Date   

Searching for DATZKOVSKY and BORIGNIKOV #ukraine

Alfred E Lipsey <LIPSEYA@...>
 

Searching for descendants and relatives of Wolfert DATZKOVSKY from
Gorodishche (Cerkassy), Ukraine and wife Alta BORIGNIKOV >from Korsun
(Cherkassy), Ukraine.
Alfred Lipsey
lipseya@...


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Searching for DATZKOVSKY and BORIGNIKOV #ukraine

Alfred E Lipsey <LIPSEYA@...>
 

Searching for descendants and relatives of Wolfert DATZKOVSKY from
Gorodishche (Cerkassy), Ukraine and wife Alta BORIGNIKOV >from Korsun
(Cherkassy), Ukraine.
Alfred Lipsey
lipseya@...


Searching for KRAVIZTSKY and REZNIK #ukraine

Alfred E Lipsey <LIPSEYA@...>
 

Searching for descendants and relatives of Nachem KRIVITZKY and Seital
REZNIK >from Zlatopol, Ukraine.
Alfred Lipsey
lipseya@...


Samgorodok #ukraine

Altefox@...
 

Can anyone help me with information re the following: My father was born in
Samgorodok, Ukraine. If my memory serves me correctly he said the town was
near Kiev. Unfortunately when researching it there are 3 Samgorodoks in that
area. Does anyone have any ideas how I could isolate which town it was?
Thanks.
Len Chernos


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Searching for KRAVIZTSKY and REZNIK #ukraine

Alfred E Lipsey <LIPSEYA@...>
 

Searching for descendants and relatives of Nachem KRIVITZKY and Seital
REZNIK >from Zlatopol, Ukraine.
Alfred Lipsey
lipseya@...


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Samgorodok #ukraine

Altefox@...
 

Can anyone help me with information re the following: My father was born in
Samgorodok, Ukraine. If my memory serves me correctly he said the town was
near Kiev. Unfortunately when researching it there are 3 Samgorodoks in that
area. Does anyone have any ideas how I could isolate which town it was?
Thanks.
Len Chernos


Re: Jettel is Zhetel and also Dzyatlava #general

RobinnM@...
 

Dear JewishGen:

Udi Cain posted a message on Sept. 27, 2000 asking about a town called
"Jettel" in the Grodno District of Tzarist Russia.

The town mentioned on her documents as "Jettel, Grodno" is usually spelled
"Zhetel" and is now in Belarus. It was called "Dzienzciol' in Polish and is
now spelled "Dzyatlava" on the map.

It is still difficult and frustrating to do research on Zhetel; however, a
very small group of Zhetel records were found in the Bialystok Archives in
Poland and are now indexed in the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland Project's
database. You can do a search there at: http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/

Please contact me privately for more information on Zhetel. Udi joins a
large and enthusiastic group of researchers who are interested in this very
special town. (Some of my best friends are Zhetlers)

Best wishes for a Happy New Year.
Robinn Magid
A Zhetler by Marriage
RobinnM@...


Honnannu #general

Hafcjf@...
 

My uncle's Hebrew name is Honnannu. I've never heard of it and I've checked
several books, but found no listing. Can anyone tell me what it's origin is
or what it means?

Thanks,

Cathy J. Flamholtz
Brent, AL
hafcjf@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jettel is Zhetel and also Dzyatlava #general

RobinnM@...
 

Dear JewishGen:

Udi Cain posted a message on Sept. 27, 2000 asking about a town called
"Jettel" in the Grodno District of Tzarist Russia.

The town mentioned on her documents as "Jettel, Grodno" is usually spelled
"Zhetel" and is now in Belarus. It was called "Dzienzciol' in Polish and is
now spelled "Dzyatlava" on the map.

It is still difficult and frustrating to do research on Zhetel; however, a
very small group of Zhetel records were found in the Bialystok Archives in
Poland and are now indexed in the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland Project's
database. You can do a search there at: http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/

Please contact me privately for more information on Zhetel. Udi joins a
large and enthusiastic group of researchers who are interested in this very
special town. (Some of my best friends are Zhetlers)

Best wishes for a Happy New Year.
Robinn Magid
A Zhetler by Marriage
RobinnM@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Honnannu #general

Hafcjf@...
 

My uncle's Hebrew name is Honnannu. I've never heard of it and I've checked
several books, but found no listing. Can anyone tell me what it's origin is
or what it means?

Thanks,

Cathy J. Flamholtz
Brent, AL
hafcjf@...


Zelig and equivalents #general

Harold Lewin <harmir@...>
 

In old synagogue records Zelig is often found as part of a double barrelled
name, namely Hebrew followed by Yiddish. For example an ancestor of mine is
recorded as Pinhas Zelig and there are scores of examples of this particular
combination in the registers of old London synagogues. Sometimes the name
appears as: Pinhas hamechune Zelig = Pinhas known as Zelig. Since the
English equivalent of Pinhas is Phineas (see James I bible) I suggest that
an accepted English equivalent of Zelig is Phineas. Shana Tova, Harold
Lewin - Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Zelig and equivalents #general

Harold Lewin <harmir@...>
 

In old synagogue records Zelig is often found as part of a double barrelled
name, namely Hebrew followed by Yiddish. For example an ancestor of mine is
recorded as Pinhas Zelig and there are scores of examples of this particular
combination in the registers of old London synagogues. Sometimes the name
appears as: Pinhas hamechune Zelig = Pinhas known as Zelig. Since the
English equivalent of Pinhas is Phineas (see James I bible) I suggest that
an accepted English equivalent of Zelig is Phineas. Shana Tova, Harold
Lewin - Jerusalem


Soundex reminder #belarus

Diane Jacobs <kingart@...>
 

I would just like to remind fellow researchers
that using the soundex codes to do any lookups
in any database whether it is online, at NARA,
or any library facilities, is only as good as the
codes you use.

Because of the many different spellings of surnames,
this is remind everyone that they should check all
the different spellings for any surname when looking
for a soundex codes.

It is a good lesson for me as I try to find my
Rabinowitz family. There are five different ways that
I know of of spelling Rabinowitz - Rabinowitz, Rabinovitz
Rabinowich, Rabinovich and Rabinowicz. I am sure
someone can come up with more, also.

My point is that to do a thorough search in any database
or microfilm collection, you must be sure to get all the
popular common spellings of the surname and check
and each and every code.

I learned this lesson while doing a lookup for the l920
census for Berkowitz as a favor for someone in England.
I was given the name Berkowicz to search but instantly
felt that in the US it was probably Berkowitz and Berkovitz.
I searched all three soundex code and finally found the
correct family under Berkowitz.

Hope this helps someone cover all the bases.

Diane Glazer Jacobs
New York


Belarus SIG #Belarus Soundex reminder #belarus

Diane Jacobs <kingart@...>
 

I would just like to remind fellow researchers
that using the soundex codes to do any lookups
in any database whether it is online, at NARA,
or any library facilities, is only as good as the
codes you use.

Because of the many different spellings of surnames,
this is remind everyone that they should check all
the different spellings for any surname when looking
for a soundex codes.

It is a good lesson for me as I try to find my
Rabinowitz family. There are five different ways that
I know of of spelling Rabinowitz - Rabinowitz, Rabinovitz
Rabinowich, Rabinovich and Rabinowicz. I am sure
someone can come up with more, also.

My point is that to do a thorough search in any database
or microfilm collection, you must be sure to get all the
popular common spellings of the surname and check
and each and every code.

I learned this lesson while doing a lookup for the l920
census for Berkowitz as a favor for someone in England.
I was given the name Berkowicz to search but instantly
felt that in the US it was probably Berkowitz and Berkovitz.
I searched all three soundex code and finally found the
correct family under Berkowitz.

Hope this helps someone cover all the bases.

Diane Glazer Jacobs
New York


Shana Tova #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

Dear Fellow LARG Researchers,

What a wonderful year we've had sharing so many good ideas, useful
information, and heartwarming stories with the members of the Lodz Area
Research Group!!! We wish each and every one of you a Shana Tova with good
health, many simchas, and continued success in all your endeavors for this
coming year. Chag Sameach to all.

Warmest regards,
Roni Seibel Liebowitz and Shirley Rotbein Flaum
LARG Coordinators


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Shana Tova #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

Dear Fellow LARG Researchers,

What a wonderful year we've had sharing so many good ideas, useful
information, and heartwarming stories with the members of the Lodz Area
Research Group!!! We wish each and every one of you a Shana Tova with good
health, many simchas, and continued success in all your endeavors for this
coming year. Chag Sameach to all.

Warmest regards,
Roni Seibel Liebowitz and Shirley Rotbein Flaum
LARG Coordinators


Re: Iranian/Persian Jews #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Yes, Megan.
There were definitely Sefardic-origin Jews in Iran. I have also
replied to this in a different form in Sefard Forum, but am doing
this differently in this forum to perhaps help others as well.
The Persian story involves lots of travelling back and forth,
some much earlier than the last century.
There are many families who remember Ladino great-grandmothers
(or further back) in Teheran. This was the result of Persian
merchants travelling to Turkey and finding wives whom they
brought back to Teheran and other cities.
We have recently learned the story of a distant Dardashti branch
that emigrated to Argentina more than 100 years ago, changed the
name, but whose merchant members returned every few years to
visit the remaining family in Isfahan.
There is another Argentinian family whose ancestor was a rabbi
in Iran, who went off to another Middle-Eastern country, married,
had children, and then emigrated to the New World. They are now
looking for the family which remained in Iran.
I personally know a family, related to us, which recounts the
story of their Italian-speaking Sefardic-origin ancestors
(probably around 1880s, great-great-grandparents) coming from
Leghorn, Italy, and settling in Kerman. The family name was lost
in time, and out of necessity intermarried with the local Jewish
community.
The family of the chief rabbi of Iran >from Kashan (and other
families >from Kashan) maintain they are originally >from Spain.
Merchants travelled all over the region: Iraq, Syria,
then-Palestine, Turkey, Lebanon, Afghanistan, to India, Burma,
Hong Kong, etc.
The pattern of marriages within families, both close and distant
relations, meant that the branches further afield maintained
relations with the families back home.
As well, a large group of Persian Jews >from Kashan settled in
Manchester UK very early on (1880 and later). Most were
originally in the textiles or carpet businesses. In the 1970s,
daughters of these Manchester families married into families back
in Teheran, completing the circle (now, however, mostly in Los
Angeles!).
Paris was home to quite a large Persian community very early. My
late father-in-law traveled on business frequently, always
stopping in Paris to see his childhood friends (he was born
around 1903 or so, birth records were not very organized in Iran,
then or ever!).
Milan, Italy and Hamburg, Germany were (still are) also home to
Persian Jewish communities.
And we aren't yet even talking about the merchants who travelled
to Russia!
One of my most fascinating experiences in the early 1970s was
visiting the large very ancient cemetery outside of Isfahan, a
place of pilgrimage for Jews all over Iran, called Sara bat Asher
(Sara daughter of Asher). A fenced-off portion of the cemetery
was for foreign Jews who had died in Isfahan. Beautifully carved
Sefardic-style tombs in many languages detailed the number of
foreigners who were Jewish in the city. Some stones dated to the
1700s. Several centuries ago, there were large-scale commercial
relations between Holland and Iran, Isfahan was the center of the
country and the political/commercial seat. Among the merchants
who visited the city were Sefardic Jews >from Amsterdam. We had
planned to make a photographic catalog of the cemetery when
political unrest began leading to the revolution in 1978, putting
an end to those plans.
You are right that there isn't very much written about this
period. People in the community have just recently become
interested in their family histories, books are now being
written, more are in the works, a very few have already been
published.
Yet, in spite of the newness of this interest, I keep coming
across families who have had detailed family genealogies already
passed down for several generations. They kept it quiet because
they felt no one was interested.
Good luck in your research,
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
dardasht@...


snipped for length:

Subject: Iranian/Persian Jews
From: "'Menna' Megan B. Kearns" <siguiria@u.washington.edu>
... However, my question is about my paternal Persian jewish
side. They were >from Tehran before moving to France in the
1950s. ... My question lies in that. According to the family and
to friends of the family, my paternal grandmother's side was Sephardic,
even though she was also Iranian. It is also possible my paternal
grandfather had Sephardic ancestry too. There seems to be some
connection/contact with earlier Ottoman (Syrian/Lebanese)/Babylonian
(Iraqi) Jews and also with some time in India. The family was originally
merchants, though some my immediate family worked for the late shah and
his father regarding national education.
I am wondering, since I have seen little to nothing on the subject, if the
Sephardim made it and settled in Persian/Iran also, perhaps via the
Ottoman empire?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Iranian/Persian Jews #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Yes, Megan.
There were definitely Sefardic-origin Jews in Iran. I have also
replied to this in a different form in Sefard Forum, but am doing
this differently in this forum to perhaps help others as well.
The Persian story involves lots of travelling back and forth,
some much earlier than the last century.
There are many families who remember Ladino great-grandmothers
(or further back) in Teheran. This was the result of Persian
merchants travelling to Turkey and finding wives whom they
brought back to Teheran and other cities.
We have recently learned the story of a distant Dardashti branch
that emigrated to Argentina more than 100 years ago, changed the
name, but whose merchant members returned every few years to
visit the remaining family in Isfahan.
There is another Argentinian family whose ancestor was a rabbi
in Iran, who went off to another Middle-Eastern country, married,
had children, and then emigrated to the New World. They are now
looking for the family which remained in Iran.
I personally know a family, related to us, which recounts the
story of their Italian-speaking Sefardic-origin ancestors
(probably around 1880s, great-great-grandparents) coming from
Leghorn, Italy, and settling in Kerman. The family name was lost
in time, and out of necessity intermarried with the local Jewish
community.
The family of the chief rabbi of Iran >from Kashan (and other
families >from Kashan) maintain they are originally >from Spain.
Merchants travelled all over the region: Iraq, Syria,
then-Palestine, Turkey, Lebanon, Afghanistan, to India, Burma,
Hong Kong, etc.
The pattern of marriages within families, both close and distant
relations, meant that the branches further afield maintained
relations with the families back home.
As well, a large group of Persian Jews >from Kashan settled in
Manchester UK very early on (1880 and later). Most were
originally in the textiles or carpet businesses. In the 1970s,
daughters of these Manchester families married into families back
in Teheran, completing the circle (now, however, mostly in Los
Angeles!).
Paris was home to quite a large Persian community very early. My
late father-in-law traveled on business frequently, always
stopping in Paris to see his childhood friends (he was born
around 1903 or so, birth records were not very organized in Iran,
then or ever!).
Milan, Italy and Hamburg, Germany were (still are) also home to
Persian Jewish communities.
And we aren't yet even talking about the merchants who travelled
to Russia!
One of my most fascinating experiences in the early 1970s was
visiting the large very ancient cemetery outside of Isfahan, a
place of pilgrimage for Jews all over Iran, called Sara bat Asher
(Sara daughter of Asher). A fenced-off portion of the cemetery
was for foreign Jews who had died in Isfahan. Beautifully carved
Sefardic-style tombs in many languages detailed the number of
foreigners who were Jewish in the city. Some stones dated to the
1700s. Several centuries ago, there were large-scale commercial
relations between Holland and Iran, Isfahan was the center of the
country and the political/commercial seat. Among the merchants
who visited the city were Sefardic Jews >from Amsterdam. We had
planned to make a photographic catalog of the cemetery when
political unrest began leading to the revolution in 1978, putting
an end to those plans.
You are right that there isn't very much written about this
period. People in the community have just recently become
interested in their family histories, books are now being
written, more are in the works, a very few have already been
published.
Yet, in spite of the newness of this interest, I keep coming
across families who have had detailed family genealogies already
passed down for several generations. They kept it quiet because
they felt no one was interested.
Good luck in your research,
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
dardasht@...


snipped for length:

Subject: Iranian/Persian Jews
From: "'Menna' Megan B. Kearns" <siguiria@u.washington.edu>
... However, my question is about my paternal Persian jewish
side. They were >from Tehran before moving to France in the
1950s. ... My question lies in that. According to the family and
to friends of the family, my paternal grandmother's side was Sephardic,
even though she was also Iranian. It is also possible my paternal
grandfather had Sephardic ancestry too. There seems to be some
connection/contact with earlier Ottoman (Syrian/Lebanese)/Babylonian
(Iraqi) Jews and also with some time in India. The family was originally
merchants, though some my immediate family worked for the late shah and
his father regarding national education.
I am wondering, since I have seen little to nothing on the subject, if the
Sephardim made it and settled in Persian/Iran also, perhaps via the
Ottoman empire?


Searching: Alan David Levin #belarus

Louis A Fine <loufine@...>
 

Dear Genners, Litvaken,Belarusans,

I am looking for Alan David LEVIN. Attended U of Wisconsin, circa
1957-58. Worked on Masters degree in Psychology. Went into marketing
research in NYC after graduation. Was a classical disk jockey in Boston
MA back in the late 40's early 50's.

Louis A. Fine
University Place WA. USA
<loufine@...>
________________________________________________________________
YOU'RE PAYING TOO MUCH FOR THE INTERNET!
Juno now offers FREE Internet Access!
Try it today - there's no risk! For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching: Alan David Levin #belarus

Louis A Fine <loufine@...>
 

Dear Genners, Litvaken,Belarusans,

I am looking for Alan David LEVIN. Attended U of Wisconsin, circa
1957-58. Worked on Masters degree in Psychology. Went into marketing
research in NYC after graduation. Was a classical disk jockey in Boston
MA back in the late 40's early 50's.

Louis A. Fine
University Place WA. USA
<loufine@...>
________________________________________________________________
YOU'RE PAYING TOO MUCH FOR THE INTERNET!
Juno now offers FREE Internet Access!
Try it today - there's no risk! For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.