Date   

Re: Lugin #ukraine

SBernst579@...
 

Is it possible that Lugin may Labun, a small village that was levelel by the
Germans.
Labun was just outside of Polonnoye.

Stewart Bernstein
Thousnd Oaks, CA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Lugin #ukraine

SBernst579@...
 

Is it possible that Lugin may Labun, a small village that was levelel by the
Germans.
Labun was just outside of Polonnoye.

Stewart Bernstein
Thousnd Oaks, CA


Trip from Ekaterinoslav to Argentina #ukraine

buenos <buenos@...>
 

Hi:Following the comments >from Laurent Kassel,has anybody idea what was the
normal route used in 1890 to travel >from Ekaterisnolav to Argentina?Was
Odessa port used in any way?Thanking in advance.Joseph Bekinschtein


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Trip from Ekaterinoslav to Argentina #ukraine

buenos <buenos@...>
 

Hi:Following the comments >from Laurent Kassel,has anybody idea what was the
normal route used in 1890 to travel >from Ekaterisnolav to Argentina?Was
Odessa port used in any way?Thanking in advance.Joseph Bekinschtein


Re: Children Use Mother's Maiden Name #general

Aaron Kuperman <akup@...>
 

Until fairly recently (typically the 19th century), no Christian
government recognized a Jewish marriage (or a Christian
marriage). Marriage was traditionally governed by religious law (canon law
or halacha, depending on the individual in question). How individual names
were recorded in official documents is a totally different question.

European Jews generally did not consistently use what we consider to be
"surnames" (family names uniformly reflecting the paternal line) until the
19th century as the earliest. Jews who needed a surname often used the
wife's name if they were (as often occured) living with the wife's family.

Poland did not really exist in 1880. Areas where the Polish langauge was
spoken were divided between Austria (by then Austro-Hungarian Empire, but
everyone knew who was in charge), Russia and Germany. Each country had
different polcies in terms of recording Jewish marriages and legislating
use of surnames among Jews.

Aaron Kuperman

Stanley Winthrop (ak102@freenet.carleton.ca) wrote:
:I have been told that there was a period in Poland arround 1880 when the
:government did not recognize Jewish marriages. As a result the children of
:those marriages who later emigrated were given Polish emigration documents
:with their mothers maiden name as their family name. Is this true? Has
:anyone discovered a situation like this with their family tree?


Re: NYC geography #general

barrychernick@...
 

"And does anyone have the census district for this address? We have
a February 1901 birth there, but the family does not appear in the 1900
indexed census. I thought I might try to find who lived there at the
time."

I looked over some of my old material for 1900 ED's. I believe you are
looking for ED 227 at the north end of Suffolk between Stanton and
Houston Streets . Other ED's to the south, just incase I miss the
address, are 225, 224, 277, 276, 275, 273, and 274. With these ED's and
access to the census records it should be easy to find any address on
Suffolk. My source for 1900 ED's map, available for Manhattan only, is
LDS FHL microfilm number 1033889, Items 5(&4). This same information is
probably available in NYC but I do not know where, Library? City
Archives? NYC Local NARA?

Barry Chernick
Bellevue WA


Part Two re "1900 jobs and salaries in New York" #general

NFatouros@...
 

At least for the time being, this message finishes up my too lengthy
response to Edward Rosenbaum's 11-2 inquiry about 1900 Jobs and salaries
in New York.

Bits and pieces of information about wages and costs of living can be
gleaned >from various paragraphs of Irving Howe's "World of Our Fathers,"
and >from many other accounts of the Lower East Side. Howe talks about the
1902 rise in meat costs made by wholesale butchers, which injured Jewish
retailers. Angry women loosely organized as the "Ladies Anti-Beef Trust
Association" rioted because kosher meat had risen to 17 or 18 cents a
pound. When the wholesalers gave in, the meat retailers failed to reduce
their own prices which the housewives refused to pay. Howe also writes
that in 1904, there was a rent strike, and in that same year, girls went
on strike against a paper box factory which had cut by 10% cut their wages
of $3.00 per thousand cigarette boxes.

Howe also says that during the years between 1913 and 1920, prices
for food and housing rose hugely: food by 199 per cent, shelter by 58 per
cent, clothing by 116 per cent, fuel by 68 per cent, and so on. In this
period Lower East Side women as well as poor women in other cities made
concerted protests against the sharp rise in food and other prices. People
complained they could not manage when potatoes were 7 cents a pound;
bread, 6 cents; cabbage, 20 cents; and onions 18 cents.

Elizabeth Ewen, in "Immigrant Women in the Land of Dollars," cites the
1906 Report of the Mayor's 1906 Pushcart Commission as well as the US
Peddling Commission of Greater New York, neither of which I've read. A
propos of the 6 cent per pound for sugar (see above) Ewen quotes a Lower
East Side shoemaker who complained that a certain grocer charged 8 cents
per pound!

Fictional accounts, like those of Anna Yezierska, are also useful
sources of information. In one story, Yezierska writes that a fish
peddlar demanded 14 and then 15 cents per pound for a large carp, for
which a haggling woman customer ultimately paid 13 cents per pound. I
have read elsewhere that a fellow seeking work upon his arrival agreed
to take a job in the garment industry only to find that he would have to
pay $5.00 to learn how to perform his task. This practice was
corroborated by Gerald Sorin's "The Prophetic Minority" in which the
author mentions, with a cite to a personal interview, that for his new job
in a knee pants shop one immigrant paid a foreman $10 to work for nothing
for two weeks but, contrary to the agreement, a third week of free work
was exacted.

Probably the best sources for statistics of the sort in which Mr.
Rosenbaum, I and other Jewishgenners would be interested are a US
Government 1900 Bureau of Labor Statistics, like the 18th Annual Labor
Commissioner's Report cited above, or some New York City offical report.
I haven't yet tried to find any such sources at I.U.'s Library department
for government documents, but I have found there other types of
government reports and documents, some of which are more than a century
old. These can be retrieved on request >from the Library's archival
depository,and the few that I have examined require delicate handling
because the pages have turned so brittle. I've had to hold my breath
while reading some of these texts lest I blow away a broken fragment of
the pages.

While re-reading the other day an old letter written to me by my
mother, I was reminded that my birth during the Depression had been
largely paid for by my father's mother, Esther. Despite her husband's
probably low wages in the early 20th century Esther and Nathan evidently
saved up something for their old age and could also afford to help out
their architect son for whom there was little work during the 1930's!

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Children Use Mother's Maiden Name #general

Aaron Kuperman <akup@...>
 

Until fairly recently (typically the 19th century), no Christian
government recognized a Jewish marriage (or a Christian
marriage). Marriage was traditionally governed by religious law (canon law
or halacha, depending on the individual in question). How individual names
were recorded in official documents is a totally different question.

European Jews generally did not consistently use what we consider to be
"surnames" (family names uniformly reflecting the paternal line) until the
19th century as the earliest. Jews who needed a surname often used the
wife's name if they were (as often occured) living with the wife's family.

Poland did not really exist in 1880. Areas where the Polish langauge was
spoken were divided between Austria (by then Austro-Hungarian Empire, but
everyone knew who was in charge), Russia and Germany. Each country had
different polcies in terms of recording Jewish marriages and legislating
use of surnames among Jews.

Aaron Kuperman

Stanley Winthrop (ak102@freenet.carleton.ca) wrote:
:I have been told that there was a period in Poland arround 1880 when the
:government did not recognize Jewish marriages. As a result the children of
:those marriages who later emigrated were given Polish emigration documents
:with their mothers maiden name as their family name. Is this true? Has
:anyone discovered a situation like this with their family tree?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NYC geography #general

barrychernick@...
 

"And does anyone have the census district for this address? We have
a February 1901 birth there, but the family does not appear in the 1900
indexed census. I thought I might try to find who lived there at the
time."

I looked over some of my old material for 1900 ED's. I believe you are
looking for ED 227 at the north end of Suffolk between Stanton and
Houston Streets . Other ED's to the south, just incase I miss the
address, are 225, 224, 277, 276, 275, 273, and 274. With these ED's and
access to the census records it should be easy to find any address on
Suffolk. My source for 1900 ED's map, available for Manhattan only, is
LDS FHL microfilm number 1033889, Items 5(&4). This same information is
probably available in NYC but I do not know where, Library? City
Archives? NYC Local NARA?

Barry Chernick
Bellevue WA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Part Two re "1900 jobs and salaries in New York" #general

NFatouros@...
 

At least for the time being, this message finishes up my too lengthy
response to Edward Rosenbaum's 11-2 inquiry about 1900 Jobs and salaries
in New York.

Bits and pieces of information about wages and costs of living can be
gleaned >from various paragraphs of Irving Howe's "World of Our Fathers,"
and >from many other accounts of the Lower East Side. Howe talks about the
1902 rise in meat costs made by wholesale butchers, which injured Jewish
retailers. Angry women loosely organized as the "Ladies Anti-Beef Trust
Association" rioted because kosher meat had risen to 17 or 18 cents a
pound. When the wholesalers gave in, the meat retailers failed to reduce
their own prices which the housewives refused to pay. Howe also writes
that in 1904, there was a rent strike, and in that same year, girls went
on strike against a paper box factory which had cut by 10% cut their wages
of $3.00 per thousand cigarette boxes.

Howe also says that during the years between 1913 and 1920, prices
for food and housing rose hugely: food by 199 per cent, shelter by 58 per
cent, clothing by 116 per cent, fuel by 68 per cent, and so on. In this
period Lower East Side women as well as poor women in other cities made
concerted protests against the sharp rise in food and other prices. People
complained they could not manage when potatoes were 7 cents a pound;
bread, 6 cents; cabbage, 20 cents; and onions 18 cents.

Elizabeth Ewen, in "Immigrant Women in the Land of Dollars," cites the
1906 Report of the Mayor's 1906 Pushcart Commission as well as the US
Peddling Commission of Greater New York, neither of which I've read. A
propos of the 6 cent per pound for sugar (see above) Ewen quotes a Lower
East Side shoemaker who complained that a certain grocer charged 8 cents
per pound!

Fictional accounts, like those of Anna Yezierska, are also useful
sources of information. In one story, Yezierska writes that a fish
peddlar demanded 14 and then 15 cents per pound for a large carp, for
which a haggling woman customer ultimately paid 13 cents per pound. I
have read elsewhere that a fellow seeking work upon his arrival agreed
to take a job in the garment industry only to find that he would have to
pay $5.00 to learn how to perform his task. This practice was
corroborated by Gerald Sorin's "The Prophetic Minority" in which the
author mentions, with a cite to a personal interview, that for his new job
in a knee pants shop one immigrant paid a foreman $10 to work for nothing
for two weeks but, contrary to the agreement, a third week of free work
was exacted.

Probably the best sources for statistics of the sort in which Mr.
Rosenbaum, I and other Jewishgenners would be interested are a US
Government 1900 Bureau of Labor Statistics, like the 18th Annual Labor
Commissioner's Report cited above, or some New York City offical report.
I haven't yet tried to find any such sources at I.U.'s Library department
for government documents, but I have found there other types of
government reports and documents, some of which are more than a century
old. These can be retrieved on request >from the Library's archival
depository,and the few that I have examined require delicate handling
because the pages have turned so brittle. I've had to hold my breath
while reading some of these texts lest I blow away a broken fragment of
the pages.

While re-reading the other day an old letter written to me by my
mother, I was reminded that my birth during the Depression had been
largely paid for by my father's mother, Esther. Despite her husband's
probably low wages in the early 20th century Esther and Nathan evidently
saved up something for their old age and could also afford to help out
their architect son for whom there was little work during the 1930's!

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol.


Re: BRISK from Brisk-Litovsk/Saffed/Egypt/England/Singapore #general

Leslie Reich <LReich@...>
 

Wendy Dawer posted:
searching out any information regarding BRISK family - earliest known
member Morris BRISK, dob circa 1830 in Brest. Family belonged to hassidic
sect headed by Rabbi Soloveichik. In early 1800s, a branch of the family
moved to Saffed, and then on to Egypt. There were 3 brothers, one
remained in Egypt, one went to Singapore and the 3rd went to Manchester,
England in 1896. All 3 were in the textile business.
Cyndee Mestel commented:
" Major problem in your quest -- the Soloveichik family were not and are
not hassidic -- they were and are prominent and influential *non*-hassidic
rabbinic leaders. "

To this I would like to add two points.

a) Living in Manchester, I can confirm (>from ancient memory) that there
used to be a large textile company here (possibly in Whitworth St) called
M.Brisk Ltd

b) Re. the 'hassidic' member of the Soloveichik family. I am a sort of
mechutan to this distinguished clan.(My sister-in-law's sister is married
to the family's current head). Cyndee is indeed correct in asserting that
they are non-hassidic and no mention of such a connection is made in the
Hebrew biography of the family's progenitor, the Bais Halevi.

Nevertheless, there are rumours/rumors that one family prominent member
became a Hassidic rabbi. This is something I have never bothered to check
out.

Leslie Reich, Manchester


Tulchiner Cemetery in Philadelphia #general

zerakodesh@...
 

Hello
Is there anyone keeping records of the old Tulchiner Cemetery in
Philadelphia? Who would be able to advise me on this? Does any one still
visit this cemetery?
Thank you.
Esther Feinstein Sackheim
ZeraKodesh@aol.com


Re: London - Looking for a Burial Place - Thanks #general

robert.gleek <robert.gleek@...>
 

Yaacov,
I am so pleased that the information that I and others passed on was useful
and that you found the stone for the person you were looking for...
I should like to add that of all the cemeteries I have visited over the
last ten years, in my quest for information etc, the people at Edmonton
Federation have been the most helpful and patient.

The cemetery itself is a capsule >from history - some historic graves and
some beautifully sculptured stones. It is such a shame that vandals have
broken in over recent months causing untold damage, but if it is any
consolation I spoke with the chaps there who believe it is more likely to
be children than anti-semitic thugs, due to a lack of daubings etc.
Not that that makes things right of course...
Good Luck in your quest,
Daniel Gleek

Yaacov Slizak <yslizak@eircom.nospam.net> wrote:
I'd like to thank to all the good people who answered my question about
London Cemeteries:
[snip]
I found my gggrandfather's burial site at Edmonton's Cemetery, which I'll
visit in my next trip to London in two weeks time. [snip]


GULLAN - Baltimore before 1980 #general

Jules Feldman
 

My grandmother Malka HURWITZ had a cousin in Baltimore by the name of
Nathan Gullan. Both the HURWITZ and the GULLAN families were from
Rokiskis, Lithuania.
Contact was lost in the early 1960s.
A search of the SSDI reveals dates of death for Nathan and his wife
Nettie.

Nathan GULLAN
b 25 Jan 1894
d Oct 1980
SSN 212-32-3772
issued: Maryland
Last Residence : Baltimore City, Md
Last Benefit : Baltimore City, Md

Nettie Gullan
b 20 Feb 1902
d Aug 1986
SSN 218-74-2333
issued: Maryland
Last Residence : Philadelphia, PA
Last Benefit : (none specified)

We know that Nathan and Nettie had 2 daughters Anne and Irene and a son,
first name unknown. If these names ring a bell please contact me.

Thanks,
Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel
Jules Feldman <jfeldman@yizrael.org.il>


Yiddish Translation-ViewMate #general

ADAM1GS@...
 

Have posted the image of the back of a postal card written in Yiddish
script on View Mate, VM 127, that was written by my aunt sometime in the
1930's. This is the only document that I have of her and I would truly
appreciate someone's help in translating the card.

Fred Klein
N. Falmouth, MA

Researching: YEZERSKI - Vilna, Bialystok, US
KREPEL/COHEN - Syedlitz, US
KORT - Vilna, ???
SHERESHNIEWSKI - Vilna, ???
KARELSKI - Vilna, US


Re: HOLLANDERSKI and Polish Jews in Paris #general

Lifshitz-Krams Anne
 

I am sorry, I missed the first mail about this question, and maybe my
answer is not pertinent.
1- Concerning the Hollanderskis in Paris, at least 2 of them have been
naturalized during the 19th century :
Leon, has been naturalized in March 14, 1871, he was in Paris since 1843
David has been naturalized December 23, 1899, he was born in Paris, but his
father Ephraïm was born in Suwalki and married in Paris in 1859.
I can give more informations about them privately.
2- About the Jews >from Suwalki in Paris: Paris has always been a great
center for Jewish migrations >from Eastern Europe. Some of them just stayed
some times and went farther (to USA), some settled down.
16.5% of the foreign Jews who married in Paris in 1848-1857 were born in
Poland or Russia, they were 29 % in 1868-72, 57% in 1895-1897.
Of the 1200 Jews naturalized 1815-1900 I studied, 260 were born in
Poland/Russia. 10 arrived in France before 1830, 30 in1830-1847, 45 between
1848 and 1869, 48 between 1870 and 1879 and 127 in 1880-88.
According to Michel Roblin ("Les Juifs de Paris: Demographie, economie,
culture", Paris, A et J. Picard, 1952), there was 4,000 Russian Jews in
Paris in 1880-1901 and 10,000 in 1901-1914.
A lot of books have been written about this Russian/Polish migration to
France.
Anne Lifshitz-Krams
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, Paris
http://www.genealoj.org

From: Burton Schreiber <schreibb@worldnet.att.net>

In the Lomza periodical a few months ago, there was a list of people from
Suwalki who were married in Paris, France, that is.
I wonder whether Paris was the place to go to marry, if you had enough
money. The list was quite long.


Searching Albert SILBERFELD #general

Alan Ehrlich <alan.ehrlich@...>
 

Can anybody in JewishGen give me Albert Silberfeld's current e-mail
address.
The one I have bounces.

Thank you

Alan Ehrlich
Geneva, Switzerland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: BRISK from Brisk-Litovsk/Saffed/Egypt/England/Singapore #general

Leslie Reich <LReich@...>
 

Wendy Dawer posted:
searching out any information regarding BRISK family - earliest known
member Morris BRISK, dob circa 1830 in Brest. Family belonged to hassidic
sect headed by Rabbi Soloveichik. In early 1800s, a branch of the family
moved to Saffed, and then on to Egypt. There were 3 brothers, one
remained in Egypt, one went to Singapore and the 3rd went to Manchester,
England in 1896. All 3 were in the textile business.
Cyndee Mestel commented:
" Major problem in your quest -- the Soloveichik family were not and are
not hassidic -- they were and are prominent and influential *non*-hassidic
rabbinic leaders. "

To this I would like to add two points.

a) Living in Manchester, I can confirm (>from ancient memory) that there
used to be a large textile company here (possibly in Whitworth St) called
M.Brisk Ltd

b) Re. the 'hassidic' member of the Soloveichik family. I am a sort of
mechutan to this distinguished clan.(My sister-in-law's sister is married
to the family's current head). Cyndee is indeed correct in asserting that
they are non-hassidic and no mention of such a connection is made in the
Hebrew biography of the family's progenitor, the Bais Halevi.

Nevertheless, there are rumours/rumors that one family prominent member
became a Hassidic rabbi. This is something I have never bothered to check
out.

Leslie Reich, Manchester


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tulchiner Cemetery in Philadelphia #general

zerakodesh@...
 

Hello
Is there anyone keeping records of the old Tulchiner Cemetery in
Philadelphia? Who would be able to advise me on this? Does any one still
visit this cemetery?
Thank you.
Esther Feinstein Sackheim
ZeraKodesh@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: London - Looking for a Burial Place - Thanks #general

robert.gleek <robert.gleek@...>
 

Yaacov,
I am so pleased that the information that I and others passed on was useful
and that you found the stone for the person you were looking for...
I should like to add that of all the cemeteries I have visited over the
last ten years, in my quest for information etc, the people at Edmonton
Federation have been the most helpful and patient.

The cemetery itself is a capsule >from history - some historic graves and
some beautifully sculptured stones. It is such a shame that vandals have
broken in over recent months causing untold damage, but if it is any
consolation I spoke with the chaps there who believe it is more likely to
be children than anti-semitic thugs, due to a lack of daubings etc.
Not that that makes things right of course...
Good Luck in your quest,
Daniel Gleek

Yaacov Slizak <yslizak@eircom.nospam.net> wrote:
I'd like to thank to all the good people who answered my question about
London Cemeteries:
[snip]
I found my gggrandfather's burial site at Edmonton's Cemetery, which I'll
visit in my next trip to London in two weeks time. [snip]