Date   

Re: Yiddish pronunciation #general

Mike Glazer <glazer@...>
 

"Judith Romney Wegner" <jrw@Brown.edu> wrote in message
news:v03010d0db5fc56ca2813@[128.148.44.87]...
That's interesting; "shobbes" also happens to be the Anglo-Jewish
pronunciation! It rhymes with "lobbes" -- Anglo-Yiddish for "naughty
boy"
You might be interested to know that the word lobus (first letter pronounced
rather like a "w") is Polish for an urchin. I guess this is where the
Yiddish word comes from.

Mike Glazer
Oxford


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish pronunciation #general

Mike Glazer <glazer@...>
 

"Judith Romney Wegner" <jrw@Brown.edu> wrote in message
news:v03010d0db5fc56ca2813@[128.148.44.87]...
That's interesting; "shobbes" also happens to be the Anglo-Jewish
pronunciation! It rhymes with "lobbes" -- Anglo-Yiddish for "naughty
boy"
You might be interested to know that the word lobus (first letter pronounced
rather like a "w") is Polish for an urchin. I guess this is where the
Yiddish word comes from.

Mike Glazer
Oxford


Re: CHERNIE[NUSSBAUM} #general

Diane Jacobs <kingart@...>
 

I suggest you try the Bureau of Missing Persons
in Jerusalem. They have been very helpful in
finding people in Israel.

Diane Jacobs
New York

To all of our friends in Israel
I am trying to find the family of a cousin who emmigrated to Israel before
the war. My best information is that relatives visited her in the early
1980s. Her name was Mindl CZERNIE/CHERNIE/CHERNEY/SZERNY all I know is
that
she married a gentleman named NUSSBAUM and that there are children. Any
help would be greatly appreciated. Answer personally wcayf@ix.netcom.com
Thank You Nadine CHERNEY BROWN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: CHERNIE[NUSSBAUM} #general

Diane Jacobs <kingart@...>
 

I suggest you try the Bureau of Missing Persons
in Jerusalem. They have been very helpful in
finding people in Israel.

Diane Jacobs
New York

To all of our friends in Israel
I am trying to find the family of a cousin who emmigrated to Israel before
the war. My best information is that relatives visited her in the early
1980s. Her name was Mindl CZERNIE/CHERNIE/CHERNEY/SZERNY all I know is
that
she married a gentleman named NUSSBAUM and that there are children. Any
help would be greatly appreciated. Answer personally wcayf@ix.netcom.com
Thank You Nadine CHERNEY BROWN


Re: Records of Arrivals #general

Jeanne Gold <JeanneGold@...>
 

I noticed several replies which seemed
useful ... however, I'd like to share a tip told to me
several years ago which I've found to be most useful.

If you haven't a clue as to date or port, start with
New York indexes to passenger records, 1902-1942.
This is a soundex list of all known records of arrivals
into the port of NY.

With few exceptions, I've found just about everyone here!

Hope that helps,

Jeanne Gold
El Cajon, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Records of Arrivals #general

Jeanne Gold <JeanneGold@...>
 

I noticed several replies which seemed
useful ... however, I'd like to share a tip told to me
several years ago which I've found to be most useful.

If you haven't a clue as to date or port, start with
New York indexes to passenger records, 1902-1942.
This is a soundex list of all known records of arrivals
into the port of NY.

With few exceptions, I've found just about everyone here!

Hope that helps,

Jeanne Gold
El Cajon, CA


Re: There Once Was a Town #general

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

Am I incorrect that most of the pictures shown appeared to be that of a
middle class or upper middle class family? The still pictures and movies
seemed to show an economic level above that which I perceived would have
been normal for a Shtetl.

Mervyn Lakin
On that very subject the last issue of Avotaynu has an interesting
article: Gospodskaia Duma, Summer 1907; Voter Registration Lists, by
Harry D. Boonin.

At the same time this gives me occasion to air a long-felt "complaint"
:-)

Why do many of the Genners writing to this list not note which country
(or state if in US) they live in. If you, Mervyn, live in US there is
sense in me directing you to this article, because you can go to most any
library and see it. But, if you live in a far-out place - as I do - you
have no easy access to those libraries with loads of material relevant
for Jewish genealogists searching immigrant forefathers - not to talk of
the fact that ordered LDS-films take 5-6 months to reach our small FHC.

Regards,

Kirsten Gradel, Denmark


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: There Once Was a Town #general

Kirsten Gradel <kmgradel@...>
 

Am I incorrect that most of the pictures shown appeared to be that of a
middle class or upper middle class family? The still pictures and movies
seemed to show an economic level above that which I perceived would have
been normal for a Shtetl.

Mervyn Lakin
On that very subject the last issue of Avotaynu has an interesting
article: Gospodskaia Duma, Summer 1907; Voter Registration Lists, by
Harry D. Boonin.

At the same time this gives me occasion to air a long-felt "complaint"
:-)

Why do many of the Genners writing to this list not note which country
(or state if in US) they live in. If you, Mervyn, live in US there is
sense in me directing you to this article, because you can go to most any
library and see it. But, if you live in a far-out place - as I do - you
have no easy access to those libraries with loads of material relevant
for Jewish genealogists searching immigrant forefathers - not to talk of
the fact that ordered LDS-films take 5-6 months to reach our small FHC.

Regards,

Kirsten Gradel, Denmark


Re: "The Fur Worker" #general

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz, Dr. Ida C. Selavan <idayosef@...>
 

Workers in the Fur industry were Jews in the majority, and mostly
leftist. There are a number of publications in Yiddish which may
be of interest to you:
Fur Arbeter, 1916-1939, not all numbers available, NYPL and YIVO
Fur Arbeter Shtime, 1937, YIVO, possibly one of the splinter
groups.
Fur Arbeter Shtime, 1941-1942, NYPL and YIVO, probably
continuation by former group.
Furier Buletin, 1936, YIVO
Furiers Buletin, 1923, only one number available, YIVO.
Furiers Dzshoynt Kaunsil Buletin (Furriers Joint Council
Bulletin),1937-1939, YIVO
Furiers Shtime, 1935, YIVO
See "The immigrant labor press in North America, 1840's-1970's:
An annotated bibliography" Volume 2 "Migrants >from Eastern and
Southeastern Europe" Edited by Dirk Hoerder.(New York: Greenwood
Press, 1987) The last section, "The Jews" is by Ida C. Selavan.
Sincerely,
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

Al Wirtzbaum wrote:


While perusing the index of the Jewish Community Register of NYC
1917-1918 this afternoon, I came across mention of the trade paper
"The Fur Worker." Below is a transcript of what the librarian
printed out for me >from her computer when I asked her if she had
more information.

Call # *ZAN-T395 v. 1-14, no. 7, Oct. 3, 1916-Apr. 1931; n.s.
v. 1, no. 2-v. 2; Aug. 1937-July 1939.
Locations Science & Business Lib (Madison Avenue & 34th Street,
New York City)

Title The Fur worker [microform].
Vol./Date v. 1-14, no. 7, Oct. 3, 1916-Apr. 1931; n.s. v. 1-2, no.
12, July 1937-July 1939. Cf. Union list of serials.
Imprint [Long Island City, N.Y., International Fur workers' Union
of the United States and Canada.
Descript . ill. 30-44 cm.
Frequency Monthly, Aug. 1917-
Biweekly, Oct. 3, 1916-July 20, 1917.
Note Numbering continuous 1916-Apr. 1929 (v. 1-13, no. 1-145
[i.e. 1417]) and 1930-31 (v. 13-14, no. 1-7)
Publication suspended May 1929-Jan 1930; May 1931-June
1937.
Microfilm. v. 1-14, no. 7; Oct. 3, 1916-Apr. 1931. New York
:New York Public Library, 1956. 1 microfilm reels ; 35 mm.
Microfilm. new ser., v. 1, no. 2-v. 2; Aug. 1937-July,
1939.
Wisc. Conn. : Wisconsin State Historical Society, 1939. 1
microfilm reel ; 35 mm.
Oct. 3, 1916-July 20, 1917, title and text in English and
Yiddish; Aug. 1917- published in English and Yiddish
editions, the English edition with articles in French,
German, Italian and Russian.
Cont'd By Fur and leather worker.
Subject Fur workers -- Periodicals.
Add'l Name International Fur Workers Union of the United States
and Canada.
Alt Title Far arbeiter 1916-July 20, 1917.
Past Title Fur workers' hope v. 13, no. 5-v. 14, no. 7; Sept.
1930-Apr. 1931.

Al Wirtzbaum
L'shanah tovah!


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: "The Fur Worker" #general

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz, Dr. Ida C. Selavan <idayosef@...>
 

Workers in the Fur industry were Jews in the majority, and mostly
leftist. There are a number of publications in Yiddish which may
be of interest to you:
Fur Arbeter, 1916-1939, not all numbers available, NYPL and YIVO
Fur Arbeter Shtime, 1937, YIVO, possibly one of the splinter
groups.
Fur Arbeter Shtime, 1941-1942, NYPL and YIVO, probably
continuation by former group.
Furier Buletin, 1936, YIVO
Furiers Buletin, 1923, only one number available, YIVO.
Furiers Dzshoynt Kaunsil Buletin (Furriers Joint Council
Bulletin),1937-1939, YIVO
Furiers Shtime, 1935, YIVO
See "The immigrant labor press in North America, 1840's-1970's:
An annotated bibliography" Volume 2 "Migrants >from Eastern and
Southeastern Europe" Edited by Dirk Hoerder.(New York: Greenwood
Press, 1987) The last section, "The Jews" is by Ida C. Selavan.
Sincerely,
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

Al Wirtzbaum wrote:


While perusing the index of the Jewish Community Register of NYC
1917-1918 this afternoon, I came across mention of the trade paper
"The Fur Worker." Below is a transcript of what the librarian
printed out for me >from her computer when I asked her if she had
more information.

Call # *ZAN-T395 v. 1-14, no. 7, Oct. 3, 1916-Apr. 1931; n.s.
v. 1, no. 2-v. 2; Aug. 1937-July 1939.
Locations Science & Business Lib (Madison Avenue & 34th Street,
New York City)

Title The Fur worker [microform].
Vol./Date v. 1-14, no. 7, Oct. 3, 1916-Apr. 1931; n.s. v. 1-2, no.
12, July 1937-July 1939. Cf. Union list of serials.
Imprint [Long Island City, N.Y., International Fur workers' Union
of the United States and Canada.
Descript . ill. 30-44 cm.
Frequency Monthly, Aug. 1917-
Biweekly, Oct. 3, 1916-July 20, 1917.
Note Numbering continuous 1916-Apr. 1929 (v. 1-13, no. 1-145
[i.e. 1417]) and 1930-31 (v. 13-14, no. 1-7)
Publication suspended May 1929-Jan 1930; May 1931-June
1937.
Microfilm. v. 1-14, no. 7; Oct. 3, 1916-Apr. 1931. New York
:New York Public Library, 1956. 1 microfilm reels ; 35 mm.
Microfilm. new ser., v. 1, no. 2-v. 2; Aug. 1937-July,
1939.
Wisc. Conn. : Wisconsin State Historical Society, 1939. 1
microfilm reel ; 35 mm.
Oct. 3, 1916-July 20, 1917, title and text in English and
Yiddish; Aug. 1917- published in English and Yiddish
editions, the English edition with articles in French,
German, Italian and Russian.
Cont'd By Fur and leather worker.
Subject Fur workers -- Periodicals.
Add'l Name International Fur Workers Union of the United States
and Canada.
Alt Title Far arbeiter 1916-July 20, 1917.
Past Title Fur workers' hope v. 13, no. 5-v. 14, no. 7; Sept.
1930-Apr. 1931.

Al Wirtzbaum
L'shanah tovah!


Looking for info on Simon & Mary DUNST #general

Brahna Derr <bonnid@...>
 

While going through some papers that belonged to my grandparents, I
found the 50th anniversary (1952) booklet for Simon & Mary DUNST. No
one in my family knows of their relationship to my family. My
grandmother was Dora DUNST (m. Jacob KOFFLER) >from Kolomea & Zabolotov
(Ukraine.)

The info I have >from the invitation is
Simon DUNST m. Mary GREENBERG on August 24, 1902. They both came to
America as children.
Their children were
Samuel m. Lillian FINDER (1933)
Morris m. Roslyn PRESBERG (1931)
Isidore m. Muriel GREENBERG (1947)

If anyone has any knowledge of these people that could help me find
their relationship to Dora DUNST, please contact me privately.

Brahna Derr
San Diego, CA
bonnid@usa.net

I am researching --
Ukraine: KOFFLER, DUNST, GRUMER, SCHLOSSER, THAU (Kolomyya, Zabalotov,
Vashkowitz)
Poland: ROTH, KURTZ, THALER, KAHAN, STEIN (Mielec)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for info on Simon & Mary DUNST #general

Brahna Derr <bonnid@...>
 

While going through some papers that belonged to my grandparents, I
found the 50th anniversary (1952) booklet for Simon & Mary DUNST. No
one in my family knows of their relationship to my family. My
grandmother was Dora DUNST (m. Jacob KOFFLER) >from Kolomea & Zabolotov
(Ukraine.)

The info I have >from the invitation is
Simon DUNST m. Mary GREENBERG on August 24, 1902. They both came to
America as children.
Their children were
Samuel m. Lillian FINDER (1933)
Morris m. Roslyn PRESBERG (1931)
Isidore m. Muriel GREENBERG (1947)

If anyone has any knowledge of these people that could help me find
their relationship to Dora DUNST, please contact me privately.

Brahna Derr
San Diego, CA
bonnid@usa.net

I am researching --
Ukraine: KOFFLER, DUNST, GRUMER, SCHLOSSER, THAU (Kolomyya, Zabalotov,
Vashkowitz)
Poland: ROTH, KURTZ, THALER, KAHAN, STEIN (Mielec)


Re: Telephone calls to Israel #general

Stan Goodman <stan@...>
 

On Mon, 2 Oct 2000 19:37:17, dkazez@mail.wittenberg.edu (Daniel Kazez)
wrote:

If you happen to make telephone calls to Israel, please note that the
entire portions of Israel designated as "5" and "9" are considered, by
American telephone companies, to be cellular. In other words, these
two types of numbers: 972-5-xxx-xxxx and 972-9-xxx-xxxx. With
several of my telephone calling options (Quest, Blackstone, and
Essential.com), this means that calls to these two areas of Israel are
billed at a rate 20 times higher than normal. You may want to call
your long-distance carrier before placing calls to these two areas.

I find it essential to contact (by telephone) new branches of my
family tree when I discover them.
Your telephone company is confused. Numbers with the 5 prefix are
indeed those of the cellular-phone companies. The 9 prefix is an area
north of Tel-Aviv. I do not know how it could be "considered"
cellular.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

PLEASE NOTE: Messages to the "From:" or "Reply to:" address of this
posting will be not reach me. Please remove the "NOSPAM". Messages
containing HTML-formatted text will be deleted automatically, unread;
if you want to write to me, send plain text only.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Telephone calls to Israel #general

Stan Goodman <stan@...>
 

On Mon, 2 Oct 2000 19:37:17, dkazez@mail.wittenberg.edu (Daniel Kazez)
wrote:

If you happen to make telephone calls to Israel, please note that the
entire portions of Israel designated as "5" and "9" are considered, by
American telephone companies, to be cellular. In other words, these
two types of numbers: 972-5-xxx-xxxx and 972-9-xxx-xxxx. With
several of my telephone calling options (Quest, Blackstone, and
Essential.com), this means that calls to these two areas of Israel are
billed at a rate 20 times higher than normal. You may want to call
your long-distance carrier before placing calls to these two areas.

I find it essential to contact (by telephone) new branches of my
family tree when I discover them.
Your telephone company is confused. Numbers with the 5 prefix are
indeed those of the cellular-phone companies. The 9 prefix is an area
north of Tel-Aviv. I do not know how it could be "considered"
cellular.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

PLEASE NOTE: Messages to the "From:" or "Reply to:" address of this
posting will be not reach me. Please remove the "NOSPAM". Messages
containing HTML-formatted text will be deleted automatically, unread;
if you want to write to me, send plain text only.


Records of Arrivals #general

Roberta Berman <danber@...>
 

If your aunts arrived in New York, you should be able to find them in
the Soundex index to passenger arrivals for July 1, 1902 - Dec 31,
1943. This index is available at Mormon Family History Centers, at the
National Archives in Washington, DC and at several National Archives
branches including the one on Varick Street in New York City.

They could have arrived at a Canadian port and traveled by train to New
York. Indexes for these passenger lists are also available at the
Family History Centers and the National Archives, although I don't know
about the branch archives. Look for "Soundex 1895-June 30, 1924: Border
Entries through St. Albans District.

They may also have arrived at another East Coast port - Philadelphia,
Boston, Baltimore.

Roberta Wagner Berman
San Diego, CA

Two of my aunts arrived together in the U.S. between 1908 and 1910.
I have not been able to find them in passenger lists, they both
married citizens so they automatically became citizens so neither
filled out declarations or petitions for citizenship. The S.S
applications do not list ships that people arrive on. What other
forms could my aunts have filled out that would revealed the
date of their arrival and the ship they arrived on. I will go
through the Holland-America passenger lists this week, so that
doesn't count.
Regards, Sy of New York(pearlman@cybernex.net)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Records of Arrivals #general

Roberta Berman <danber@...>
 

If your aunts arrived in New York, you should be able to find them in
the Soundex index to passenger arrivals for July 1, 1902 - Dec 31,
1943. This index is available at Mormon Family History Centers, at the
National Archives in Washington, DC and at several National Archives
branches including the one on Varick Street in New York City.

They could have arrived at a Canadian port and traveled by train to New
York. Indexes for these passenger lists are also available at the
Family History Centers and the National Archives, although I don't know
about the branch archives. Look for "Soundex 1895-June 30, 1924: Border
Entries through St. Albans District.

They may also have arrived at another East Coast port - Philadelphia,
Boston, Baltimore.

Roberta Wagner Berman
San Diego, CA

Two of my aunts arrived together in the U.S. between 1908 and 1910.
I have not been able to find them in passenger lists, they both
married citizens so they automatically became citizens so neither
filled out declarations or petitions for citizenship. The S.S
applications do not list ships that people arrive on. What other
forms could my aunts have filled out that would revealed the
date of their arrival and the ship they arrived on. I will go
through the Holland-America passenger lists this week, so that
doesn't count.
Regards, Sy of New York(pearlman@cybernex.net)


Re: British Reform Movement baby girl naming #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Those Jews who belonged to the Reform as "three times a yearers"
(i.e. just normally go on Rosh HaShanna and Yom Kippur), would
they normally go to the synagogue for this special family occasion
as well?
**It may come as a shock to you, David, to learn that 50 years ago the
overwhelming majority of nominal members of the (orthodox) United
Synagogue were themselves three-times-a-year patrons. (Trust me, I know,
because my own parents and most of their friends were in that category --
though my sister and I chose to go to shul every Shobbes (as we pronounced
it back then).

**The fact is that most British Jews joined the United Synagogue out of a
kind of inertia, because it was the "established" Jewish Church of England
(quite literally -- established by Act of Parliament in 1870). And the
only reason many joined was to ensure their burial in a United Synagogue
cemetery when the time came. Paradoxically, I would go further and say
that in my experience those who chose to join the Reform Synagogue were far
more serious about their Judaism than the 3-times-a-year crowd members of
the United Synagogue. Many of the Reform members broke away >from the US
precisely because they wanted a type of service they could actually bear to
sit through on a regular basis on Shabbat -- along with a mode of practice
that they could find meaningful and not "a load of mumbo-jumbo" (as many
members of my own family irreverently described the United Synagogue's
rituals).

My questions are presented, because that there is someone in my
family whose Hebrew name is Sarah (the English name was not Sarah,
but one of its English equivalents), and had a grandmother who
was alive when the family memeber was born, with the same Hebrew name.
**As discussed at length on Jewishgen some time ago (more than once, I
think!) the superstition about not naming a child after a living ancestor
was characteristic only of East European Jewries. English, French and
German Ashkenazim seem to have had no qualms about bestowing the name of
living grandparents. My own family tree is bowed down with "Johns" and
"Adelaides" named after my great-grandparents; and many of those bearing
these names were born during the life of said ggps.

I am not sure whether this happened due to lack of knowledge
on Ashkenazi naming tradition, or because of a policy in this
movement to allow it, because of its halachik (Jewish law)
acceptability among Sephardim.
**No, as I indicated, it is merely a custom that arose because of
superstition about the "Evil Eye."

My understanding is that the level of Jewish awareness, because
of the trend to emancipate into British society, was lower in
those days then it is today, among both religious and irreligious
Jews. Thus, I can imagine an English name being chosen before
a Hebrew name by many people.
**To the extent that your last comments are accurate (though clearly you
mean "observant" vs. "non-observant" which is not at all the same thing as
"religious" vs. "irreligious") I would point out that having now lived
longer in the USA than in England where I was born and raised, I can
discern absolutely no differences between British and American Jews in
those particular respects to which you refer here!

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: British Reform Movement baby girl naming #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Those Jews who belonged to the Reform as "three times a yearers"
(i.e. just normally go on Rosh HaShanna and Yom Kippur), would
they normally go to the synagogue for this special family occasion
as well?
**It may come as a shock to you, David, to learn that 50 years ago the
overwhelming majority of nominal members of the (orthodox) United
Synagogue were themselves three-times-a-year patrons. (Trust me, I know,
because my own parents and most of their friends were in that category --
though my sister and I chose to go to shul every Shobbes (as we pronounced
it back then).

**The fact is that most British Jews joined the United Synagogue out of a
kind of inertia, because it was the "established" Jewish Church of England
(quite literally -- established by Act of Parliament in 1870). And the
only reason many joined was to ensure their burial in a United Synagogue
cemetery when the time came. Paradoxically, I would go further and say
that in my experience those who chose to join the Reform Synagogue were far
more serious about their Judaism than the 3-times-a-year crowd members of
the United Synagogue. Many of the Reform members broke away >from the US
precisely because they wanted a type of service they could actually bear to
sit through on a regular basis on Shabbat -- along with a mode of practice
that they could find meaningful and not "a load of mumbo-jumbo" (as many
members of my own family irreverently described the United Synagogue's
rituals).

My questions are presented, because that there is someone in my
family whose Hebrew name is Sarah (the English name was not Sarah,
but one of its English equivalents), and had a grandmother who
was alive when the family memeber was born, with the same Hebrew name.
**As discussed at length on Jewishgen some time ago (more than once, I
think!) the superstition about not naming a child after a living ancestor
was characteristic only of East European Jewries. English, French and
German Ashkenazim seem to have had no qualms about bestowing the name of
living grandparents. My own family tree is bowed down with "Johns" and
"Adelaides" named after my great-grandparents; and many of those bearing
these names were born during the life of said ggps.

I am not sure whether this happened due to lack of knowledge
on Ashkenazi naming tradition, or because of a policy in this
movement to allow it, because of its halachik (Jewish law)
acceptability among Sephardim.
**No, as I indicated, it is merely a custom that arose because of
superstition about the "Evil Eye."

My understanding is that the level of Jewish awareness, because
of the trend to emancipate into British society, was lower in
those days then it is today, among both religious and irreligious
Jews. Thus, I can imagine an English name being chosen before
a Hebrew name by many people.
**To the extent that your last comments are accurate (though clearly you
mean "observant" vs. "non-observant" which is not at all the same thing as
"religious" vs. "irreligious") I would point out that having now lived
longer in the USA than in England where I was born and raised, I can
discern absolutely no differences between British and American Jews in
those particular respects to which you refer here!

Judith Romney Wegner


Russian to English Translations #general

Maria Krane
 

Hi Genners,
I am looking for someone who can translate some copies of records >from
Russian to English. If you have used anyone who is reliable and reasonable,
please e-mail me privately. The person I had in mind is currently out of town.
Many thanks.
Maria Krane
Pembroke Pines, Florida USA
MariaKrane@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Russian to English Translations #general

Maria Krane
 

Hi Genners,
I am looking for someone who can translate some copies of records >from
Russian to English. If you have used anyone who is reliable and reasonable,
please e-mail me privately. The person I had in mind is currently out of town.
Many thanks.
Maria Krane
Pembroke Pines, Florida USA
MariaKrane@aol.com