Date   

searching NEMEROWSKI , POKRASS or POKRASSA, and LEVITT #general

Rochelle Nameroff
 

I am trying to find out something about my roots. My father was Philip
NAMEROFF, son of Jacob NEMEROWSKI >from (my mothers says) Vinograd in
the Ukraine. I know there are three shtetls named Nemirov so that's a
possibility, too. Jacob Nemerovsky was a rabbi and/or a cantor. He
came to America probably before WWI and settled in Milwaukee, and
brought his children (3 boys, 3 girls) over one by one. My father came
over after WWI and I gather went >from Russia to England to Cuba to
Mexico City, where he lived for a while, then to Milwaukee. I know very
little about his family.

My mother's maiden name was Esther POKRASS. Her parents came to
America, father first, then mother, >from Rossava, also near Kiev in the
Ukraine. They would have arrived in 1911 and 1912, and went to
Milwaukee, where my mother was born. There's family of hers in New York
as well. Her grandfather, she says, was the town banker (??) and owned
a factory for making sugar sacks in Rossava. My grandmother's father
had a mill for grain. My grandma (maiden name LEVITT) was sent to Kiev
to apprentice as a dressmaker.
There's also some family legend about my mother's parents, who were
sweethearts in Rossava, belonging to some underground socialist group,
and having to bury some papers or a printing press to avoid the
authorities. Supposedly my grandpa, who was big and brawny, buried the
stuff but later truly couldn't remember where he buried it.

As a young girl my mother tried to research the Pokrass name, and said
it had been changed >from POKRASSA, which she thinks was originally from
Greece.

Any Nemerovskys or Nameroffs or Pokrasses or Pokrassas out there?
I live in the Bay Area.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen searching NEMEROWSKI , POKRASS or POKRASSA, and LEVITT #general

Rochelle Nameroff
 

I am trying to find out something about my roots. My father was Philip
NAMEROFF, son of Jacob NEMEROWSKI >from (my mothers says) Vinograd in
the Ukraine. I know there are three shtetls named Nemirov so that's a
possibility, too. Jacob Nemerovsky was a rabbi and/or a cantor. He
came to America probably before WWI and settled in Milwaukee, and
brought his children (3 boys, 3 girls) over one by one. My father came
over after WWI and I gather went >from Russia to England to Cuba to
Mexico City, where he lived for a while, then to Milwaukee. I know very
little about his family.

My mother's maiden name was Esther POKRASS. Her parents came to
America, father first, then mother, >from Rossava, also near Kiev in the
Ukraine. They would have arrived in 1911 and 1912, and went to
Milwaukee, where my mother was born. There's family of hers in New York
as well. Her grandfather, she says, was the town banker (??) and owned
a factory for making sugar sacks in Rossava. My grandmother's father
had a mill for grain. My grandma (maiden name LEVITT) was sent to Kiev
to apprentice as a dressmaker.
There's also some family legend about my mother's parents, who were
sweethearts in Rossava, belonging to some underground socialist group,
and having to bury some papers or a printing press to avoid the
authorities. Supposedly my grandpa, who was big and brawny, buried the
stuff but later truly couldn't remember where he buried it.

As a young girl my mother tried to research the Pokrass name, and said
it had been changed >from POKRASSA, which she thinks was originally from
Greece.

Any Nemerovskys or Nameroffs or Pokrasses or Pokrassas out there?
I live in the Bay Area.


Re: Hebrew Volin Cemetery, W. Roxbury MA - origin of name? #general

Albert Gershman <gershie@...>
 

Try contacting the Jewish Cemetery Association of Massachusetts at
www.jcam.org

MarlaJAP@aol.com wrote:


Does anyone out here in Jewishgen know the origin of the name of this
cemetery? Most of my family is buried there, and it is not the only
Jewish cemetery in the area. I'm curious as to whether this particular
cemetery was originally planned to be limited to those >from Volynia...
if that is the case, the answer to my family origins question has been
right under my nose all along (Volin, Wolena on the census,
Volynia...hmmmmm....).

Also, if there is anyone out there who is familiar with this cemetery,
please contact me privately. I am curious as to whether they are
cooperative with genealogists.

Regards,

Marla Goldman
Mesa AZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Hebrew Volin Cemetery, W. Roxbury MA - origin of name? #general

Albert Gershman <gershie@...>
 

Try contacting the Jewish Cemetery Association of Massachusetts at
www.jcam.org

MarlaJAP@aol.com wrote:


Does anyone out here in Jewishgen know the origin of the name of this
cemetery? Most of my family is buried there, and it is not the only
Jewish cemetery in the area. I'm curious as to whether this particular
cemetery was originally planned to be limited to those >from Volynia...
if that is the case, the answer to my family origins question has been
right under my nose all along (Volin, Wolena on the census,
Volynia...hmmmmm....).

Also, if there is anyone out there who is familiar with this cemetery,
please contact me privately. I am curious as to whether they are
cooperative with genealogists.

Regards,

Marla Goldman
Mesa AZ


Re: AZANON #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

A long shot, but the name could derive >from AZANORIA, the Spanish
word for, guess what?... CARROT :-) It's a variant of the word
ZANAHORIA, which means the same thing.

Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil

Does anyone know if the Spanish surname AZANON which I hardly find would
come >from Hasan or Hazan?
Violette Novo Germanaud malaviel@club-internet.fr


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: AZANON #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

A long shot, but the name could derive >from AZANORIA, the Spanish
word for, guess what?... CARROT :-) It's a variant of the word
ZANAHORIA, which means the same thing.

Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil

Does anyone know if the Spanish surname AZANON which I hardly find would
come >from Hasan or Hazan?
Violette Novo Germanaud malaviel@club-internet.fr


Holocaust Martyr List #hungary

Stephen SCHMIDEG <stephen@...>
 

Those of you who haven't looked at the Gyor Holocaust Martyr List
http://netfind.simplenet.com/gyor/newpage14.htm might like to note that we have added more
information. The database now contains (where available) date and place of birth,
mother's name, spouse and maiden name for females. We have also corrected the problem we
had with displaying Hungarian characters.

The inclusion of place of birth, maiden names and mother's name broadens the genealogical
usefulness of this list of over 3,000 names, as it now gives information on people who
lived in parts of Hungary other than Gyor.

Our next project will be transfer this list into an interactive database to make it easier
to do searches by name and town.

Stephen Schmideg
Melbourne Australia


Stephen A.Escott re:Baneth #hungary

Gary Binetter <gbin@...>
 

I have tried sending a message via The Family Tree of the Jewish People to a
researcher regarding his Baneth entry. Apparently his email has changed.
It was an email address in Israel.
If by some slim chance anybody knows Stephen A.Escott, or finds his name in
the phone book, please let me know.
Thank you in advance.
Gary Binetter gbin@ozemail.com.au


Hungary SIG #Hungary Holocaust Martyr List #hungary

Stephen SCHMIDEG <stephen@...>
 

Those of you who haven't looked at the Gyor Holocaust Martyr List
http://netfind.simplenet.com/gyor/newpage14.htm might like to note that we have added more
information. The database now contains (where available) date and place of birth,
mother's name, spouse and maiden name for females. We have also corrected the problem we
had with displaying Hungarian characters.

The inclusion of place of birth, maiden names and mother's name broadens the genealogical
usefulness of this list of over 3,000 names, as it now gives information on people who
lived in parts of Hungary other than Gyor.

Our next project will be transfer this list into an interactive database to make it easier
to do searches by name and town.

Stephen Schmideg
Melbourne Australia


Hungary SIG #Hungary Stephen A.Escott re:Baneth #hungary

Gary Binetter <gbin@...>
 

I have tried sending a message via The Family Tree of the Jewish People to a
researcher regarding his Baneth entry. Apparently his email has changed.
It was an email address in Israel.
If by some slim chance anybody knows Stephen A.Escott, or finds his name in
the phone book, please let me know.
Thank you in advance.
Gary Binetter gbin@ozemail.com.au


How many of us wonder how lucky we are? #general

Rica Goldberg
 

Almost every single day I remind myself how much luckier I am than my
ancestors.

For example, my maternal grandfather came to England when he was a boy of
15 (I believe) to escape going into the army in Russia (Lithuania).
Similarly, so did two of his brothers. I constantly remind myself that
their mother never saw them again, never saw their children (her
grandchildren), never heard their voices (I am sure they did not have "cheap"
phone calls (!!!) - they did not even have a telephone in the 1890's, did
they?). The only contact they would have had for the rest of their parents
existence would have been by letter and I am sure that they would have been
'thin on the ground'.

Compare this to me. We have a daughter, son-in-law, and five grandchildren
who have lived in Jerusalem for more than 10 years. We miss them so much
but we visit them and they visit us. Now that we both have "cheap" phone
calls abroad, we speak almost daily. We speak before Shabbat, after Shabbat
and during the week. This morning I telephoned and it was answered by my
17 year old grandson. I had a conversation with him but his mother was
not at home. Ring her on the "pele" (mobile) phone he said. I telephoned
her on her mobile, she was with a friend out shopping and I spoke to her.
Later I rang the house and spoke with my 15 year old grand-daughter. I
asked her about her activities; what she wanted to eat when she visits us
in three weeks time, and where she wanted to go. When I put down the phone
I again reminded myself how much more fortunate I was than my great
grandmother who would never have seen her sons again or met their off-springs.
And we have more contact still. We have e-mail, and some of us might even
be lucky to be set up with cameras connected to our computers.

I never loose sight of how much luckier I am than my great grandparents.

Rica B Goldberg
Manchester, England

Still researching the following:

1)KAMINSKY (KAMENSHCHIK ?) >from Yanova ( Jonava) nr Kovno,Lithuania

2)DIAMOND (DIMONT or DIAMONT) >from Kovno, Lithuania; 3) Newman, Emannuel,
Rachel & Esther LEVY and their parents Chana & Yehuda LEV from
KROSNIEWICE in Poland; 4) Isaac & Rebecca COHEN - Poland; 5)Chaim and
Rebecca ESTRY - a glazier >from Poland; 6)GOLDBERG ( SCHELENGER ? or in
Yiddish SCHLUZITSIL) >from Kovno, Lithuania; 7) BERLINSKY >from ????;


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How many of us wonder how lucky we are? #general

Rica Goldberg
 

Almost every single day I remind myself how much luckier I am than my
ancestors.

For example, my maternal grandfather came to England when he was a boy of
15 (I believe) to escape going into the army in Russia (Lithuania).
Similarly, so did two of his brothers. I constantly remind myself that
their mother never saw them again, never saw their children (her
grandchildren), never heard their voices (I am sure they did not have "cheap"
phone calls (!!!) - they did not even have a telephone in the 1890's, did
they?). The only contact they would have had for the rest of their parents
existence would have been by letter and I am sure that they would have been
'thin on the ground'.

Compare this to me. We have a daughter, son-in-law, and five grandchildren
who have lived in Jerusalem for more than 10 years. We miss them so much
but we visit them and they visit us. Now that we both have "cheap" phone
calls abroad, we speak almost daily. We speak before Shabbat, after Shabbat
and during the week. This morning I telephoned and it was answered by my
17 year old grandson. I had a conversation with him but his mother was
not at home. Ring her on the "pele" (mobile) phone he said. I telephoned
her on her mobile, she was with a friend out shopping and I spoke to her.
Later I rang the house and spoke with my 15 year old grand-daughter. I
asked her about her activities; what she wanted to eat when she visits us
in three weeks time, and where she wanted to go. When I put down the phone
I again reminded myself how much more fortunate I was than my great
grandmother who would never have seen her sons again or met their off-springs.
And we have more contact still. We have e-mail, and some of us might even
be lucky to be set up with cameras connected to our computers.

I never loose sight of how much luckier I am than my great grandparents.

Rica B Goldberg
Manchester, England

Still researching the following:

1)KAMINSKY (KAMENSHCHIK ?) >from Yanova ( Jonava) nr Kovno,Lithuania

2)DIAMOND (DIMONT or DIAMONT) >from Kovno, Lithuania; 3) Newman, Emannuel,
Rachel & Esther LEVY and their parents Chana & Yehuda LEV from
KROSNIEWICE in Poland; 4) Isaac & Rebecca COHEN - Poland; 5)Chaim and
Rebecca ESTRY - a glazier >from Poland; 6)GOLDBERG ( SCHELENGER ? or in
Yiddish SCHLUZITSIL) >from Kovno, Lithuania; 7) BERLINSKY >from ????;


book title : "Schone Zeiten" by Ernst Klee #general

Norman Greenfeld
 

It is eye opening to read "Schone Zeiten" by Ernst Klee [English
title: "The Good Old Days" -- Mod.]. It is replete with stories,
anecdotes and memorabilia of the Nazi guards and officers of the
deathcamps and the "fun" they had carrying out their "divine mission".
A copy of this should surely be in the US Holocaust Museum in DC.
Norm Greenfeld
Albany NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen book title : "Schone Zeiten" by Ernst Klee #general

Norman Greenfeld
 

It is eye opening to read "Schone Zeiten" by Ernst Klee [English
title: "The Good Old Days" -- Mod.]. It is replete with stories,
anecdotes and memorabilia of the Nazi guards and officers of the
deathcamps and the "fun" they had carrying out their "divine mission".
A copy of this should surely be in the US Holocaust Museum in DC.
Norm Greenfeld
Albany NY


Re: Chief Rabbi of London and/or England #general

Roberta Sheps <roberta_l_sheps@...>
 

Dear Eric,

The Jewish Yearbook published in England lists all of the Chief Rabbis
of Britain (more accurately, the Chief Rabbis of the United Hebrew
Congregations of the [British] Commonwealth, which did not, in Great
Britain in the 19th century include Reform or Ultra Orthodox
synagogues]. There were only 3 chief rabbis in the 19th century:
Solomon Herschell (1802-1842), Nathan Marcus Adler (1845-1890) and
Hermann Adler (1891-1911). Unless Simon Stock had changed his name it
does not seem likely that he was a son of one of these men.

I don't know how helpful the office would be, but you could try writing
to the Office of the Chief Rabbi at Adler House, 735 High Road, London
N12 0US and asking if they have more detailed biographical information
that would either confirm or refute this family rumour.

The other branches of Judaism have their own organisation and
hierarchies, but their religious leaders are not referred to as Chief
Rabbis.

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England

EEllman@aol.com wrote:


My great grand aunt, Regina (Greenberg) Stock (c. 1866-1948), married
Simon Stock. Simon was rumored to be the son of the Chief Rabbi of London
and/or England. Any way I can find out more information about this
rumor? According to family legend, Simon rebelled against the strictures
of orthodoxy and left England for the US. I do not know Simon's age, but
his wife, Regina was born c. 1866 and I presume Simon immigrated before
1913, the year of birth of their first child.

Eric J. Ellman
N. Bethesda, MD


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Chief Rabbi of London and/or England #general

Roberta Sheps <roberta_l_sheps@...>
 

Dear Eric,

The Jewish Yearbook published in England lists all of the Chief Rabbis
of Britain (more accurately, the Chief Rabbis of the United Hebrew
Congregations of the [British] Commonwealth, which did not, in Great
Britain in the 19th century include Reform or Ultra Orthodox
synagogues]. There were only 3 chief rabbis in the 19th century:
Solomon Herschell (1802-1842), Nathan Marcus Adler (1845-1890) and
Hermann Adler (1891-1911). Unless Simon Stock had changed his name it
does not seem likely that he was a son of one of these men.

I don't know how helpful the office would be, but you could try writing
to the Office of the Chief Rabbi at Adler House, 735 High Road, London
N12 0US and asking if they have more detailed biographical information
that would either confirm or refute this family rumour.

The other branches of Judaism have their own organisation and
hierarchies, but their religious leaders are not referred to as Chief
Rabbis.

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England

EEllman@aol.com wrote:


My great grand aunt, Regina (Greenberg) Stock (c. 1866-1948), married
Simon Stock. Simon was rumored to be the son of the Chief Rabbi of London
and/or England. Any way I can find out more information about this
rumor? According to family legend, Simon rebelled against the strictures
of orthodoxy and left England for the US. I do not know Simon's age, but
his wife, Regina was born c. 1866 and I presume Simon immigrated before
1913, the year of birth of their first child.

Eric J. Ellman
N. Bethesda, MD


Genealogy Software #general

steven.chall@...
 

We frequently see a request such as, "I am looking to purchase a software
program to keep track of my family tree. What is the best program I
should buy? pros and cons"

Since JewishGen cannot endorse any product(s), I usually respond
directly to the writer. However, I thought that a "generic" response
would be acceptable with JewishGen policy and perhaps preclude the
repeated request. The following is an excerpt of the response I
typically send out.

Your choice of which software program to use will be determined by how
"serious" a researcher you are, your comfort with the way each program
works and your pocketbook. Most are affordable and several are shareware
which allows you to test them before you spend any money.

Many people outgrow the intro programs within a year or two and then
have to transfer their data to another program. It is worth the
investment of time to try several before you put in too much time
entering your data into a program that you'll be unsatisfied with.

There is no *best* program!! Readers of the JewishGen Discussion Group
are using a wide variety of programs. The choice of what to purchase
depends upon what *you* want to do. Some people merely want to know the
family relationships so they can draw the familiar "tree". Everyone
includes at least basic BMD (Birth/Marriage/Death) data. Others want to
include locations for these events. Still others want to record many
other events in each individual's life. This may include photographs or
even sound recordings.

Some want to be "more professional" and record where they obtained each
piece of information and how reliable (surety) they consider it to be.
Then comes the question of what you plan to *do* with this data. Do you
want to write a family history book? Some programs automatically create
basic sentences >from the data you provide. These can be exported to a
word processor and polished for publication.

For the PC, many of the better programs can be examined for free to
assist you in making your decision. Shareware programs, like Brother's
Keeper and Cumberland Family Tree, allow total testing. Mid-range
programs, like Family Origins and Family Tree Maker, also have demos that
allow you to work with up to about 20-25 people in a family. Top of the
line programs, like Generations (the PC version of Reunion) and The
Master Genealogist offer many more bells and whistles that you may or may
not like/want.

I cannot comment on Ilanot, the only Hebrew oriented package, because
they would not provide any sort of trial or demo of their software for
review. At this time, it is the only one capable of easily printing in
Hebrew (assuming you have the fonts available).

Finally, do _not_ be swayed by the added CDs of data that accompany some
of the programs. Most are worthless for Jewish genealogists and others
have equivalent (and more up-to-date) information available on-line.

I hope this will get you started in your decision. My strongest advice
is to "try it before you buy it" one way or other. The features may not
be as important as the ease of working with the different screens for
entering and recalling your data. This is often a personal preference.
If you have other specific questions, don't hesitate to drop me a line.

Steven Chall in Minneapolis, MN =[;-)

PS Here is an alphabetical listing of a few of the programs that are
available. There are several other programs that may be better choices
for non-english speaking areas.

A&D - Ancestors and Descendants (~$50)
http://www.aia-and.com

AQ - Ancestral Quest (~$45 - $55)
http://www.ancestralquest.com

BK - Brother's Keeper (~$50) shareware
http://www.brotherskeeper.com

CFT - Cumberland Family Tree (shareware ~$45)
http://www.cf-software.com

FM - Family Matters ($25 shareware)
http://www.matterware.com

FO - Family Origins (~$30 - $50)
http://www.familyorigins.com

FTM - Family Tree Maker (~$20 - $70)
http://www.familytreemaker.com

Generations (~$50)
http://www.sierra.com/sierrahome/software/catalog/familytree

Heritage (for Mac)
http://www.eskimo.com/%7Egrandine/heritage.html

Ilanot - Hebrew capability (~$40)
http://www.jewishstore.com/Software/Ilanot.htm

KK - Kindred Konnections (free)
http://www.kindredkonnections.com

Legacy (~$50)
http://www.legacyfamilytree.com

PAF - Personal Ancestral File (free)
http://www.ldscatalog.com/cgi-bin/ncommerce3/CategoryDisplay?
cgrfnbr=373032&cgmenbr=1402&CGRY_NUM=1678&RoxStart=1&LocCode=FH

TMG - The Master Genealogist (~$80)
http://www.whollygenes.com

UFT - Ultimate Family Tree has been discontinued

MODERATOR NOTE: Also check JewishGen FAQ under "Computer Software"
at: http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html#Computers
Discussions of specific programs should be carried on privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Genealogy Software #general

steven.chall@...
 

We frequently see a request such as, "I am looking to purchase a software
program to keep track of my family tree. What is the best program I
should buy? pros and cons"

Since JewishGen cannot endorse any product(s), I usually respond
directly to the writer. However, I thought that a "generic" response
would be acceptable with JewishGen policy and perhaps preclude the
repeated request. The following is an excerpt of the response I
typically send out.

Your choice of which software program to use will be determined by how
"serious" a researcher you are, your comfort with the way each program
works and your pocketbook. Most are affordable and several are shareware
which allows you to test them before you spend any money.

Many people outgrow the intro programs within a year or two and then
have to transfer their data to another program. It is worth the
investment of time to try several before you put in too much time
entering your data into a program that you'll be unsatisfied with.

There is no *best* program!! Readers of the JewishGen Discussion Group
are using a wide variety of programs. The choice of what to purchase
depends upon what *you* want to do. Some people merely want to know the
family relationships so they can draw the familiar "tree". Everyone
includes at least basic BMD (Birth/Marriage/Death) data. Others want to
include locations for these events. Still others want to record many
other events in each individual's life. This may include photographs or
even sound recordings.

Some want to be "more professional" and record where they obtained each
piece of information and how reliable (surety) they consider it to be.
Then comes the question of what you plan to *do* with this data. Do you
want to write a family history book? Some programs automatically create
basic sentences >from the data you provide. These can be exported to a
word processor and polished for publication.

For the PC, many of the better programs can be examined for free to
assist you in making your decision. Shareware programs, like Brother's
Keeper and Cumberland Family Tree, allow total testing. Mid-range
programs, like Family Origins and Family Tree Maker, also have demos that
allow you to work with up to about 20-25 people in a family. Top of the
line programs, like Generations (the PC version of Reunion) and The
Master Genealogist offer many more bells and whistles that you may or may
not like/want.

I cannot comment on Ilanot, the only Hebrew oriented package, because
they would not provide any sort of trial or demo of their software for
review. At this time, it is the only one capable of easily printing in
Hebrew (assuming you have the fonts available).

Finally, do _not_ be swayed by the added CDs of data that accompany some
of the programs. Most are worthless for Jewish genealogists and others
have equivalent (and more up-to-date) information available on-line.

I hope this will get you started in your decision. My strongest advice
is to "try it before you buy it" one way or other. The features may not
be as important as the ease of working with the different screens for
entering and recalling your data. This is often a personal preference.
If you have other specific questions, don't hesitate to drop me a line.

Steven Chall in Minneapolis, MN =[;-)

PS Here is an alphabetical listing of a few of the programs that are
available. There are several other programs that may be better choices
for non-english speaking areas.

A&D - Ancestors and Descendants (~$50)
http://www.aia-and.com

AQ - Ancestral Quest (~$45 - $55)
http://www.ancestralquest.com

BK - Brother's Keeper (~$50) shareware
http://www.brotherskeeper.com

CFT - Cumberland Family Tree (shareware ~$45)
http://www.cf-software.com

FM - Family Matters ($25 shareware)
http://www.matterware.com

FO - Family Origins (~$30 - $50)
http://www.familyorigins.com

FTM - Family Tree Maker (~$20 - $70)
http://www.familytreemaker.com

Generations (~$50)
http://www.sierra.com/sierrahome/software/catalog/familytree

Heritage (for Mac)
http://www.eskimo.com/%7Egrandine/heritage.html

Ilanot - Hebrew capability (~$40)
http://www.jewishstore.com/Software/Ilanot.htm

KK - Kindred Konnections (free)
http://www.kindredkonnections.com

Legacy (~$50)
http://www.legacyfamilytree.com

PAF - Personal Ancestral File (free)
http://www.ldscatalog.com/cgi-bin/ncommerce3/CategoryDisplay?
cgrfnbr=373032&cgmenbr=1402&CGRY_NUM=1678&RoxStart=1&LocCode=FH

TMG - The Master Genealogist (~$80)
http://www.whollygenes.com

UFT - Ultimate Family Tree has been discontinued

MODERATOR NOTE: Also check JewishGen FAQ under "Computer Software"
at: http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html#Computers
Discussions of specific programs should be carried on privately.


FRIEDHOFFER #general

Curiousyl@...
 

New buds on a branch of my maternal family tree have revealed my
Grandmother had a sister previously unknown to me!
Please check the following details and see if anything clicks:
[am not sure of precise spelling of FRIEDHOFFER - written as it sounded]
Henya AVNER - fled Lemburg, Austria about 1922, settled in Palestine
married Adolph FRIEDHOFFER.
2 sons: Hirschel [Harry] and Fischel [Philip].
Thought to have settled in Tel Aviv.
Present whereabouts of descendants unknown.

TIA for any information.
Please reply privately.

Sylvia FURSHMAN NUSINOV
Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen FRIEDHOFFER #general

Curiousyl@...
 

New buds on a branch of my maternal family tree have revealed my
Grandmother had a sister previously unknown to me!
Please check the following details and see if anything clicks:
[am not sure of precise spelling of FRIEDHOFFER - written as it sounded]
Henya AVNER - fled Lemburg, Austria about 1922, settled in Palestine
married Adolph FRIEDHOFFER.
2 sons: Hirschel [Harry] and Fischel [Philip].
Thought to have settled in Tel Aviv.
Present whereabouts of descendants unknown.

TIA for any information.
Please reply privately.

Sylvia FURSHMAN NUSINOV
Florida