Date   

Copyright Laws Summary #general

suprlmn@...
 

Thank you all for your help, support, advice, etc. on the subject of
copyright laws. Those who wrote to me privately have been answered
privately. Following is a brief summary of the remarks:
1. All personal works and compilations can be copyrighted. The person
could sue you until he's 'blue in the face' but would have to prove to a
court that you profitted in some monetary way by publishing his data in
order to collect any damages.
2. Your relative does not own the public records which provided data.
3. A copyright proclaims your ownership of the form [the wording for
example] in which you put your data, not the data itself.
4. There is no copyright in "facts, news, ideas or information. Copyright
exists in the form in which information is expressed and the selection and
arrangement of the material, all of which involves skill and labour."
Source: McNae's Essential Law for Journalists by Tom Welsh and Walter
Greenwood, published by Butterworths.
5. Copyright law protects an author's work in the creative expression
of his ideas. It does not cover facts. It also only covers the author's
original work. If you gave this strange person some information, you still
have rights in that information, to use it as you see fit.
6. Family history belongs to all the family -- it is not a 'created' work
as such (to be copyrightable I believe it has to be something created and
not in existence anywhere else)...snip... Jeez, and I thought my family
was bad.
B'shalom,
Susan Pearlman, Northridge, California
Researching [inter alia]:
JASKOLKA, JELIN [YELLIN], JOSZPA [YOSHPE], KOSLOVSKY [KOZLOWSKI],
RUBENSTEIN, SIDRANSKY, SZOR [SHORE], SZEJNMAN [SCHEINMAN], and what started
all this: WISHNIATSKY.


Warszawa in the years 1850 #general

Mendelssohn <mendelssohn@...>
 

Dear Genners,
I would like to find books relating the life in Warszawa in the years
1850..(the addresses of my Mendelssohn ancestors are given only by numbers:
2929,2930 in a part of the city named "new world", 10th ardt of
Warszawa.What does it mean?)
Thanks in advance!
Florence Mendelssohn (Paris),France

MENDELSSOHN(russian Poland 19th),RUBINSTEIN (Kharkov;St-Petersburg),
SZULCMAN (Schultzman),PRENTKA, KAHN, DUTLINGER (Poland),BRANDON
(Holland and France).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Copyright Laws Summary #general

suprlmn@...
 

Thank you all for your help, support, advice, etc. on the subject of
copyright laws. Those who wrote to me privately have been answered
privately. Following is a brief summary of the remarks:
1. All personal works and compilations can be copyrighted. The person
could sue you until he's 'blue in the face' but would have to prove to a
court that you profitted in some monetary way by publishing his data in
order to collect any damages.
2. Your relative does not own the public records which provided data.
3. A copyright proclaims your ownership of the form [the wording for
example] in which you put your data, not the data itself.
4. There is no copyright in "facts, news, ideas or information. Copyright
exists in the form in which information is expressed and the selection and
arrangement of the material, all of which involves skill and labour."
Source: McNae's Essential Law for Journalists by Tom Welsh and Walter
Greenwood, published by Butterworths.
5. Copyright law protects an author's work in the creative expression
of his ideas. It does not cover facts. It also only covers the author's
original work. If you gave this strange person some information, you still
have rights in that information, to use it as you see fit.
6. Family history belongs to all the family -- it is not a 'created' work
as such (to be copyrightable I believe it has to be something created and
not in existence anywhere else)...snip... Jeez, and I thought my family
was bad.
B'shalom,
Susan Pearlman, Northridge, California
Researching [inter alia]:
JASKOLKA, JELIN [YELLIN], JOSZPA [YOSHPE], KOSLOVSKY [KOZLOWSKI],
RUBENSTEIN, SIDRANSKY, SZOR [SHORE], SZEJNMAN [SCHEINMAN], and what started
all this: WISHNIATSKY.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Warszawa in the years 1850 #general

Mendelssohn <mendelssohn@...>
 

Dear Genners,
I would like to find books relating the life in Warszawa in the years
1850..(the addresses of my Mendelssohn ancestors are given only by numbers:
2929,2930 in a part of the city named "new world", 10th ardt of
Warszawa.What does it mean?)
Thanks in advance!
Florence Mendelssohn (Paris),France

MENDELSSOHN(russian Poland 19th),RUBINSTEIN (Kharkov;St-Petersburg),
SZULCMAN (Schultzman),PRENTKA, KAHN, DUTLINGER (Poland),BRANDON
(Holland and France).


LEVITT Surname from Lith. to South Africa, USA #general

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

Posting for a friend who does not have access to JewishGen - His father,
Simon LEVITT left >from Ritavas, Lithuania, bound for Johannesburg, South
Africa in 1900 with his father, Notte (Nathan), and his younger sister,
Lily. Two older brothers, Ben Zion and Barnett had already settled in
South Africa.

About ten years earlier, two older sisters had come to the US. He does
not know where they settled, but he is hoping that some of this might be
familiar to someone. He is now living in Foster City, CA.
Unfortunately, he does not know the names of his aunts who came to the
US. Can anyone out in 'genland help out?

Chuck Weinstein in San Mateo, CA
cweinstein@jewishgen.org


Re: Palestinian Jews #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Has anyone ever read any accounts of people who are Jewish according
to Halacha who are Palestinians* (or other Arabs) because their mothers
were Jews?

I have been in touch with one such individual whose mother's mother
married an Arab many years ago and lived in an Arab town. I think
this is a very interesting subject. I think I read somewhere that
there is a clan of Palestinians on the West Bank who claim Jewish
ancestry.

David Goldman

David's question is indeed an interesting one, because Jewish law (quite
anomalously and for insufficiently researched historical reasons) defines
Jewishness matrilineally while Islamic law (more normally for patriarchal
cultures, including European ones in earlier times) defines it
patrilineally. Consequently, as a matter of Islamic and Jewish law
respectively, the child of an Arab father and a Jewish mother will
automatically be perceived as an Arab and by the father and his family
(and, by Islamic law, as a Muslim, if that is the father's religion -- some
Arabs are Christians, of course) and will automatically qualify as a Jew
by Jewish law! This gives the child a theoretical choice when he or she
grows up.

However, in real life, such marriages normally resulted in the couple
settling down in the father's home town or village, so the child was
normally raised as a Muslim (or Christian if that was the father's faith)
and either way the likelihood of his or her choosing later on to become a
Jew is rather remote. (I'm not saying it never happens, of course.) And
certainly as a matter of Jewish law, it is possible, provided that the
individual can prove that the Jewish ethnicity (or orthodox conversion) of
his mother.

A marriage between a Jewish man and a Muslim woman would be far less likely
to occur -- because her family would not countenance it and Arab girls were
and are traditionally far more under the control of their families than
were Jewish girls >from secular families. But the child of such a marriage
would not be considered a Jew unless he or she converted to Judaism (or
unless the mother had converted before conception of the child).

Judith Romney Wegner

*It is worth noting that before 1948, virtually the only people who
actually defined themselves as "Palestinian" were Jews residing in that
country, who had been issued Palestinian passports by the British Mandate
authorities! (I have seen more than one such passport.) An Arab resident
back then would have been equally entitled to such a passport, but
proportionately fewerArabs than Jews living in Palestine travelled abroad;
and culturally speaking, it was not routine for any Arab to define himself
as a Palestinian back then, even if for convenience he had acquired a
Palestinian passport >from the mandate authorities.)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen LEVITT Surname from Lith. to South Africa, USA #general

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

Posting for a friend who does not have access to JewishGen - His father,
Simon LEVITT left >from Ritavas, Lithuania, bound for Johannesburg, South
Africa in 1900 with his father, Notte (Nathan), and his younger sister,
Lily. Two older brothers, Ben Zion and Barnett had already settled in
South Africa.

About ten years earlier, two older sisters had come to the US. He does
not know where they settled, but he is hoping that some of this might be
familiar to someone. He is now living in Foster City, CA.
Unfortunately, he does not know the names of his aunts who came to the
US. Can anyone out in 'genland help out?

Chuck Weinstein in San Mateo, CA
cweinstein@jewishgen.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Palestinian Jews #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Has anyone ever read any accounts of people who are Jewish according
to Halacha who are Palestinians* (or other Arabs) because their mothers
were Jews?

I have been in touch with one such individual whose mother's mother
married an Arab many years ago and lived in an Arab town. I think
this is a very interesting subject. I think I read somewhere that
there is a clan of Palestinians on the West Bank who claim Jewish
ancestry.

David Goldman

David's question is indeed an interesting one, because Jewish law (quite
anomalously and for insufficiently researched historical reasons) defines
Jewishness matrilineally while Islamic law (more normally for patriarchal
cultures, including European ones in earlier times) defines it
patrilineally. Consequently, as a matter of Islamic and Jewish law
respectively, the child of an Arab father and a Jewish mother will
automatically be perceived as an Arab and by the father and his family
(and, by Islamic law, as a Muslim, if that is the father's religion -- some
Arabs are Christians, of course) and will automatically qualify as a Jew
by Jewish law! This gives the child a theoretical choice when he or she
grows up.

However, in real life, such marriages normally resulted in the couple
settling down in the father's home town or village, so the child was
normally raised as a Muslim (or Christian if that was the father's faith)
and either way the likelihood of his or her choosing later on to become a
Jew is rather remote. (I'm not saying it never happens, of course.) And
certainly as a matter of Jewish law, it is possible, provided that the
individual can prove that the Jewish ethnicity (or orthodox conversion) of
his mother.

A marriage between a Jewish man and a Muslim woman would be far less likely
to occur -- because her family would not countenance it and Arab girls were
and are traditionally far more under the control of their families than
were Jewish girls >from secular families. But the child of such a marriage
would not be considered a Jew unless he or she converted to Judaism (or
unless the mother had converted before conception of the child).

Judith Romney Wegner

*It is worth noting that before 1948, virtually the only people who
actually defined themselves as "Palestinian" were Jews residing in that
country, who had been issued Palestinian passports by the British Mandate
authorities! (I have seen more than one such passport.) An Arab resident
back then would have been equally entitled to such a passport, but
proportionately fewerArabs than Jews living in Palestine travelled abroad;
and culturally speaking, it was not routine for any Arab to define himself
as a Palestinian back then, even if for convenience he had acquired a
Palestinian passport >from the mandate authorities.)


Usenet Genealogy Archives Searchpage #general

genea_search@...
 

Dear genealogy friends

Almost every message that is posted to a newsgroup on the internet is
archived in the databases at deja.com. This international source of
information (made up by you, me and the rest of the world in any
possible language) can be consulted via their searchmechanism. To make
it even more simple I created a free and non-commercial, pre-programmed
usenet search facility for the deja.com (genealogy)archives. Specially
tuned for fast and easy (re)search in 64 genealogy newsgroups >from all
over the world, abt. 410000 postings are searched within seconds. Its
also possible to refine your search by country, topic or newsgroup or
use the Author Profile Search

You can find the site at:
http://www.kuijsten.net/usenet_search/genealogy.html

Suggestion: Search for surnames, locations, or e-mail addresses. It
can be useful to find out this way if someone else was looking for the
same data as you.

There is also an option to search for keys in last years postings in
all 45.0000 ! discussion forums at deja (abt. 180000000 postings!)
Maybe you can find some useful information >from the past, reread all
your usenet postings, or just review that ludicrous flame...

It's just a simple tool, Sometimes the results are a bit foggy, but
always better then nothing. Enjoy yourself with the usenet genealogy
archives searchpage!!

Regards, Rob Kuijsten,
Culemborg, Netherlands


Molodechno #general

Alter & Dina Ophir <alterdina@...>
 

In my research I have come across a family document that identifies
Moldetzne, Lithuania as the place of origin of my mother's family. I am
looking for someone to verify the correctness of this spelling. If this
cannot be verified, can someone suggest shtetles with similar names in or
near Lithuania. The document refers to an event (a pogrom) that took
place on or around 1900.

Molodechno is in Belarrus in the region of Minsk.
Alter Ophir
alterdina@ashdot-a.org.il


VM131: Hebrew names #general

Howard Cherney <hcherney@...>
 

Viewmate file: VM131

Can anyone please read the Hebrew on this tombstone and interpret the
Hebrew names inscribed for Mollie Fireberg. She was also called Matilda
and her surename was spelled, Faerberg.

Please reply to me or, <Ida Cherney> january@bc.seflin.org
Howard Cherney


Re: REBECCHI: what dou you think about this surname? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Dalia Rossi wrote:

I found in old book of byblical hebrew that in old hebrew
Rebach,reibach,rebech means lightening
**the normal Hebrew word for lightning is baraq (spelled bet-resh-qof).

and in middle hebrew means earnings,like in yiddish reibach,rebbach
ecc,ecc means earnings.
**The Hebrew word revah, meaning earnings or profit, is spelled
completely differently
(resh-vav-het) -- and has no connection with the noun bet-resh-qof
meaning lightning.

In Poland rybicki is relative to Ryba that means fish,
**As it happens, Fisch, Fischmann and Fischer are very common
German/Yiddish surnames. So that is certainly a possibility. Also, a
common Jewish-Polish surname is Ravitsky; you might want to investigate
that possibility also.

All of the above assumes that your ancestors were Ashkenazim. But if they
were sephardim maybe you should be looking for Spanish or Portuguese origin
for the name Rebecchi. Or perhaps, as you first suggested, the name is
related to Rebecca ( Rivqah)

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: Ships from E. Europe to England #general

Harry Dodsworth <af877@...>
 

Sharon Kleban <s_kleban@yahoo.com> posted:
My ggm >from Russia arrived in the US in 1905 on a ship
from Southampton. Does anyone out there know how to
find information on ships >from E. Europe to England
during that era?
If by information, Sharon means passenger lists, there aren't
any. My understanding is that on the short sea routes, the British
destroyed them after two weeks. The ships themselves are well
documented but that isn't much help.
However I also understand that >from 1890, the British kept
outbound passenger lists and these are in the Public Record Office
at Kew. In general they give ages, nationality and possibly occupation.
In some cases, for transit passengers, they list the ship the
passenger entered Britain on.
These lists have not been filmed, are generally not indexed, are
fragile, and are kept in dusty boxes. So a professional researcher
who knows these records is needed and the potential reward is limited.

There is about one chance in three that an emigrant left through
Hamburg; the Hamburg exit lists are available and there is a project
under way to transcribe them and put them online (although there
may be a charge when the project is complete) so perhaps these
should be checked before any attempt is made to check British records.
Emigrants travelling through Britain were known as Hamburg indirect
emigrants.

--
Harry Dodsworth Ottawa Ontario Canada af877@freenet.carleton.ca


Re: Mashe #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Masha is a Slavic woman's name.

Sally Bruckheimer
Buffalo, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Usenet Genealogy Archives Searchpage #general

genea_search@...
 

Dear genealogy friends

Almost every message that is posted to a newsgroup on the internet is
archived in the databases at deja.com. This international source of
information (made up by you, me and the rest of the world in any
possible language) can be consulted via their searchmechanism. To make
it even more simple I created a free and non-commercial, pre-programmed
usenet search facility for the deja.com (genealogy)archives. Specially
tuned for fast and easy (re)search in 64 genealogy newsgroups >from all
over the world, abt. 410000 postings are searched within seconds. Its
also possible to refine your search by country, topic or newsgroup or
use the Author Profile Search

You can find the site at:
http://www.kuijsten.net/usenet_search/genealogy.html

Suggestion: Search for surnames, locations, or e-mail addresses. It
can be useful to find out this way if someone else was looking for the
same data as you.

There is also an option to search for keys in last years postings in
all 45.0000 ! discussion forums at deja (abt. 180000000 postings!)
Maybe you can find some useful information >from the past, reread all
your usenet postings, or just review that ludicrous flame...

It's just a simple tool, Sometimes the results are a bit foggy, but
always better then nothing. Enjoy yourself with the usenet genealogy
archives searchpage!!

Regards, Rob Kuijsten,
Culemborg, Netherlands


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Molodechno #general

Alter & Dina Ophir <alterdina@...>
 

In my research I have come across a family document that identifies
Moldetzne, Lithuania as the place of origin of my mother's family. I am
looking for someone to verify the correctness of this spelling. If this
cannot be verified, can someone suggest shtetles with similar names in or
near Lithuania. The document refers to an event (a pogrom) that took
place on or around 1900.

Molodechno is in Belarrus in the region of Minsk.
Alter Ophir
alterdina@ashdot-a.org.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen VM131: Hebrew names #general

Howard Cherney <hcherney@...>
 

Viewmate file: VM131

Can anyone please read the Hebrew on this tombstone and interpret the
Hebrew names inscribed for Mollie Fireberg. She was also called Matilda
and her surename was spelled, Faerberg.

Please reply to me or, <Ida Cherney> january@bc.seflin.org
Howard Cherney


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: REBECCHI: what dou you think about this surname? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Dalia Rossi wrote:

I found in old book of byblical hebrew that in old hebrew
Rebach,reibach,rebech means lightening
**the normal Hebrew word for lightning is baraq (spelled bet-resh-qof).

and in middle hebrew means earnings,like in yiddish reibach,rebbach
ecc,ecc means earnings.
**The Hebrew word revah, meaning earnings or profit, is spelled
completely differently
(resh-vav-het) -- and has no connection with the noun bet-resh-qof
meaning lightning.

In Poland rybicki is relative to Ryba that means fish,
**As it happens, Fisch, Fischmann and Fischer are very common
German/Yiddish surnames. So that is certainly a possibility. Also, a
common Jewish-Polish surname is Ravitsky; you might want to investigate
that possibility also.

All of the above assumes that your ancestors were Ashkenazim. But if they
were sephardim maybe you should be looking for Spanish or Portuguese origin
for the name Rebecchi. Or perhaps, as you first suggested, the name is
related to Rebecca ( Rivqah)

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ships from E. Europe to England #general

Harry Dodsworth <af877@...>
 

Sharon Kleban <s_kleban@yahoo.com> posted:
My ggm >from Russia arrived in the US in 1905 on a ship
from Southampton. Does anyone out there know how to
find information on ships >from E. Europe to England
during that era?
If by information, Sharon means passenger lists, there aren't
any. My understanding is that on the short sea routes, the British
destroyed them after two weeks. The ships themselves are well
documented but that isn't much help.
However I also understand that >from 1890, the British kept
outbound passenger lists and these are in the Public Record Office
at Kew. In general they give ages, nationality and possibly occupation.
In some cases, for transit passengers, they list the ship the
passenger entered Britain on.
These lists have not been filmed, are generally not indexed, are
fragile, and are kept in dusty boxes. So a professional researcher
who knows these records is needed and the potential reward is limited.

There is about one chance in three that an emigrant left through
Hamburg; the Hamburg exit lists are available and there is a project
under way to transcribe them and put them online (although there
may be a charge when the project is complete) so perhaps these
should be checked before any attempt is made to check British records.
Emigrants travelling through Britain were known as Hamburg indirect
emigrants.

--
Harry Dodsworth Ottawa Ontario Canada af877@freenet.carleton.ca


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Mashe #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Masha is a Slavic woman's name.

Sally Bruckheimer
Buffalo, NY