top of the page and see the typed
information >from the PT.
HERE IS WHERE ALL THE PROBLEMS START……

The information on that page was entered by volunteers which sometimes made
mistakes. The problem is that the search engines are based on this typed
information (and not on the handwritten PT) and that causes some problems.
Here are some examples >from my experience:

1) Name of victim mistyped – “UKER” instead of “DRUKER”.
2) Name of town mistyped – “BereKovo” “ “ “BereHovo”.

Sometimes the handwriting is not clear so mistakes are inevitable but
sometimes because the PT are written in many different languages and the
volunteers who entered the info aren’t familiar with all, problems like the
following aren’t rare:

1) if the submitter wrote in the town of birth
“ (name of town), UNGVAR megye” the volunteer might have
typed “ town = Ungvar”

2) some times the submitter wrote “victims name = SCHWARTZ IMRE”
and in the “wife name = Schwartz Imrene’ “
In this case the volunteer might write “wife’s name = Imrene’ “

Also, sometimes the handwriting is clear but the volunteer, for some reason,
mistakes In typing . not that only but they also don’t type remarks made by
the submitter, like:
“Death = in Auschwitz by …or “ In Austria after walking >from ….” or “ as
written in the book…”

In order not to miss any detail one should read both the actual page and the
typed info.
You can have the handwritten page printed (it costs 3 NIS for each page).
Photos can also be printed (but it cost more).

So, after learning about the above problems you understand why its important
to search not only by a town or victim’s name but also by submitter’s name.

If you have luck, like I deed, you should take a whole day and a lot of
paper For the visit there. I have found more then 80 relatives listed there
in only 2 days of work!

GENERAL INFO
1) The archive is open >from 9:00 to 17:00 (Fridays – 9:00 to
14:00) but archival
material can be ordered until 15:00.
2) It take about 10 minutes to get there by bus >from the central
station.


In case you don’t have much time to visit there – Don’t worry, until the end
of the year they plan to connect their local net to the internet!

Hope it helps,
Tomer Brunner, Israel.
________________________________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free E-mail >from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary YAD VASHEM - updates and success #hungary

Tomer Brunner <tomerbr@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,

Last week I visited the Yad VaShem Archive and I would like to share my
Experience.
The room where the researchers work has many Computer work stations, wide
desks and also shelves with books of general interest, for example: Yizkor
books, Atlases, books with lists (Nevek- names of jewish victims of
Hungarian labour battalions; Bergen-Belsen : list of inhabitants) And much
more.
from that room you reach another one where you give (and receive) yours
archive material orders and where microfilm readers are.

THE COMPUTER SYSTEM
As you know, besides the museum, Yad VaShem has a library, archive and the
Hall Of Names (where the pages of testimony are been kept).
After months of work the collection of pages of testimony (PT) were
computerized.
If you want to view a specific PT you can do it in the Hall of names or >from
THE ARCHIVE’s computer Which is connected by Intranet to the Hall Of Names’s
computer.

from the same computer you can check what material is available in the
archive and the library.
You can also check their PHOTO ARCHIVE and view THE ACTUAL photos on
the screen! – There are many family photos there with no names and I think
its very important to try identifying those people before there’s no one who
can do it.

They also made a “LIST OF LISTS” which is a list of lists >from the archive.
I suggest not to use it as the only source for lists but to check the all
archival material since there are many lists which are part of testimonies,
books and other material which aren't included in the “List of lists”. (I
think that the LOL is based on material which is lists only)

NOTE:
1) Some of the archival material is NOT for public use (don't know
whether its regular or temporary situation)
2) there is more than one search engines (the newest for the PT and
the photo archive and the old one For the archive and library) and
the older is not easy to use.
So always ask the workers there to help you. I find them very nice
and willing To help.

Pages Of Testimony - SEARCH TIPS & BUGS

There are many criterions to search by, like: Surname, first name, maiden
name, Town of birth, of residence or of death etc…
You can also use also an ADVANCED SEARCH with name of submitter of the PT
and years of submitting.
Search can be done by Exact spelling, by phonetic, by synonym or by other
ways.
from my experience, the synonym is the best but sometimes the phonetic will
give more results.
For Hebrew speakers: always try to search by Latin letters too!

NOTE: when you set it to whatever kind of search and click the “submit”
button you can view the results. When you click the search button again, in
order to type another name – MAKE SURE to re – set the search type because
it might change automatically back to the “Exact spelling” (default).

When you find an interesting name and view the PT you get a scanning of the
actual PT on the screen. If you can’t read the handwriting you can click on
the “General Information” button on the top of the page and see the typed
information >from the PT.
HERE IS WHERE ALL THE PROBLEMS START……

The information on that page was entered by volunteers which sometimes made
mistakes. The problem is that the search engines are based on this typed
information (and not on the handwritten PT) and that causes some problems.
Here are some examples >from my experience:

1) Name of victim mistyped – “UKER” instead of “DRUKER”.
2) Name of town mistyped – “BereKovo” “ “ “BereHovo”.

Sometimes the handwriting is not clear so mistakes are inevitable but
sometimes because the PT are written in many different languages and the
volunteers who entered the info aren’t familiar with all, problems like the
following aren’t rare:

1) if the submitter wrote in the town of birth
“ (name of town), UNGVAR megye” the volunteer might have
typed “ town = Ungvar”

2) some times the submitter wrote “victims name = SCHWARTZ IMRE”
and in the “wife name = Schwartz Imrene’ “
In this case the volunteer might write “wife’s name = Imrene’ “

Also, sometimes the handwriting is clear but the volunteer, for some reason,
mistakes In typing . not that only but they also don’t type remarks made by
the submitter, like:
“Death = in Auschwitz by …or “ In Austria after walking >from ….” or “ as
written in the book…”

In order not to miss any detail one should read both the actual page and the
typed info.
You can have the handwritten page printed (it costs 3 NIS for each page).
Photos can also be printed (but it cost more).

So, after learning about the above problems you understand why its important
to search not only by a town or victim’s name but also by submitter’s name.

If you have luck, like I deed, you should take a whole day and a lot of
paper For the visit there. I have found more then 80 relatives listed there
in only 2 days of work!

GENERAL INFO
1) The archive is open >from 9:00 to 17:00 (Fridays – 9:00 to
14:00) but archival
material can be ordered until 15:00.
2) It take about 10 minutes to get there by bus >from the central
station.


In case you don’t have much time to visit there – Don’t worry, until the end
of the year they plan to connect their local net to the internet!

Hope it helps,
Tomer Brunner, Israel.
________________________________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free E-mail >from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com


Re: Furriers' Union #general

Diane Jacobs <kingart@...>
 

That would be wonderful as several members of my
family were furriers in New York City.
Diane Jacobs
New York

Recently I posted a note about a furriers' union in New York and have
received several requests for information. As soon as I receive a copy
of the union book >from my father I will post its contents. It should be
quite interesting!

Matt Friedman


polish name of LANDSTAEDT near WIELUN/LODZ??? #general

Dieter Charchot <dconline@...>
 

thanks
Dieter


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Furriers' Union #general

Diane Jacobs <kingart@...>
 

That would be wonderful as several members of my
family were furriers in New York City.
Diane Jacobs
New York

Recently I posted a note about a furriers' union in New York and have
received several requests for information. As soon as I receive a copy
of the union book >from my father I will post its contents. It should be
quite interesting!

Matt Friedman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen polish name of LANDSTAEDT near WIELUN/LODZ??? #general

Dieter Charchot <dconline@...>
 

thanks
Dieter


Re: Illinitzer K.U.V. #general

Susan&David
 

K.U.V. stands for the Yiddish words "Kranken Unterstitzungs Verein" and
mean Sick Benevolent Society.

Jewishgen's Shtetleseeker finds many towns named Ilintsy or equivalent,
however one particular Ilintsy, with a New York K.U.V is probably yours..

Ilintsy is/was a town in Vinnitsa province, Ukaraine. The records of the
Ilinitzer K.U.V. founded in 1895, are held by YIVO. The Ilinitzer or
(Elinitzer) K.U.V. is listed in "A Guide to YIVO's Landsmanshaftn Archive"
by Schwartz & Milamed.

David Rosen
Boton, MA


KPeter3434@aol.com wrote:

Hello,
Can anybody tell me what Illinitzer K.U.V. refers to? It is a burial
society.Would Illinitz be the name of a town or a Chasidic group perhaps?
And what does K.U.V. stand for?

Thanks in advance. If you respond to to group, please copy
to me privately as well. Thanks!

Judy Petersen
<KPeter3434@aol.com>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Illinitzer K.U.V. #general

Susan&David
 

K.U.V. stands for the Yiddish words "Kranken Unterstitzungs Verein" and
mean Sick Benevolent Society.

Jewishgen's Shtetleseeker finds many towns named Ilintsy or equivalent,
however one particular Ilintsy, with a New York K.U.V is probably yours..

Ilintsy is/was a town in Vinnitsa province, Ukaraine. The records of the
Ilinitzer K.U.V. founded in 1895, are held by YIVO. The Ilinitzer or
(Elinitzer) K.U.V. is listed in "A Guide to YIVO's Landsmanshaftn Archive"
by Schwartz & Milamed.

David Rosen
Boton, MA


KPeter3434@aol.com wrote:

Hello,
Can anybody tell me what Illinitzer K.U.V. refers to? It is a burial
society.Would Illinitz be the name of a town or a Chasidic group perhaps?
And what does K.U.V. stand for?

Thanks in advance. If you respond to to group, please copy
to me privately as well. Thanks!

Judy Petersen
<KPeter3434@aol.com>


Councilman at Salt Lake City in 1940's #general

Jack Katz
 

I have learned that a RIMMER relative was a councilman at Salt Lake City
in the 1940's, apparently influential in the city's affairs.

Does this tie in with any JGenners?

Jack

Jack Katz
London, England
jack@katzy.org

FLASTER: New York/Anywhere GROSS: Tarnopol/Trembowla/Vienna/NY
GRUTCH: Lomazy (Lemas) IANCOVICI YANKOVITCH JANKOVITCH: Dorohoi
KATZ: Lomazy (Lemas)/Novorosisk NEUSCHULER: Tarnopol/Trembowla/Vienna
NEWMAN / NEUMAN: New York PREGER: Poland (?Kalisch)
RIMMER: Bessarabia (?Belz)
SCHAFFER / SHEFFER: Dorohoi


from T. Zasloff, addition to Re: GORDIN and KATLER, Canada #latvia

Joseph J Zasloff <zasloff+@...>
 

Moderator Note: I am sorry but this message was received
after the original one was approved. Would readers please
note that Tela Zasloff wishes this to be his message.


Please note that I have made some additions to my previous message.
Please use the one below instead of the previous one.

Thank you. Tela Zasloff
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: GORDIN and KATLER, Canada

I am searching for a Canadian (probably Montreal) branch of my
grandmother's family.

My grandmother, Sylvia/Tsiveh GORDIN, was born in Rhesitsa/Rezekne, now in
Latvia, in 1890. Her father, Aaron Shlomo GORDIN, had a brother (I don't
know his first name), whose son emigrated to Canada. That son had a
daughter, Anne GORDIN KATLER (married to Ben KATLER), and two sons, Bill
and Dave GORDIN. Anne GORDIN KATLER corresponded, in the 1950's and
60's, with my grandmother (who was living in California at the time) and
sent photos. The names on the photos show Anne GORDIN KATLER's parents,
husband Ben and sons Julian and Michael KATLER, and granddaughter Linda
Sue KATLER.

Also, that her brother Bill GORDIN had two daughters and her brother Dave
GORDIN had a son, Richard GORDIN. Lastly, a nephew Marvin--no family name
given.

Can anyone make connections for me?

Thank you.

Tela Zasloff
email: zasloff+@pitt.edu