Date   

Vilna District Research Group materials in the Resource Room - SLC #general

Joelrat@...
 

A book containing the following materials will be available in the
Resource Room at the Conference next week:

Vilna District Research Group Materials

Section 1 - Sample record >from the 1858 Revision List for Moletai
2 pages in Russian

Section 2 - Translated records >from the 1858 Revision List for Vilna
[approximately 10% of the total records for the Jewish community]

Section 3 - Map of Vilna gubernia [Russian]; Street map of Vilna [early
20th Cent. - Hebrew]; Information on the Slavonic library [U. of Helsinki]

Section 4 - Article on Vilna >from the Jewish Encyclopedia

Section 5 - Statistical analysis of the 1897 All Russia Census - Vilna
gubernia - French

Section 6 - Article on Vilna >from Evreiskaia Entsiklopediia - St.
Petersburg 1906-13 - Russian

Section 7 - Article on Vilna Gubernia >from Evreiskaia Entsiklopediia - St.
Petersburg 1906-13 - Russian

Section 8 - "Report on the Condition of the Trade School at the Vilna
Talmud Tory, 1894" - published Vilna, 1895 - Russian

This work contains a list of donors to the Vilna Talmud Torah - I was able
to find a relative in this list.

Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


Vilna District Research Group needs HTML capability #general

Joelrat@...
 

The Vilna District Research Group is looking for someone to put together
a Web page for Vilna in addition to the existing Shtetlinks page. If
anyone is interested in volunteering some time to put together, maintain
this page and possibly maintain the Shtetlinks page, please contact me at
Joelrat@aol.com.

Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Vilna District Research Group materials in the Resource Room - SLC #general

Joelrat@...
 

A book containing the following materials will be available in the
Resource Room at the Conference next week:

Vilna District Research Group Materials

Section 1 - Sample record >from the 1858 Revision List for Moletai
2 pages in Russian

Section 2 - Translated records >from the 1858 Revision List for Vilna
[approximately 10% of the total records for the Jewish community]

Section 3 - Map of Vilna gubernia [Russian]; Street map of Vilna [early
20th Cent. - Hebrew]; Information on the Slavonic library [U. of Helsinki]

Section 4 - Article on Vilna >from the Jewish Encyclopedia

Section 5 - Statistical analysis of the 1897 All Russia Census - Vilna
gubernia - French

Section 6 - Article on Vilna >from Evreiskaia Entsiklopediia - St.
Petersburg 1906-13 - Russian

Section 7 - Article on Vilna Gubernia >from Evreiskaia Entsiklopediia - St.
Petersburg 1906-13 - Russian

Section 8 - "Report on the Condition of the Trade School at the Vilna
Talmud Tory, 1894" - published Vilna, 1895 - Russian

This work contains a list of donors to the Vilna Talmud Torah - I was able
to find a relative in this list.

Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Vilna District Research Group needs HTML capability #general

Joelrat@...
 

The Vilna District Research Group is looking for someone to put together
a Web page for Vilna in addition to the existing Shtetlinks page. If
anyone is interested in volunteering some time to put together, maintain
this page and possibly maintain the Shtetlinks page, please contact me at
Joelrat@aol.com.

Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


NY Census Finding Aids #general

Jackye Sullins <jackye@...>
 

Can anyone tell me if there are finding aids for Brooklyn in the 1905,
1915, and 1925 state censuses? I know they exist for Manhattan and the
Bronx.

Thanks.

Jackye Sullins


Re: Sunshine, the Movie #general

Paul Silverstone
 

I second this suggestion. Saw the film on Saturday and it is very
absorbing. Although long, it does not drag. There are many very
illuminating moments in this saga which lasts through the 20th century.
Paul Silvestone

Steve Axelrath wrote:

If it's allowed in this forum, I'd like to urge all those interested
in the lives of their Jewish ancestors in Europe (amid the turmoils of
modern European history) to see the film Sunshine. My wife and I just
returned >from seeing it. The film brings to life 5 (I think)
generations of Jewish life in Hungary. It's probably playing at your
local art cinema. I, of course, have no commercial connection with the
film. I wish I could spend hours talking with the people who produced
it, though.
Ellen and I will be thinking of this film years >from now. If you
resonate to the lives of your ancestors, do see it.


Re: photographing gravestones #hungary

Stephen B. Nathan <Steve@...>
 

For whatever it's worth, I was photographing a stone as a favor to
someone and was told by a cemetery official that I was to be sure not
to include any other stones. Whole thing sounds like nonsense to me.

Steve

Dick@Plotz.Com wrote:

Our friend remarked to us that in New Orleans gravestone inscriptions
are considered to be the private property of the family and may
not be photographed without permission
If anyone has had any experience with such restrictions, I
would be interested to know about it. I have no idea how
reliable our friend's information is.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NY Census Finding Aids #general

Jackye Sullins <jackye@...>
 

Can anyone tell me if there are finding aids for Brooklyn in the 1905,
1915, and 1925 state censuses? I know they exist for Manhattan and the
Bronx.

Thanks.

Jackye Sullins


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Sunshine, the Movie #general

Paul Silverstone
 

I second this suggestion. Saw the film on Saturday and it is very
absorbing. Although long, it does not drag. There are many very
illuminating moments in this saga which lasts through the 20th century.
Paul Silvestone

Steve Axelrath wrote:

If it's allowed in this forum, I'd like to urge all those interested
in the lives of their Jewish ancestors in Europe (amid the turmoils of
modern European history) to see the film Sunshine. My wife and I just
returned >from seeing it. The film brings to life 5 (I think)
generations of Jewish life in Hungary. It's probably playing at your
local art cinema. I, of course, have no commercial connection with the
film. I wish I could spend hours talking with the people who produced
it, though.
Ellen and I will be thinking of this film years >from now. If you
resonate to the lives of your ancestors, do see it.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: photographing gravestones #general

Stephen B. Nathan <Steve@...>
 

For whatever it's worth, I was photographing a stone as a favor to
someone and was told by a cemetery official that I was to be sure not
to include any other stones. Whole thing sounds like nonsense to me.

Steve

Dick@Plotz.Com wrote:

Our friend remarked to us that in New Orleans gravestone inscriptions
are considered to be the private property of the family and may
not be photographed without permission
If anyone has had any experience with such restrictions, I
would be interested to know about it. I have no idea how
reliable our friend's information is.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI USA


James and Elsie HERZ - New York City #general

Genealicej@...
 

I have a little more information on my HERZ family including
the names James and Elsie HERZ.

I am looking for members of the HERZ family originally >from
Kochendorf, now Bad Friedrichsall, Baden Wuerttemberg, who
emigrated to New York City.

Names: STERN/STARR family of Heppenheim an der Bergstrasse,
Hesse (settled in Louisville, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio, USA) and
the HERZ family >from Kochendorf, now Bad Friedrichshall, Baden
Wuerttemberg, Germany (settled in New York City). JENSEN of New
York City, USA. Also looking for LEVI family (France>Louisville,
Kentucky>Portsmouth, Ohio), ATLAS and DAVIS family
(Portsmouth, Ohio), SCHWARZSCHILD family (Hochheim am Main,
Hesse, Germany), HOCHSCHILD family (Gross-Rohrheim, Hesse,
Germany), MAIER-, MAYER-, MEIER or MEYERFELD family of Biebesheim,
Gross Gerau, Hesse, GRUMBACH (Germany>New York City, USA),
DEUTSCH (Germany>New York City, USA), OPPENHEIMER (Stuttgart>New
York City, USA), KAUFMANN New York City, DON and JOSEPHS family >from
London, England, MARKUS >from Hainchen, Kreis Buedingen, Hesse and
GRUEN (GREEN) family >from Roedelheim, Frankfurt am Main, Hesse.

http://members.tripod.co.uk/AliceJosephs/INDEX.HTM

Are we by chance connected?

Alice Josephs
United Kingdom

HERZ family name mailing list
Shortcut URL to this page:
http://www.egroups.com/group/Herz
Post message: Herz@egroups.com
Subscribe: Herz-subscribe@egroups.com


Thanks for helping me find a missing HERZ and the beginnings of a new Westchester JGS. #general

Genealicej@...
 

Many, many thanks to Joe FIBEL and Alan STEINFELD for tracing a missing
HERZ relative in double quick time. Another amazed relative asked me how,
in her words, I managed to find the elusive cousin "sooooo fast" >from the
slight information I had that the family lived in Scarsdale, NYC. I had to
tell her Interpol has nothing on Jewishgen!

I believe there are also thoughts of starting a Westchester Jewish
Genealogy Society at the same time.

http://members.tripod.co.uk/AliceJosephs/INDEX.HTM

Alice Josephs
United Kingdom

HERZ family name mailing list
Shortcut URL to this page:
http://www.egroups.com/group/Herz
Post message: Herz@egroups.com
Subscribe: Herz-subscribe@egroups.com


Photographing Gravestones #general

JOHN & DEE DEE ROSS <jnddross@...>
 

Hello Genners,
In regard to Dick's query about photographing gravestones;
A few years ago, my cousin was visiting >from Germany. We were at
"our" cemetery taking pictures of the stones in our family plot. A
grounds-keeper approached us and told us it was not permissable to take
pictures in the cemetery. That is a bunch of nonsense. Turns out it
was a "superstition" that his ethnic culture has regarding taking
pictures of graves. I ignored him. This was *my* family, *we* had paid
for the stones, and he had no business telling me that I could not
photograph them. Dee Dee Ross


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen James and Elsie HERZ - New York City #general

Genealicej@...
 

I have a little more information on my HERZ family including
the names James and Elsie HERZ.

I am looking for members of the HERZ family originally >from
Kochendorf, now Bad Friedrichsall, Baden Wuerttemberg, who
emigrated to New York City.

Names: STERN/STARR family of Heppenheim an der Bergstrasse,
Hesse (settled in Louisville, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio, USA) and
the HERZ family >from Kochendorf, now Bad Friedrichshall, Baden
Wuerttemberg, Germany (settled in New York City). JENSEN of New
York City, USA. Also looking for LEVI family (France>Louisville,
Kentucky>Portsmouth, Ohio), ATLAS and DAVIS family
(Portsmouth, Ohio), SCHWARZSCHILD family (Hochheim am Main,
Hesse, Germany), HOCHSCHILD family (Gross-Rohrheim, Hesse,
Germany), MAIER-, MAYER-, MEIER or MEYERFELD family of Biebesheim,
Gross Gerau, Hesse, GRUMBACH (Germany>New York City, USA),
DEUTSCH (Germany>New York City, USA), OPPENHEIMER (Stuttgart>New
York City, USA), KAUFMANN New York City, DON and JOSEPHS family >from
London, England, MARKUS >from Hainchen, Kreis Buedingen, Hesse and
GRUEN (GREEN) family >from Roedelheim, Frankfurt am Main, Hesse.

http://members.tripod.co.uk/AliceJosephs/INDEX.HTM

Are we by chance connected?

Alice Josephs
United Kingdom

HERZ family name mailing list
Shortcut URL to this page:
http://www.egroups.com/group/Herz
Post message: Herz@egroups.com
Subscribe: Herz-subscribe@egroups.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thanks for helping me find a missing HERZ and the beginnings of a new Westchester JGS. #general

Genealicej@...
 

Many, many thanks to Joe FIBEL and Alan STEINFELD for tracing a missing
HERZ relative in double quick time. Another amazed relative asked me how,
in her words, I managed to find the elusive cousin "sooooo fast" >from the
slight information I had that the family lived in Scarsdale, NYC. I had to
tell her Interpol has nothing on Jewishgen!

I believe there are also thoughts of starting a Westchester Jewish
Genealogy Society at the same time.

http://members.tripod.co.uk/AliceJosephs/INDEX.HTM

Alice Josephs
United Kingdom

HERZ family name mailing list
Shortcut URL to this page:
http://www.egroups.com/group/Herz
Post message: Herz@egroups.com
Subscribe: Herz-subscribe@egroups.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Photographing Gravestones #general

JOHN & DEE DEE ROSS <jnddross@...>
 

Hello Genners,
In regard to Dick's query about photographing gravestones;
A few years ago, my cousin was visiting >from Germany. We were at
"our" cemetery taking pictures of the stones in our family plot. A
grounds-keeper approached us and told us it was not permissable to take
pictures in the cemetery. That is a bunch of nonsense. Turns out it
was a "superstition" that his ethnic culture has regarding taking
pictures of graves. I ignored him. This was *my* family, *we* had paid
for the stones, and he had no business telling me that I could not
photograph them. Dee Dee Ross


Re: Is she Jewish? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

of course she is Jewish.

Debra Rosenberg
Westfield, nj

Adele wrote:

If a girl's maternal grandmother is Jewish, married to a Christian, her
mother raised without religion, but certainly not as a Jew, can the girl
(grandaughter) be Jewish? The girl is engaged to a Jewish boy.
Of course Debra is correct, as the girl in question is biologically
descended in the female line. However, the fact that this question was
even raised underscores the extent to which -- especially in America with
its tradition of separation of church and state -- people have come to
think of "Jewish" as primarily a matter of religious faith and/or practice,
rather than an ethnicity. One cannot emphasize too often (and I've
repeated it ad nauseam on this list) that Jewishness has since always been
determined by biological descent (including biological descent >from a
convert). But even before the so-called "matrilineal principle" came in
(at some undetermined time after 200 CE/AD) it was already a matter of
biological descent -- except that in ancient Israelite and late biblical
(= early Jewish) times it had been determined patrilineally, as any
number of biblical stories attest.

But in any case, once we take the logical step of thinking historically
rather than in terms of contemporary realities, it is easy to see that in
ancient times religion was an appendage of ethnicity. You were born a Jew
(Judaeus means "Judaean") and you observed the religion called Judaism
secondarily or maybe not at all -- but you always remained a Jew unless you
actively converted to another religion. People automatically followed
the religion of the group they were born into -- as indeed most people in
the world still do today. It wasn't until the advent of Christianity and,
later, Islam, that religions began to be viewed as dependent on faith and
conviction rather than circumstances of birth. But Judaism, because it
predates that time, has always taken for granted that a biological Jew
(including a halakhically converted one who has become metaphorically a
"son/daughter of Abraham and Sarah") , is a Jew, irrespective of his or her
level of Jewish practice -- and even more regardless of that person's inner
thoughts or beliefs. "Yisra'el af 'al pi she-Hata, Yisra'el hu" said our
sages of blessed memory -- "a Jew, even one who has contravened the rules,
remains a Jew. " (How ironic that Hitler and the Nazis were more familiar
with this rule -- and probably also with the original patrilineal
principle, since their criteria encompassed a single grandparent of either
sex -- than were most Jews themselves!)

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: Bar Mitzvah Custom: Throwing sweets, nuts and raisins #general

Moshe & Joyce Dreyfuss <mjdreyfuss@...>
 

Linda Morzillo of Saratoga Springs, wrote:

At some point the women and girls, sitting upstairs, threw small >wrapped
packages of sweets, nuts and raisins at the young man
whose Bar Mitzvah it was.
Is this a custom >from certain parts of Eastern Europe? My paternal
grandparents were Litvaks >from what is now western Belarus. Has anyone
heard of this? Is it still done today?
The origins of this tradition go back very far and I'm sure someone with
greater knowledge can give a better answer.

As far the custom today in Baltimore, MD, where I live, there are more
than 20 orthodox shuls including Ashkenazi, Sephardic, Lubovitch, Satmar,
German, Iranian, Russian, etc., and they all throw candy, nuts, etc. at
bar mitzvahs and uff ruufs (forgive the spelling)*. It has become such an
American tradition that you can buy prepackaged candy, nuts, and popcorn
in celophane wrappers with "Mazol Tov" printed on the wrapper.
The great thing about throwing the candy is that the younger children grab
the packages as they land around the beama so there is no mess left after
the bar mitzvah or chossen is "honored" with this shower.

Some traditions may originate elsewhere, but when it becomes popular,
everyone adopts it.

I await other more difinitive answers.

*(One shul does not permit it since the popcorn opened >from the package
when thrown >from the balcony and the "officers" did not like the messy
shower and required clean up so they put a stop to the pratice.)

Moshe Dreyfuss
Baltimore, MD
mjdreyfuss@hotmail.com

searching for Dreyfuss, Brenner, Greenbaum, Aaron, Schulman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Is she Jewish? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

of course she is Jewish.

Debra Rosenberg
Westfield, nj

Adele wrote:

If a girl's maternal grandmother is Jewish, married to a Christian, her
mother raised without religion, but certainly not as a Jew, can the girl
(grandaughter) be Jewish? The girl is engaged to a Jewish boy.
Of course Debra is correct, as the girl in question is biologically
descended in the female line. However, the fact that this question was
even raised underscores the extent to which -- especially in America with
its tradition of separation of church and state -- people have come to
think of "Jewish" as primarily a matter of religious faith and/or practice,
rather than an ethnicity. One cannot emphasize too often (and I've
repeated it ad nauseam on this list) that Jewishness has since always been
determined by biological descent (including biological descent >from a
convert). But even before the so-called "matrilineal principle" came in
(at some undetermined time after 200 CE/AD) it was already a matter of
biological descent -- except that in ancient Israelite and late biblical
(= early Jewish) times it had been determined patrilineally, as any
number of biblical stories attest.

But in any case, once we take the logical step of thinking historically
rather than in terms of contemporary realities, it is easy to see that in
ancient times religion was an appendage of ethnicity. You were born a Jew
(Judaeus means "Judaean") and you observed the religion called Judaism
secondarily or maybe not at all -- but you always remained a Jew unless you
actively converted to another religion. People automatically followed
the religion of the group they were born into -- as indeed most people in
the world still do today. It wasn't until the advent of Christianity and,
later, Islam, that religions began to be viewed as dependent on faith and
conviction rather than circumstances of birth. But Judaism, because it
predates that time, has always taken for granted that a biological Jew
(including a halakhically converted one who has become metaphorically a
"son/daughter of Abraham and Sarah") , is a Jew, irrespective of his or her
level of Jewish practice -- and even more regardless of that person's inner
thoughts or beliefs. "Yisra'el af 'al pi she-Hata, Yisra'el hu" said our
sages of blessed memory -- "a Jew, even one who has contravened the rules,
remains a Jew. " (How ironic that Hitler and the Nazis were more familiar
with this rule -- and probably also with the original patrilineal
principle, since their criteria encompassed a single grandparent of either
sex -- than were most Jews themselves!)

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Bar Mitzvah Custom: Throwing sweets, nuts and raisins #general

Moshe & Joyce Dreyfuss <mjdreyfuss@...>
 

Linda Morzillo of Saratoga Springs, wrote:

At some point the women and girls, sitting upstairs, threw small >wrapped
packages of sweets, nuts and raisins at the young man
whose Bar Mitzvah it was.
Is this a custom >from certain parts of Eastern Europe? My paternal
grandparents were Litvaks >from what is now western Belarus. Has anyone
heard of this? Is it still done today?
The origins of this tradition go back very far and I'm sure someone with
greater knowledge can give a better answer.

As far the custom today in Baltimore, MD, where I live, there are more
than 20 orthodox shuls including Ashkenazi, Sephardic, Lubovitch, Satmar,
German, Iranian, Russian, etc., and they all throw candy, nuts, etc. at
bar mitzvahs and uff ruufs (forgive the spelling)*. It has become such an
American tradition that you can buy prepackaged candy, nuts, and popcorn
in celophane wrappers with "Mazol Tov" printed on the wrapper.
The great thing about throwing the candy is that the younger children grab
the packages as they land around the beama so there is no mess left after
the bar mitzvah or chossen is "honored" with this shower.

Some traditions may originate elsewhere, but when it becomes popular,
everyone adopts it.

I await other more difinitive answers.

*(One shul does not permit it since the popcorn opened >from the package
when thrown >from the balcony and the "officers" did not like the messy
shower and required clean up so they put a stop to the pratice.)

Moshe Dreyfuss
Baltimore, MD
mjdreyfuss@hotmail.com

searching for Dreyfuss, Brenner, Greenbaum, Aaron, Schulman