Date   

Jewish Genealogy of Greater Washington (DC) Sept. Meeting #general

Ben Okner <okner@...>
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
will be held at B'nai Israel Congregation on Sunday, September 10 at
1:30 for the social period with the meeting following >from 2 - 4 p.m.

Genealogical resources at the National Archives II in College Park are the
focus of our first meeting this year. The program features Sallyann Sack,
Roberta Solit, and Suzan Wynne who will discuss the Russian Consular
records and State Department records that contain information about U. S.
citizens living in Romania >from 1860 to 1941. Our experts will describe
what information can be found in these records and how to use them. A
special aspect of this program is that JGSGW members have indexed many of
these materials --including a recently completed database that will be
available for searching for the first time at our meeting. Come at 1:30
p.m. to view and search the new "Danzansky database" that was created
through the efforts of JGSGW volunteers.

B'nai Israel Congregation is located at 6301 Montrose Road, Rockville,
MD. See the JGSGW web site at www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw for directions.

Visitors are always welcome at our meetings.

Ben Okner
Corresponding Secretary

ben okner
4291 embassy park drive, n.w.
washington, d.c. 20016-3605


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogy of Greater Washington (DC) Sept. Meeting #general

Ben Okner <okner@...>
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington
will be held at B'nai Israel Congregation on Sunday, September 10 at
1:30 for the social period with the meeting following >from 2 - 4 p.m.

Genealogical resources at the National Archives II in College Park are the
focus of our first meeting this year. The program features Sallyann Sack,
Roberta Solit, and Suzan Wynne who will discuss the Russian Consular
records and State Department records that contain information about U. S.
citizens living in Romania >from 1860 to 1941. Our experts will describe
what information can be found in these records and how to use them. A
special aspect of this program is that JGSGW members have indexed many of
these materials --including a recently completed database that will be
available for searching for the first time at our meeting. Come at 1:30
p.m. to view and search the new "Danzansky database" that was created
through the efforts of JGSGW volunteers.

B'nai Israel Congregation is located at 6301 Montrose Road, Rockville,
MD. See the JGSGW web site at www.jewishgen.org/jgsgw for directions.

Visitors are always welcome at our meetings.

Ben Okner
Corresponding Secretary

ben okner
4291 embassy park drive, n.w.
washington, d.c. 20016-3605


Help with Ancestor Search #general

Emb623@...
 

Hi-
My name is Elie- I don't know who to ask about this, so I'm hoping you can
help. My girlfriend has a Jewish greatgrandmother >from her mom's side,
and we can't get married unless we find proof of this. Where can I start
looking. We have limited information on maiden names. I would be willing
to pay someone whatever it took to find this information for me, because
it will decide my future. Are there specialists that can do this? Please
help to point me in the right direction.

Thanks,
Elie Braun

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


Poland information -- SINGER & CORN #general

Astrobrit@...
 

I am looking for information regarding my ancestor David Singer born
20 Sep 1893, he Left Poland at the age of 17 in 1913. He came to England
with his uncle Nathan Singer. I am looking for any information that might
help me in my search. I am looking for the addresses of Janowo, I know
they are many of them, but hat I would like to find the addresses for the
nearest locality of them all so that I can write to them.

My other question is my other parental grandparents also came >from Poland
David Corn and my grandmother, the name of my grandmother which the family
are not sure of the spelling is Sprinser. What would the right spelling
be, the same for there surname Corn. I think this might be Kohen, would I
be right in thinking that.

Thank you all in advance for all your help, and I am hoping that I might
strike gold. My grandfather was never naturalised, so I am unable to check
this out

Irene Glover


Re: Help with Jewish Genealogy #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

In order to continue my search with very limited information I need to
know some of the history concerning Litvaks as a people. Also I am at a
dead end in my research for the Horodorker society. I know my grandfather
was a member. I believe this society was formed for immigrants. Was it
also named after a town? I know they came >from minsk.
Is it possible that you (or some predecessor) have slightly misread
"Horodorker"? Could it have been the "Horodenker" Society -- the
surnames Horodenker/ Gorodenker/ Orodenker refer to the city of Horodenka
or Gorodenka in the Ukraine.

(Or maybe there was also a Horodoker Society -- >from Horodok in Belorussia?)

Judith Romney Wegner
Providence, RI


Looking for HIMMELREICH/HEMELRIJK #general

hemelrijk ej <ej.hemelrijk@...>
 

Hello to everybody,

My family moved originally >from the Hanau area in Germany to Holland. I am
looking for any piece of information which can clear up their history.
Therefor I am especially looking for info about the Hanau and elder period.
If anybody has any info about the Himmelreich family (Dutch name is
Hemelrijk) please let me know. Thanks in advance

Ernst-Jan Hemelrijk


Anshe Sholom B'nai Israel congregation, Chicago #general

Theo Travis/ Madelyn Cohen <travis@...>
 

I am trying to trace descendants of Harris, Jacob and Charles Cohen,
founding members of the Ohave Shalom Mariampol Congregation in Chicago.
Today it is the Anshe Sholom B'nai Israel congregation.

I have written to the temple and had no response, and to the author of a
book on Landsmanshaften in Chicago that includes information on the
Mariampoler Aid Society. Again, I had no response. I had a response, but
no success, with the Chicago Jewish Historical Society.

Apparently several Cohens are listed in the 100th anniversary yearbook
for Ohave Sholom Mariampole (1970).

Does anyone belong to that temple or know any Cohens who do, who are
descendants of the founders? Does anyone know whether all of the
original Mariampolers were >from that city or >from surrounding villages
as well?

Thanks.

Madelyn Cohen Travis
travis@...


Re: First Name "Yehafet" #general

LenLW <lenlw@...>
 

Just wonder about a man's name - Yaphet - is there a precedent for that?

Leonard Nadler
Silver Spring, MD
Len


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help with Ancestor Search #general

Emb623@...
 

Hi-
My name is Elie- I don't know who to ask about this, so I'm hoping you can
help. My girlfriend has a Jewish greatgrandmother >from her mom's side,
and we can't get married unless we find proof of this. Where can I start
looking. We have limited information on maiden names. I would be willing
to pay someone whatever it took to find this information for me, because
it will decide my future. Are there specialists that can do this? Please
help to point me in the right direction.

Thanks,
Elie Braun

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Poland information -- SINGER & CORN #general

Astrobrit@...
 

I am looking for information regarding my ancestor David Singer born
20 Sep 1893, he Left Poland at the age of 17 in 1913. He came to England
with his uncle Nathan Singer. I am looking for any information that might
help me in my search. I am looking for the addresses of Janowo, I know
they are many of them, but hat I would like to find the addresses for the
nearest locality of them all so that I can write to them.

My other question is my other parental grandparents also came >from Poland
David Corn and my grandmother, the name of my grandmother which the family
are not sure of the spelling is Sprinser. What would the right spelling
be, the same for there surname Corn. I think this might be Kohen, would I
be right in thinking that.

Thank you all in advance for all your help, and I am hoping that I might
strike gold. My grandfather was never naturalised, so I am unable to check
this out

Irene Glover


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Help with Jewish Genealogy #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

In order to continue my search with very limited information I need to
know some of the history concerning Litvaks as a people. Also I am at a
dead end in my research for the Horodorker society. I know my grandfather
was a member. I believe this society was formed for immigrants. Was it
also named after a town? I know they came >from minsk.
Is it possible that you (or some predecessor) have slightly misread
"Horodorker"? Could it have been the "Horodenker" Society -- the
surnames Horodenker/ Gorodenker/ Orodenker refer to the city of Horodenka
or Gorodenka in the Ukraine.

(Or maybe there was also a Horodoker Society -- >from Horodok in Belorussia?)

Judith Romney Wegner
Providence, RI


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for HIMMELREICH/HEMELRIJK #general

hemelrijk ej <ej.hemelrijk@...>
 

Hello to everybody,

My family moved originally >from the Hanau area in Germany to Holland. I am
looking for any piece of information which can clear up their history.
Therefor I am especially looking for info about the Hanau and elder period.
If anybody has any info about the Himmelreich family (Dutch name is
Hemelrijk) please let me know. Thanks in advance

Ernst-Jan Hemelrijk


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Anshe Sholom B'nai Israel congregation, Chicago #general

Theo Travis/ Madelyn Cohen <travis@...>
 

I am trying to trace descendants of Harris, Jacob and Charles Cohen,
founding members of the Ohave Shalom Mariampol Congregation in Chicago.
Today it is the Anshe Sholom B'nai Israel congregation.

I have written to the temple and had no response, and to the author of a
book on Landsmanshaften in Chicago that includes information on the
Mariampoler Aid Society. Again, I had no response. I had a response, but
no success, with the Chicago Jewish Historical Society.

Apparently several Cohens are listed in the 100th anniversary yearbook
for Ohave Sholom Mariampole (1970).

Does anyone belong to that temple or know any Cohens who do, who are
descendants of the founders? Does anyone know whether all of the
original Mariampolers were >from that city or >from surrounding villages
as well?

Thanks.

Madelyn Cohen Travis
travis@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: First Name "Yehafet" #general

LenLW <lenlw@...>
 

Just wonder about a man's name - Yaphet - is there a precedent for that?

Leonard Nadler
Silver Spring, MD
Len


Very Young Marriages #general

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

Randi Jaspan wrote:
We have come across in our family tree what seems to be incredibly
young ages of marriage in the 1800's. It seems inconsistant with
the "norm" at the time. The ages would have been about 12-14 for females,
and around 15 for males. Has anyone else found this to be the confirmed
case in their family research? >>

Not in my family. However, in reviewing and databasing Archival records
from Herder Institute microfilms that the Courland Research Group
purchased, I have come across an enormous number of 15 year old fathers
and 12 - 15 year old mothers. The material dates >from 1798 to 1804 from
what is now present day Latvia.

Martha LEVINSON Lev-Zion, Israel


Re: SONENSCHEIN/1st Sedlcer Unter Verein #general

debjkay <debjkay@...>
 

Have you tried looking up passenger manifests at the Mormon Family History
Center? I also live near LA, and the Santa Monica Temple has a complete
set of immigration manifests >from 1986-1940 [Mod Note: probably meant 1896
or 1886 to 1940](or so) and indices. The manifests usually give you a lot
of info, including town of origin.

They also have indices to NYC death certificates, you need to search by
borough by year, but then can order >from NYC with the certificate name.

Incidentally, I have family >from Siedlce, and just wanted to let you know
that it is a "province" (gubernia in Polish) as well as the main city in
the Province. Also, immigrants sometimes came >from smaller towns "near" a
city, and in America stated they are "from" that city, the way I would say
I'm >from LA, although you would have to look in another adjacent county
for my records.

The passenger manifests are great for this. In the FHC in LA they are
separated >from the other films in a corner of their own, and Labeled, so
you do not need to do much computer searching. The staff, while extremely
eager to help, is sometimes made up of volunteers who are not as familiar
with some of the materials. I am very grateful for all the help I have
gotten, but just wanted to point out that I found out "by accident" about
the segregation of the films, as the two volunteers I asked kept telling
me to look under the numerical film number only. Passenger Manifests also
show, of course, the whole family that arrived (though All of my
grandparents' families came in pieces, but if one sibling was in America,
his or her address is given, and you can then check census records-- in LA
FHC, and there is a NY census, as well as the US Census, and it is much
harder to access, though worth it. It will give dates and locations of
naturalizations sometimes)

Also, have you tried the Social Security Death Index? You can find this
under ancestry.com. You can obtain for $7 the actual (well a copy)
application for the number in the person's own hand, including town of
origin (though some "cheated" and put "Poland" only) and mother's maiden
name.

The numbers came into existence in 1936, but for the individual you seek,
try bothers and sisters. That's how I found towns for my grandparents in
two cases, each had 5 siblings, and two in each case listed the exact town,
the rest, including gparents put "Russia" or "Poland". It was also the
first way I found out that my great-grandmother's name was "Faiga Brucha",
rather than "Bertha", the only name I knew. This enabled me to find her
Polish birth records (once again, my grandmother listed only Bertha, it was
a sibling)

Hope this is not too much information. You also asked about the National
Archives and Naturalization papers, but many older people did not get
naturalized, and some children were naturalized under their parent's names.
Good FAQ on Jewishgen about this, bottom line, I have looked at this after
the above. Also, if you find the Passenger Manifests, there may be an INS
number written near the name of the individual, which was used to get a
"Certificate of Arrival" for Naturalization. Using this number, and
another Jewishgen FAQ, you can give the NA more information and get much
quicker of a response.

The second problem with the NA (I hate to say problem, as they have also
been wonderful, let's say disadvantage) is that many people were
naturalized in local (county) courts, and these records must be accessed
through the county clerk. NYC has five counties (the Brooklyn index for
some years is on line with a search function), and they would not be able
to find these records.

As for your last inquiry re: cemetery, do you have a picture of the graves?
I have gotten Beth David to photograph for me, there may have been a
charge, say $7 or $10, and you can then get the father's name of the
person off of the tombstone. They may have info on the burial society
(there is a Jewishgen cemetery site on NYC Cemeteries that has some of
this).

Good luck.

Debra Kay
debjkay@...
Simi Valley, Ca

Searching LEWITA, BUCHBINDER, ZLOT Siedlce, Sokolow, Wenegorow

From: R Rose <singsong@...>
I am brand new at this, thanks for understanding, I'm sure to get better
at it.

Can anyone tell me what the First Sedlcer Unter Verein and whether there
are records available on this organization or other Sedlcers? We are
researching our grandfather, Max Sonshine.

We know that he came to the US in about 1903 >from Sedlce Poland
(supposedly near Gdansk/Gdanya) and died in an accident in Manhattan NY
in May, 1931.
He and his wife are buried in Beth David cemetery in Nassau Co, NY. We
assume he immigrated to NY City. There is a notation about his working in
coal mines in Pennsylvania, and his death certificate indicates his
occupation as toolmaker. I know the original name was Sonenschein or
Sonnenschein.

The burial plot was identified by Beth David cemetery as part of 1st
Sedlcer Unter Verein. No dates of birth are given, as both records show
their age in this format: 46/0/0. His parents, Rose Cohen and Joseph
Sonshine are shown on the death certificate only as coming >from Poland.

I have a photo showing a family of at least 6 or 8 brothers but with no
notations. I have a few more fragments, one child might have been born in
Poland when Max would have been 17 or 18. This child called Frank might
have been named Isaac.

Any direction someone might share for pursuing this would be most
appreciated, the organization or burial society (?) should probably be my
first step. I am located in Southern California and could go to Laguna
Niguel for the Federal records if it makes sense.
MODERATOR NOTE: The JewishGen FAQ that was referenced in this post is
the best place to start for a novice genealogist. It can be accessed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html>.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Very Young Marriages #general

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

Randi Jaspan wrote:
We have come across in our family tree what seems to be incredibly
young ages of marriage in the 1800's. It seems inconsistant with
the "norm" at the time. The ages would have been about 12-14 for females,
and around 15 for males. Has anyone else found this to be the confirmed
case in their family research? >>

Not in my family. However, in reviewing and databasing Archival records
from Herder Institute microfilms that the Courland Research Group
purchased, I have come across an enormous number of 15 year old fathers
and 12 - 15 year old mothers. The material dates >from 1798 to 1804 from
what is now present day Latvia.

Martha LEVINSON Lev-Zion, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: SONENSCHEIN/1st Sedlcer Unter Verein #general

debjkay <debjkay@...>
 

Have you tried looking up passenger manifests at the Mormon Family History
Center? I also live near LA, and the Santa Monica Temple has a complete
set of immigration manifests >from 1986-1940 [Mod Note: probably meant 1896
or 1886 to 1940](or so) and indices. The manifests usually give you a lot
of info, including town of origin.

They also have indices to NYC death certificates, you need to search by
borough by year, but then can order >from NYC with the certificate name.

Incidentally, I have family >from Siedlce, and just wanted to let you know
that it is a "province" (gubernia in Polish) as well as the main city in
the Province. Also, immigrants sometimes came >from smaller towns "near" a
city, and in America stated they are "from" that city, the way I would say
I'm >from LA, although you would have to look in another adjacent county
for my records.

The passenger manifests are great for this. In the FHC in LA they are
separated >from the other films in a corner of their own, and Labeled, so
you do not need to do much computer searching. The staff, while extremely
eager to help, is sometimes made up of volunteers who are not as familiar
with some of the materials. I am very grateful for all the help I have
gotten, but just wanted to point out that I found out "by accident" about
the segregation of the films, as the two volunteers I asked kept telling
me to look under the numerical film number only. Passenger Manifests also
show, of course, the whole family that arrived (though All of my
grandparents' families came in pieces, but if one sibling was in America,
his or her address is given, and you can then check census records-- in LA
FHC, and there is a NY census, as well as the US Census, and it is much
harder to access, though worth it. It will give dates and locations of
naturalizations sometimes)

Also, have you tried the Social Security Death Index? You can find this
under ancestry.com. You can obtain for $7 the actual (well a copy)
application for the number in the person's own hand, including town of
origin (though some "cheated" and put "Poland" only) and mother's maiden
name.

The numbers came into existence in 1936, but for the individual you seek,
try bothers and sisters. That's how I found towns for my grandparents in
two cases, each had 5 siblings, and two in each case listed the exact town,
the rest, including gparents put "Russia" or "Poland". It was also the
first way I found out that my great-grandmother's name was "Faiga Brucha",
rather than "Bertha", the only name I knew. This enabled me to find her
Polish birth records (once again, my grandmother listed only Bertha, it was
a sibling)

Hope this is not too much information. You also asked about the National
Archives and Naturalization papers, but many older people did not get
naturalized, and some children were naturalized under their parent's names.
Good FAQ on Jewishgen about this, bottom line, I have looked at this after
the above. Also, if you find the Passenger Manifests, there may be an INS
number written near the name of the individual, which was used to get a
"Certificate of Arrival" for Naturalization. Using this number, and
another Jewishgen FAQ, you can give the NA more information and get much
quicker of a response.

The second problem with the NA (I hate to say problem, as they have also
been wonderful, let's say disadvantage) is that many people were
naturalized in local (county) courts, and these records must be accessed
through the county clerk. NYC has five counties (the Brooklyn index for
some years is on line with a search function), and they would not be able
to find these records.

As for your last inquiry re: cemetery, do you have a picture of the graves?
I have gotten Beth David to photograph for me, there may have been a
charge, say $7 or $10, and you can then get the father's name of the
person off of the tombstone. They may have info on the burial society
(there is a Jewishgen cemetery site on NYC Cemeteries that has some of
this).

Good luck.

Debra Kay
debjkay@...
Simi Valley, Ca

Searching LEWITA, BUCHBINDER, ZLOT Siedlce, Sokolow, Wenegorow

From: R Rose <singsong@...>
I am brand new at this, thanks for understanding, I'm sure to get better
at it.

Can anyone tell me what the First Sedlcer Unter Verein and whether there
are records available on this organization or other Sedlcers? We are
researching our grandfather, Max Sonshine.

We know that he came to the US in about 1903 >from Sedlce Poland
(supposedly near Gdansk/Gdanya) and died in an accident in Manhattan NY
in May, 1931.
He and his wife are buried in Beth David cemetery in Nassau Co, NY. We
assume he immigrated to NY City. There is a notation about his working in
coal mines in Pennsylvania, and his death certificate indicates his
occupation as toolmaker. I know the original name was Sonenschein or
Sonnenschein.

The burial plot was identified by Beth David cemetery as part of 1st
Sedlcer Unter Verein. No dates of birth are given, as both records show
their age in this format: 46/0/0. His parents, Rose Cohen and Joseph
Sonshine are shown on the death certificate only as coming >from Poland.

I have a photo showing a family of at least 6 or 8 brothers but with no
notations. I have a few more fragments, one child might have been born in
Poland when Max would have been 17 or 18. This child called Frank might
have been named Isaac.

Any direction someone might share for pursuing this would be most
appreciated, the organization or burial society (?) should probably be my
first step. I am located in Southern California and could go to Laguna
Niguel for the Federal records if it makes sense.
MODERATOR NOTE: The JewishGen FAQ that was referenced in this post is
the best place to start for a novice genealogist. It can be accessed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html>.


Re: Physicians directory #general

Larry E. Oppenheimer <leoppen@...>
 

Fmode@... wrote:
I am in need of a lookup in a directory of physicians. This was
recommended to me through the German Jewish SIG but I cannot locate such
a book. The individual I seek was a first cousin of my grandmother and
apparently a well known physician in the early part of the 20th century
in the Philadelphia area- name Joseph LANGBORD. I would be eternally
grateful if someone could look this gent up and respond privately to me.
We hope to find his birthplace and parents names. TIA

The National Genealogical Society <http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/>
maintains an archive of records of deceased physicians. e-mail them at
library@... or write to National Genealogical Society, 4527
17th Street North, Arlington, Va 22207. Phone 1-800-473-060 ext.331.
I found them to be very helpful.

Larry


Re: Perhaps Jewish Ancestry #general

Reed <dak.reed@...>
 

Michael Bernet wrote:
Spelling of names was quite loose in those days. His Hebrew name may
have been Me'ir. As for his knowledge of Spanish, the overwhelming
majority of London Jews at the time were Sfardim, and he may have
learned the language >from them. And these Sfardi Jews had come from
Holland.
and Stan Goodman added:
Very likely, indeed. And if his name was Me'ir, and if he was known by
the Meere surname in England, that suggests that he had no surname at
all in Holland, which would not have been unusual.
Another possibility: that it was his patronymic, and not his given
name, that was Me'ir, e.g. Ya'akov ben Me'ir, again suggesting that he
had no surname before arriving in England.
Stan's theory is likely correct and surely this very lack of an
established family name, which, if Mr Meeres were indeed >from a Spanish &
Portuguese family in Amsterdam one would certainly expect him to have, is
indicative of an Ashkenazi origin?

Other listers have either quoted >from or recommended the publication JHSE
Misc. vi, which contains both the 1695 London census information as it
pertains to Jews and the burial register of the S&P Bethahaim Velho
(1657-1733). The census does indeed list 5 families of MEERES (noting that
two of them are probably not Jewish) and in fact suggests that the
remaining three are Ashkenazim rather than Sefardim and this would seem to
tally with the lack of any MEERES burials in the S&P old cemetery.

So, how did Mr. Meeres know enough Spanish to translate? Michael Bernet is
probably spot-on in suggesting that the Ashkenazi Me'ir had had close
contact with the Spanish & Portuguese community in Amsterdam, London or
even further afield (Curacao possibly?) and thus picked up a language very
useful to his economic and social advancement within the Atlantic trading
network of the western Sephardi Diaspora.

David A Reed