Date   

Re: Father's mid name/son's first? #general

Harold Rabbie <hzrabbie@...>
 

Howie,

You don't say where your great-grandfather and his father are buried.
This particular naming pattern was almost universal among Dutch Ashkenazim.
A son's middle name was always his father's first name. And if a son was
named after his grandfather, then the son's first name was therefore the
same as his father's middle name.

Incidentally, the same applied to daughters. The daughter's middle name
was often her father's first name, even though that name was masculine.
So for example, my great-grandmother's name was Kitty Nathan Wins,
daughter of Nathan Levie Wins.

This naming pattern originates >from the Jewish custom of using patronymics,
i.e. X ben/bat Y, which predated the use of surnames.
--
Harold Zvi Rabbie
Los Gatos, California
http://members.home.net/hzrabbie


<JEDI318@...> wrote in message news:90.b857f68.2733190f@......

Genners,
My great-grandfather, Jacob Abrams (~1886-1940) was Yaakov in Hebrew.
On the tombstone it says "Yaakov ben Aron."

Now..I have a picture of the tombstone of his father, Aron (~1855 - ~1920)
and the Hebrew says "Aron Yaakov ben Pinchas."

Can anyone offer any perspective about Jacob's first name being the same
as his father's middle name. Doesn't this go against traditional
Ashkenazic naming??

Thanks!
-Howie Zakai
Staten Island & Binghamton, NY
Researching: ABRAMOVICH/ABRAMOWITZ (Silale, Lithuania);
MARK/MARKS (Lithuania, possibly Lida district); inter alia...


Only person researching KYJAWSKI? #general

Naidia Woolf <rnwoolf@...>
 

My paternal grandfather Simon Wolf KYJAWSKI was born in Lodz, Poland circa
1878. Grandfather left Poland (in the mid 1890's) when he was 15 or 17.
After arriving in England, he made his way to Birmingham where he
eventually married my grandmother, Annie Isaacs (in 1901).

So far I've been unable to trace my grandfather's roots in Poland. Two
years ago I wrote to Mr. Symcha Keller of the Jewish Community in Lodz,
asking him to check his records for an Isaac KYJAWSKI (variant spelling
KUJAWSKI), my great-grandfather. Mr. Keller sent me the death certificates
for an Icek (Izaak) KUJAWSKI son of Mojsze who died in 1937 aged 70 and a
Wolf KUJAWSKI (same father) who died in 1936 aged 69, on the assumption
that Icek was my great-grandfather. Obviously, neither of these individuals
could have been my great-grandfather but they might have been relatives.
According to Rabbi Joseph Schachtner of Yad Vashem the Russian "U" is
written as a "Y"; consequently I should be researching the name "KUJAWSKI."
About the same time I also wrote to the Society of Former Residents of Lodz
in Tel Aviv to ask if any of the society's members remembered my ancestors
from Lodz. (I never received a reply so assume the answer was negative.)
Rabbi Schachtner sent me several pages of German and French deportation
lists, including 3 pages for KUJAWSKI >from the Lodz ghetto lists. (Again),
it's possible that some of the victims may have been related to my paternal
grandfather but I have not been able to verify this. Naturally my fervent
hope is that my father's family left Poland before the war (or died of
natural causes in their country of birth).

To the best of my knowledge, my grandfather Simon KYJAWSKI never applied
for British Citizenship; there was no application for naturalization on
file at the Public Record Office at Kew (London, England) Consequently I
have no proof that my grandfather was born in (or at least came from) Lodz.
On his marriage certificate, my grandfather gave his father's name as Isaac
WOLF rather than KYJAWSKI (possibly because by that time my grandfather had
dropped KYJAWSKI and was using his 2nd given name of WOLF as his surname).

According to members of my family, my father's cousin Willie KYJAWSKI and
wife Regina visited the family in England before the 2nd world war (no
date, no year even) while en route for America or maybe Canada (the story
varies, depending on the source.) Because I know so little about Willie and
Regina, I've been unable to find out where they went or what happened to
them, and have given up looking for them or their descendants.

Although I've researched the 19 century (Lodz) vital records for my
KYJAWSKI family (including my grandfather's birth record and BMD records
for his parents and other family members) so far I haven't found any
definite matches.

If anyone is researching the name KYJAWSKI (or a variant thereof), please
contact me privately.

Naidia Woolf
San Francisco, CA
rnwoolf@...

Researching:
KYJAWSKI, Simon Wolf: Lodz, Poland
DROZDIASZ (DROZDASH, or variant thereof): Karczew, Poland
SAFIRSTEIN (SUPERSTIAN, or variant thereof): Karczew, Poland
ISAACS, Solomon: anywhere in Poland
ISAACS, Sarah (nee Morriss): anywhere in Poland


Lithuanian records sources? #general

Irene Newhouse <newhoir@...>
 

A professional researcher in Vilnius has found some interesting references
that he doesn't know how to follow up [and is pretty sure they're not in
Vilnius].

2 of my relatives were made members of the merchants 2 guild, & in 1915
were stricken >from the list for failure to present some form. The
researcher suspects they may have left town due to WWI - there were
armies fighting 100 km >from Vilnius at the time - or that the war
disrupted business to the point they couldn't pay the tax required to
remain in the merchant 2 guild. The records indicate
a reference number to the striking off in the records of the 'Treasury' or
'Treasurer' of Vilna Guberniya. Does anyone know about such records &
how one obtains copies?

The second reference: in a family list, it mentions that a 3rd family
member was exiled to Siberia >from the army via a decree of the Tsar. The
number of the decree is given. The army unit in which the relative was
serving is not. Does anyone know how I can get a copy of this decree?

Thanks!
Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI


Ancestry.com NYC Births and 1920 Census #general

Steve Harris <ccchs@...>
 

Because they are potentially useful to NYC researchers, I'd like to
clear up some things about two recent databases on Ancestry.com.

1. The "New York City Births, 1891-1902" database is just what it says.
It contains name, borough, birthdate, and certificate number, and can be
searched by these elements (you must use the correct date format). If an
ancestor is found, their certificate can be ordered >from the FHL (using
their site to find the appropriate microfilm roll) or >from the NYC
archives. Like most Ancestry.com databases, it is frustratingly
impossible to search by wild card. It also has some anomalies, such as
the Irish-ization of Esther Osherovitz to O'Sherovitz. Contrary to the
information displayed on Ancestry's site, it is not an extraction from
the usual hard-to-use and often illegible index books, because it has
full names and middle initials that are truncated in those books. It is
most likely taken >from index cards or the documents themselves. >from my
experience so far, it is (randomly) missing about 20% of the names in
the index books. It is still free, but won't be for much longer. We can
fervently hope that more records are posted in the future, or wait for
the NYC Archives to complete their long-awaited index automation
project.

2. The Census Images are part of Ancestry's larger, extremely ambitious
project to make all censuses available on the Web. They are census page
images of not-great, but usable, resolution. So far, the larger (i.e.,
all NYC) counties are not posted; the Ancestry rep I spoke to said they
will be in the next few weeks, though he was a bit skeptical. The site
also mentions that a head-of-household on-line index is being prepared,
which would be great if it actually happens. There is no 1920 index
on-line now, but the Enumeration District descriptions are on-line,
which facilitates searching by address.

Steve Harris
Berkeley, CA


room mate or two for UK conv. wanted #general

Gayle Riley <key2pst@...>
 

Non smoker is looking for a room mate or two for the UK conv...reply
privately..room rate 202+USD. a night..will arrive a day or two before
and will leave for Poland a day or so after..Gayle (Female)


Re: Female name: Gisha #general

Ury Link <uryl@...>
 

Dear Genners,
The female name Gisha was nickname to the Hebrew name Tova. The way
is very easy. Tova nickname is normally Gitel or Gutel or Gitta in
Yiddish. Special in Russia the Jews used to called Gitel as Gisel and
Gita as Gisha . My source is the "Beit Shmuel" in his commentary to
the "Shulchan Aruch" and >from "Ohalei Shem" by Solomon Ganzfried,
Ungevar 1878. It is very common in words or names that the T is changed
to a S. the best sample is the Hebrew word Shabat that change in Yiddish
to Shabes.
Best regards
Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland


Harris Diamond from Blaenclydach, Glamorgan, Wales, Gt Britain #general

Rica Goldberg
 

Dear Genners

Once again I have received a Certificate of Naturalisation, which is not
for my Harris Diamond but someone elses.

It states he was born in Wolkowysk, Grodno, Russia in July 1874 and that
his parents were Archibald and Freda Diamond.

If you are sure that this is someone on your family tree, I will be only
too happy to let you have it.

Rica B Goldberg
Manchester, England

Still researching the following:-
1) KAMINSKY (possibly KAMENSHCHIK) Yanova (Jonava) nr Kovno, Lithuania2)
Nosson Eliazer, Harris, Joseph and Sarah DIAMOND (possibly DIMONT or DIAMONT)
from Kovno, Lithuania; 3) Newman, Emanuel, Rachel & Esther LEVY, Chana &
Yehuda LEV >from KROSNIEWICE in Poland; 4) Isaac & Rebecca COHEN - Poland;
5) Chaim and Rebecca ESTRY - Poland; 6) GOLDBERG (possibly) SCHELENGER in
Yiddish SCHLUZITSIL) Kovno, 7) BERLINSKY >from ????;


Re: observation while walking in a Jewish cemetery #general

P. S. WYANT <p.wyant@...>
 

Perhaps this response was posted has already been posted privately to
Mr. Hall, but I understand the custom is said to have originated during
the Exodus. When someone died and was buried into the hard ground of the
Sinai desert, his or her grave was covered with a pile of rocks to
prevent being dug up by wild animals. This original necessity of the
Exodus has been remembered and preserved to the present day by leaving
leaving rocks as a sign of one's presence.

Peter Wyant
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Father's mid name/son's first? #general

Harold Rabbie <hzrabbie@...>
 

Howie,

You don't say where your great-grandfather and his father are buried.
This particular naming pattern was almost universal among Dutch Ashkenazim.
A son's middle name was always his father's first name. And if a son was
named after his grandfather, then the son's first name was therefore the
same as his father's middle name.

Incidentally, the same applied to daughters. The daughter's middle name
was often her father's first name, even though that name was masculine.
So for example, my great-grandmother's name was Kitty Nathan Wins,
daughter of Nathan Levie Wins.

This naming pattern originates >from the Jewish custom of using patronymics,
i.e. X ben/bat Y, which predated the use of surnames.
--
Harold Zvi Rabbie
Los Gatos, California
http://members.home.net/hzrabbie


<JEDI318@...> wrote in message news:90.b857f68.2733190f@......

Genners,
My great-grandfather, Jacob Abrams (~1886-1940) was Yaakov in Hebrew.
On the tombstone it says "Yaakov ben Aron."

Now..I have a picture of the tombstone of his father, Aron (~1855 - ~1920)
and the Hebrew says "Aron Yaakov ben Pinchas."

Can anyone offer any perspective about Jacob's first name being the same
as his father's middle name. Doesn't this go against traditional
Ashkenazic naming??

Thanks!
-Howie Zakai
Staten Island & Binghamton, NY
Researching: ABRAMOVICH/ABRAMOWITZ (Silale, Lithuania);
MARK/MARKS (Lithuania, possibly Lida district); inter alia...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Only person researching KYJAWSKI? #general

Naidia Woolf <rnwoolf@...>
 

My paternal grandfather Simon Wolf KYJAWSKI was born in Lodz, Poland circa
1878. Grandfather left Poland (in the mid 1890's) when he was 15 or 17.
After arriving in England, he made his way to Birmingham where he
eventually married my grandmother, Annie Isaacs (in 1901).

So far I've been unable to trace my grandfather's roots in Poland. Two
years ago I wrote to Mr. Symcha Keller of the Jewish Community in Lodz,
asking him to check his records for an Isaac KYJAWSKI (variant spelling
KUJAWSKI), my great-grandfather. Mr. Keller sent me the death certificates
for an Icek (Izaak) KUJAWSKI son of Mojsze who died in 1937 aged 70 and a
Wolf KUJAWSKI (same father) who died in 1936 aged 69, on the assumption
that Icek was my great-grandfather. Obviously, neither of these individuals
could have been my great-grandfather but they might have been relatives.
According to Rabbi Joseph Schachtner of Yad Vashem the Russian "U" is
written as a "Y"; consequently I should be researching the name "KUJAWSKI."
About the same time I also wrote to the Society of Former Residents of Lodz
in Tel Aviv to ask if any of the society's members remembered my ancestors
from Lodz. (I never received a reply so assume the answer was negative.)
Rabbi Schachtner sent me several pages of German and French deportation
lists, including 3 pages for KUJAWSKI >from the Lodz ghetto lists. (Again),
it's possible that some of the victims may have been related to my paternal
grandfather but I have not been able to verify this. Naturally my fervent
hope is that my father's family left Poland before the war (or died of
natural causes in their country of birth).

To the best of my knowledge, my grandfather Simon KYJAWSKI never applied
for British Citizenship; there was no application for naturalization on
file at the Public Record Office at Kew (London, England) Consequently I
have no proof that my grandfather was born in (or at least came from) Lodz.
On his marriage certificate, my grandfather gave his father's name as Isaac
WOLF rather than KYJAWSKI (possibly because by that time my grandfather had
dropped KYJAWSKI and was using his 2nd given name of WOLF as his surname).

According to members of my family, my father's cousin Willie KYJAWSKI and
wife Regina visited the family in England before the 2nd world war (no
date, no year even) while en route for America or maybe Canada (the story
varies, depending on the source.) Because I know so little about Willie and
Regina, I've been unable to find out where they went or what happened to
them, and have given up looking for them or their descendants.

Although I've researched the 19 century (Lodz) vital records for my
KYJAWSKI family (including my grandfather's birth record and BMD records
for his parents and other family members) so far I haven't found any
definite matches.

If anyone is researching the name KYJAWSKI (or a variant thereof), please
contact me privately.

Naidia Woolf
San Francisco, CA
rnwoolf@...

Researching:
KYJAWSKI, Simon Wolf: Lodz, Poland
DROZDIASZ (DROZDASH, or variant thereof): Karczew, Poland
SAFIRSTEIN (SUPERSTIAN, or variant thereof): Karczew, Poland
ISAACS, Solomon: anywhere in Poland
ISAACS, Sarah (nee Morriss): anywhere in Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lithuanian records sources? #general

Irene Newhouse <newhoir@...>
 

A professional researcher in Vilnius has found some interesting references
that he doesn't know how to follow up [and is pretty sure they're not in
Vilnius].

2 of my relatives were made members of the merchants 2 guild, & in 1915
were stricken >from the list for failure to present some form. The
researcher suspects they may have left town due to WWI - there were
armies fighting 100 km >from Vilnius at the time - or that the war
disrupted business to the point they couldn't pay the tax required to
remain in the merchant 2 guild. The records indicate
a reference number to the striking off in the records of the 'Treasury' or
'Treasurer' of Vilna Guberniya. Does anyone know about such records &
how one obtains copies?

The second reference: in a family list, it mentions that a 3rd family
member was exiled to Siberia >from the army via a decree of the Tsar. The
number of the decree is given. The army unit in which the relative was
serving is not. Does anyone know how I can get a copy of this decree?

Thanks!
Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ancestry.com NYC Births and 1920 Census #general

Steve Harris <ccchs@...>
 

Because they are potentially useful to NYC researchers, I'd like to
clear up some things about two recent databases on Ancestry.com.

1. The "New York City Births, 1891-1902" database is just what it says.
It contains name, borough, birthdate, and certificate number, and can be
searched by these elements (you must use the correct date format). If an
ancestor is found, their certificate can be ordered >from the FHL (using
their site to find the appropriate microfilm roll) or >from the NYC
archives. Like most Ancestry.com databases, it is frustratingly
impossible to search by wild card. It also has some anomalies, such as
the Irish-ization of Esther Osherovitz to O'Sherovitz. Contrary to the
information displayed on Ancestry's site, it is not an extraction from
the usual hard-to-use and often illegible index books, because it has
full names and middle initials that are truncated in those books. It is
most likely taken >from index cards or the documents themselves. >from my
experience so far, it is (randomly) missing about 20% of the names in
the index books. It is still free, but won't be for much longer. We can
fervently hope that more records are posted in the future, or wait for
the NYC Archives to complete their long-awaited index automation
project.

2. The Census Images are part of Ancestry's larger, extremely ambitious
project to make all censuses available on the Web. They are census page
images of not-great, but usable, resolution. So far, the larger (i.e.,
all NYC) counties are not posted; the Ancestry rep I spoke to said they
will be in the next few weeks, though he was a bit skeptical. The site
also mentions that a head-of-household on-line index is being prepared,
which would be great if it actually happens. There is no 1920 index
on-line now, but the Enumeration District descriptions are on-line,
which facilitates searching by address.

Steve Harris
Berkeley, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen room mate or two for UK conv. wanted #general

Gayle Riley <key2pst@...>
 

Non smoker is looking for a room mate or two for the UK conv...reply
privately..room rate 202+USD. a night..will arrive a day or two before
and will leave for Poland a day or so after..Gayle (Female)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Female name: Gisha #general

Ury Link <uryl@...>
 

Dear Genners,
The female name Gisha was nickname to the Hebrew name Tova. The way
is very easy. Tova nickname is normally Gitel or Gutel or Gitta in
Yiddish. Special in Russia the Jews used to called Gitel as Gisel and
Gita as Gisha . My source is the "Beit Shmuel" in his commentary to
the "Shulchan Aruch" and >from "Ohalei Shem" by Solomon Ganzfried,
Ungevar 1878. It is very common in words or names that the T is changed
to a S. the best sample is the Hebrew word Shabat that change in Yiddish
to Shabes.
Best regards
Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Harris Diamond from Blaenclydach, Glamorgan, Wales, Gt Britain #general

Rica Goldberg
 

Dear Genners

Once again I have received a Certificate of Naturalisation, which is not
for my Harris Diamond but someone elses.

It states he was born in Wolkowysk, Grodno, Russia in July 1874 and that
his parents were Archibald and Freda Diamond.

If you are sure that this is someone on your family tree, I will be only
too happy to let you have it.

Rica B Goldberg
Manchester, England

Still researching the following:-
1) KAMINSKY (possibly KAMENSHCHIK) Yanova (Jonava) nr Kovno, Lithuania2)
Nosson Eliazer, Harris, Joseph and Sarah DIAMOND (possibly DIMONT or DIAMONT)
from Kovno, Lithuania; 3) Newman, Emanuel, Rachel & Esther LEVY, Chana &
Yehuda LEV >from KROSNIEWICE in Poland; 4) Isaac & Rebecca COHEN - Poland;
5) Chaim and Rebecca ESTRY - Poland; 6) GOLDBERG (possibly) SCHELENGER in
Yiddish SCHLUZITSIL) Kovno, 7) BERLINSKY >from ????;


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: observation while walking in a Jewish cemetery #general

P. S. WYANT <p.wyant@...>
 

Perhaps this response was posted has already been posted privately to
Mr. Hall, but I understand the custom is said to have originated during
the Exodus. When someone died and was buried into the hard ground of the
Sinai desert, his or her grave was covered with a pile of rocks to
prevent being dug up by wild animals. This original necessity of the
Exodus has been remembered and preserved to the present day by leaving
leaving rocks as a sign of one's presence.

Peter Wyant
Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada


Nissan GOLOSOFF of Perth Amboy, NJ #general

Mel Comisarow <melcom@...>
 

Searching for the family of and the gravestone of Nissan GOLOSOFF (ca.
1850 - ca. 1930) of Perth Amboy, NJ. Nissan G. reputedly financed in
part the 1922 extrication of my father's family >from Ukraine to North
America.

--
Mel Comisarow
melcom@...


Mozheiki #general

Ronald Gold
 

I received a number of suggestions regarding the location of Mozheiki.
Some thought the town was the same as Mazeikiai located in Kovno
guberniya or Mazeikiai/Mozheik and Mazeli both in the Siauliai
district. I have an 1875 revision list with my relatives that show
Mozheiki in the Lida District which includes Eishyshok and Nacha. Judy
Baston found a shtetl located two miles south of Radun, Belarus called
Mozejki which would be in the Lida District. My guess is that Mozejki is
the same as Mozheiki. Again thanks to all who responded.
Ron Gold
Kansas City


Translation of first name 'Gisha' #general

Nancy Maxwell <nancy2727@...>
 

One of my grandfather's half-sisters-in-law was Gisha Padnos
who married Israel Belkin. In the U.S. she went by the name
of Gussie.

Nancy Maxwell in Grapevine, TX


Re: cemetery #austria-czech

Robert Fraser <rgfraser@...>
 

In reference to George Hall noticing small stones on the large stone. The
custom is that when one visits the grave of a deceased person you mark
your visit with a small stone taken >from outside the cemetery.
I visited the Jewish cemetery in Mikulov (formerly Nikolsburg) in the Czech
Republic some months ago, and found one gravestone, that of a former Chief
Rabbi and "wunder-rabbi", almost totally covered in stones. Hundreds of
them. It seemed that several times when jewish weddings had been celebrated
locally, the celebrants visited the grave first to daven and all left
stones.

Robert W Fraser
rgfraser@...