Date   

Re: Name Changes #general

lenwrite <lenwrite@...>
 

I have been a subscriber to JewishGen for more than two years, and Ukrainian
SIG since its inception. During that time I have witnessed posting after
posting dealing with the name issue, and none that I can recall have been
correct.

Neither the ship's purser nor immigration officials ever altered an
immigrant's name. It should come as no surprise that the guilty culprits
were embassy and emigration officials in the home country.

My father told me a story how officials at Ellis Island could not spell my
grandfather's patrynomic ZAMACHOFSKY, so they gave him the name of the man
in front of him in line, which was ZUNDER. Quite accidently, the official
closed the "U" and my grandfather always wrote his name "ZONDER."

Some 30 years after my grandfather came to this country, he came to New
Haven to visit his younger brother Jack, once known as Feiga Leo
Zamachofsky.

At the New Haven railroad station my grandfather took a cab giving the cab
driver the name of the store and the address.

"No problem, sir. I know the store well. I'm a customer."

In a few minutes they pulled up in front of the store and my grandfather
took one look at the sign and told the cabbie that it wasn't the right
store. This was ZUNDER'S. He wanted ZONDER'S.

Rather than argue, the cabbie took my grandfather up and down the street (it
was a short one) but to no avail. Search as they might they couldn't find
ZONDER'S. Finally the cabbie convinced my grandfather to go into the store
and ask the people inside (my aunt and uncle) if they knew where ZONDER'S
was. "After all," the cabbie allegedly said, "with names as close as that,
surely they must know of each other.

My grandfather agreed, got out of the cab and entered the store. Spying his
brother, the first word's out of my grandfather's mouth were: "Jack! You
spelled our name wrong."

About six years ago, just after the death of my mother, I was helping my
father clean out some papers and organize others when I spotted a passport.
Opening it up and reading it, I saw that it was my great-grandfather's
passport to leave Russia and travel to the United States. This was in 1909,
three years after my grandfather arrived here.

The passport was written in Russian, which I cannot read, German and French.
I can read the French and with the help of the French was able to fight my
way through the German. They were identical. In short, the passport
contained the ZAMACHOFSKY name, in a flourished script, written by the same
person on all three entries. The name was written by a person well familiar
with Western Latin script. Nowhere was the name written in Cyrillic,
although there was a complete Cyrillic section.

So much for the misapplication of the name ZONDER.

However, the passport opened a Pandora's Box of new mysteries. First, it was
issued (surprise, surprise) by the German Consulate in Odessa. My family was
from Yelisavetgrad, about 200 miles north of Odessa. If the family had come
through that port enroute to the United States, I could make sense of it.
But the family came through Bremenhavn. Odessa was way out of the way. Why?
Also, if they traveled under the name ZAMACHOFSKY, where did the name ZONDER
come from? And where were the passports for my great-grandmother and my
great-uncle Jack?

The last problem was the easiest to solve. Prior to 1923 (?) women and
dependent children traveled under one passport issued to the head of the
family. As Jack was only eight years old, he would have been on that
passport.

I have not completely put the mystery of the "ZONDER" name to rest yet. I
have proved it originated with my grandfather, but not why. I have not been
able to find either ZONDER or ZAMACHOFSKY on any ship's manifest. I only
know he came to America in 1906, three years ahead of the rest of the
family.

As he was only 15, he was "sponsored" by his mother's sister who was already
in New Haven, and apparently living comfortably. She is listed in the city
directory as owning a rooming house.

One possibility is that Aunt Huldah paid for my grandfather's passage on a
Red Star ship out of Antwerp, Belgium (not proven yet), and either told him
or arranged for him to use the name ZUNDER deliberately.

Meier ZUNDER was a Bavarian Jew who had settled in New Haven before 1850 and
had risen in the public esteem to become President of the New Haven Board of
Education. City fathers also named a school after him that still stands but
is no longer used as a school.

His two sons operated an importing-exporting business in the city and
represented several shipping lines, one of which was Red Star. If this
surmise is correct, he was told to use the name to get respect aboard the
ship.

Another possibility is the word "ZONDER" in Dutch (spoken in Holland) means
"without or alone." I believe he was traveling alone and perhaps HIAS or
some other agency bestowed the name on him. (Their are several ZONDERS in
the Detroit area (no relation) that are of Belgian extraction.)

However, I can concoct several other possible reasons for the name ZONDER,
but they are farther afield than the reasons already stated.

The important point herein is that our ancestors traveled with passports.
Ship's personnel only interviewed them for supplementary information
required on the arrival documents handed over to immigration authorities,

As for the different spelling in Lois' relatives papers, remember officials
were translating the name as it sounded. There were no rules as there are
today. Our immigrant ancestors spoke in dialect. Some spoke Litvak, other
Galitziana, or Palish (Polish) or Rushishuh. The differences would amaze
you.
Just the familiar Hebrew word Shabbat can be pronounced Shabess or Shabbos
or Shabbois in Yiddish.

Lenn Zonder
Woodbridge, CT
lenwrite@surfree.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Name Changes #ukraine

lenwrite <lenwrite@...>
 

I have been a subscriber to JewishGen for more than two years, and Ukrainian
SIG since its inception. During that time I have witnessed posting after
posting dealing with the name issue, and none that I can recall have been
correct.

Neither the ship's purser nor immigration officials ever altered an
immigrant's name. It should come as no surprise that the guilty culprits
were embassy and emigration officials in the home country.

My father told me a story how officials at Ellis Island could not spell my
grandfather's patrynomic ZAMACHOFSKY, so they gave him the name of the man
in front of him in line, which was ZUNDER. Quite accidently, the official
closed the "U" and my grandfather always wrote his name "ZONDER."

Some 30 years after my grandfather came to this country, he came to New
Haven to visit his younger brother Jack, once known as Feiga Leo
Zamachofsky.

At the New Haven railroad station my grandfather took a cab giving the cab
driver the name of the store and the address.

"No problem, sir. I know the store well. I'm a customer."

In a few minutes they pulled up in front of the store and my grandfather
took one look at the sign and told the cabbie that it wasn't the right
store. This was ZUNDER'S. He wanted ZONDER'S.

Rather than argue, the cabbie took my grandfather up and down the street (it
was a short one) but to no avail. Search as they might they couldn't find
ZONDER'S. Finally the cabbie convinced my grandfather to go into the store
and ask the people inside (my aunt and uncle) if they knew where ZONDER'S
was. "After all," the cabbie allegedly said, "with names as close as that,
surely they must know of each other.

My grandfather agreed, got out of the cab and entered the store. Spying his
brother, the first word's out of my grandfather's mouth were: "Jack! You
spelled our name wrong."

About six years ago, just after the death of my mother, I was helping my
father clean out some papers and organize others when I spotted a passport.
Opening it up and reading it, I saw that it was my great-grandfather's
passport to leave Russia and travel to the United States. This was in 1909,
three years after my grandfather arrived here.

The passport was written in Russian, which I cannot read, German and French.
I can read the French and with the help of the French was able to fight my
way through the German. They were identical. In short, the passport
contained the ZAMACHOFSKY name, in a flourished script, written by the same
person on all three entries. The name was written by a person well familiar
with Western Latin script. Nowhere was the name written in Cyrillic,
although there was a complete Cyrillic section.

So much for the misapplication of the name ZONDER.

However, the passport opened a Pandora's Box of new mysteries. First, it was
issued (surprise, surprise) by the German Consulate in Odessa. My family was
from Yelisavetgrad, about 200 miles north of Odessa. If the family had come
through that port enroute to the United States, I could make sense of it.
But the family came through Bremenhavn. Odessa was way out of the way. Why?
Also, if they traveled under the name ZAMACHOFSKY, where did the name ZONDER
come from? And where were the passports for my great-grandmother and my
great-uncle Jack?

The last problem was the easiest to solve. Prior to 1923 (?) women and
dependent children traveled under one passport issued to the head of the
family. As Jack was only eight years old, he would have been on that
passport.

I have not completely put the mystery of the "ZONDER" name to rest yet. I
have proved it originated with my grandfather, but not why. I have not been
able to find either ZONDER or ZAMACHOFSKY on any ship's manifest. I only
know he came to America in 1906, three years ahead of the rest of the
family.

As he was only 15, he was "sponsored" by his mother's sister who was already
in New Haven, and apparently living comfortably. She is listed in the city
directory as owning a rooming house.

One possibility is that Aunt Huldah paid for my grandfather's passage on a
Red Star ship out of Antwerp, Belgium (not proven yet), and either told him
or arranged for him to use the name ZUNDER deliberately.

Meier ZUNDER was a Bavarian Jew who had settled in New Haven before 1850 and
had risen in the public esteem to become President of the New Haven Board of
Education. City fathers also named a school after him that still stands but
is no longer used as a school.

His two sons operated an importing-exporting business in the city and
represented several shipping lines, one of which was Red Star. If this
surmise is correct, he was told to use the name to get respect aboard the
ship.

Another possibility is the word "ZONDER" in Dutch (spoken in Holland) means
"without or alone." I believe he was traveling alone and perhaps HIAS or
some other agency bestowed the name on him. (Their are several ZONDERS in
the Detroit area (no relation) that are of Belgian extraction.)

However, I can concoct several other possible reasons for the name ZONDER,
but they are farther afield than the reasons already stated.

The important point herein is that our ancestors traveled with passports.
Ship's personnel only interviewed them for supplementary information
required on the arrival documents handed over to immigration authorities,

As for the different spelling in Lois' relatives papers, remember officials
were translating the name as it sounded. There were no rules as there are
today. Our immigrant ancestors spoke in dialect. Some spoke Litvak, other
Galitziana, or Palish (Polish) or Rushishuh. The differences would amaze
you.
Just the familiar Hebrew word Shabbat can be pronounced Shabess or Shabbos
or Shabbois in Yiddish.

Lenn Zonder
Woodbridge, CT
lenwrite@surfree.com


Osspakow #general

Joelle van den Berg-Lewkowicz <joellevandenberg@...>
 

Hello all!!

I am new at this and still have much to learn so pllease bear with me if
I am stupid!!

My grandfather Szlama Kalmowicz's death certificate (in France) lists his
birthplace as Osspakow, Poland, 1894 . I have found no reference at all
to such a place. Does anyone know if it is an old name that has been
changed?

Or perhaps this is the name of the Jewish quarter in another city? His
parents were both born in Lodz and instinct tells me this was probably
someplace close to that.

Thanks for your help,

Joelle Lewkowicz van den Berg
Kring van Dorth
Netherlands


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Osspakow #general

Joelle van den Berg-Lewkowicz <joellevandenberg@...>
 

Hello all!!

I am new at this and still have much to learn so pllease bear with me if
I am stupid!!

My grandfather Szlama Kalmowicz's death certificate (in France) lists his
birthplace as Osspakow, Poland, 1894 . I have found no reference at all
to such a place. Does anyone know if it is an old name that has been
changed?

Or perhaps this is the name of the Jewish quarter in another city? His
parents were both born in Lodz and instinct tells me this was probably
someplace close to that.

Thanks for your help,

Joelle Lewkowicz van den Berg
Kring van Dorth
Netherlands


Turn of Century Return to Russia #general

Sherribob <sherribob@...>
 

good evening 'Genners,

Would a woman who was born in Russia, and was living in NYC circa 1900, have
needed any form of documentation to return to Russia for a visit? She was
never naturalized. She may have gone back to visit her son either in Odessa
or Vilna.

Would this trip have generated any paper trail?

On her return passage, considering the fact she was a non-citizen, would she
possibly appear in the port of NY passenger index iregardless of whether she
travelled steerage or second class?

thanks for any info and ideas,

Sherri Bobish


Re: Schroda & Graetz, Posen #general

Irene Newhouse <newhoir@...>
 

The Jewish population of Posen was almost depleted by emigration even
before the area became part of Poland after WWI. Thus the lack of Yizkor
books.

Stebven Fischbach has compiled an excellent infofile for Jewish
genealogists with ancestors in Posen; it's in the J-gen infofiles,
naturally & contains background references.

Heppner & Herzberg wrote a 2-volume book on the history of Jews in Posen,
but it's long, long out of print & in German. Vol 2 has a history for
each of the 131 communities of Posen that had Jewish Community. vol 1 is
easy to get by interlibrary loand, but 2 is like pulling teeth & as far as
I know, only U of IL Urbana-Champaign has one [in the US]

In English, the only book I know of is Michael Zarchin's "Jews in the
Province of Posen", also decades out of print, but in a recent
search I found 3 copies for sale & bought one.

You might also check out the Posen links on my web site
http://members.nbci.com/newhoir/index.html I have posted my translation
of a 1909 German article on Jewish emigration >from Posen.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI


Boston vital records pre 1900 #general

Leslie Popelka
 

I am seeking marriage and birth records for family members who lived
in Massachusetts pre-1900. I believe that they lived in Boston and
that the Mass State Archives should have these records but they do
not. Any suggestions?

Leslie Rodman Popelka
St. Louis, MO


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Turn of Century Return to Russia #general

Sherribob <sherribob@...>
 

good evening 'Genners,

Would a woman who was born in Russia, and was living in NYC circa 1900, have
needed any form of documentation to return to Russia for a visit? She was
never naturalized. She may have gone back to visit her son either in Odessa
or Vilna.

Would this trip have generated any paper trail?

On her return passage, considering the fact she was a non-citizen, would she
possibly appear in the port of NY passenger index iregardless of whether she
travelled steerage or second class?

thanks for any info and ideas,

Sherri Bobish


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Schroda & Graetz, Posen #general

Irene Newhouse <newhoir@...>
 

The Jewish population of Posen was almost depleted by emigration even
before the area became part of Poland after WWI. Thus the lack of Yizkor
books.

Stebven Fischbach has compiled an excellent infofile for Jewish
genealogists with ancestors in Posen; it's in the J-gen infofiles,
naturally & contains background references.

Heppner & Herzberg wrote a 2-volume book on the history of Jews in Posen,
but it's long, long out of print & in German. Vol 2 has a history for
each of the 131 communities of Posen that had Jewish Community. vol 1 is
easy to get by interlibrary loand, but 2 is like pulling teeth & as far as
I know, only U of IL Urbana-Champaign has one [in the US]

In English, the only book I know of is Michael Zarchin's "Jews in the
Province of Posen", also decades out of print, but in a recent
search I found 3 copies for sale & bought one.

You might also check out the Posen links on my web site
http://members.nbci.com/newhoir/index.html I have posted my translation
of a 1909 German article on Jewish emigration >from Posen.

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Boston vital records pre 1900 #general

Leslie Popelka
 

I am seeking marriage and birth records for family members who lived
in Massachusetts pre-1900. I believe that they lived in Boston and
that the Mass State Archives should have these records but they do
not. Any suggestions?

Leslie Rodman Popelka
St. Louis, MO


Synagogues in Brooklyn #general

Daniel S. Katz <dsk@...>
 

Does anyone know anything about Congregation Ohel Abraham of Zitomer
that was located at 199 Christopher Ave. in Brooklyn in 1934.
Would all members of that synagogue have been >from Zitomer at
that time, or just the founders?

Also, I am looking for information on a synagogue in Bronxville
on Amboy that was started by a group including either Frank or
Nathan Cohen. Any ideas on what this might have been? Is there
information available about Brooklyn synagogues around 1900-1930?

Thanks,
Dan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Synagogues in Brooklyn #general

Daniel S. Katz <dsk@...>
 

Does anyone know anything about Congregation Ohel Abraham of Zitomer
that was located at 199 Christopher Ave. in Brooklyn in 1934.
Would all members of that synagogue have been >from Zitomer at
that time, or just the founders?

Also, I am looking for information on a synagogue in Bronxville
on Amboy that was started by a group including either Frank or
Nathan Cohen. Any ideas on what this might have been? Is there
information available about Brooklyn synagogues around 1900-1930?

Thanks,
Dan


New Bukowina database #general

Bruce Reisch <bir1@...>
 

Friends - A listing of more than 250 graduates (1885-1896) of the
Ober-Gymnasium (secondary school) in Radautz, Bukowina (now Radauti,
Romania) has just been posted:
http://mypage.bluewin.ch/bukowina/StudRad.html

In addition to the year of birth, the profession and town of
residence in 1897 is also given for each graduate. Work continues on
a database for graduates >from the Czernowitz Ober-Gymnasium.
Webmaster Peter Elbau deserves a round of applause for his hard work.
See http://mypage.bluewin.ch/bukowina/ for more information.
Bruce Reisch
Geneva, New York
RADAUTZ: http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/radauti/radautz.html
SADGURA: http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/sadgura/sadgura.html
Researching: REISCH, SCHECHTER, FEUERSTEIN - Sadgura, Bukowina, Ukraine
SCHACHTER, BRUCKER/BRUKER, HALPERN - Radauti, Bukowina, Romania
BRUCKER/BRUKER - Solca, Bukowina, Romania
WEISSMAN - Brody, Galicia, Ukraine SCHACHTER - Okup, Ukraine


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Bukowina database #general

Bruce Reisch <bir1@...>
 

Friends - A listing of more than 250 graduates (1885-1896) of the
Ober-Gymnasium (secondary school) in Radautz, Bukowina (now Radauti,
Romania) has just been posted:
http://mypage.bluewin.ch/bukowina/StudRad.html

In addition to the year of birth, the profession and town of
residence in 1897 is also given for each graduate. Work continues on
a database for graduates >from the Czernowitz Ober-Gymnasium.
Webmaster Peter Elbau deserves a round of applause for his hard work.
See http://mypage.bluewin.ch/bukowina/ for more information.
Bruce Reisch
Geneva, New York
RADAUTZ: http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/radauti/radautz.html
SADGURA: http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/sadgura/sadgura.html
Researching: REISCH, SCHECHTER, FEUERSTEIN - Sadgura, Bukowina, Ukraine
SCHACHTER, BRUCKER/BRUKER, HALPERN - Radauti, Bukowina, Romania
BRUCKER/BRUKER - Solca, Bukowina, Romania
WEISSMAN - Brody, Galicia, Ukraine SCHACHTER - Okup, Ukraine


Volunteer thank you! #general

Diane Frankel <dlfrankel@...>
 

This is a thank you >from the JewishGen LostnFound Support Desk to all of the
wonderful JewishGennners who volunteered to make phone calls in foreign
countries. We have kept all of your names and may call upon one or more of
you in the future. We appreciate your JewishGenerosity.

JewishGen LostnFound Desk
dlfrankel@mindspring.com


National Archives Lists of Korea and Vietnam Casuality lists #general

Adelle Gloger
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

After 'getting lost in cyberspace', I came accross a website for NARA
Center for Electronic Records. Accessible is a State-by-State listing of
casualities of the Korean and Vietnam Wars. The names of the men/women are
listed along with rank, branch of military, residence, date of birth, date
of death, cause of death. This looks like it might have some meaningful
information for those researching relatives who were killed/captured during
these conflicts. There is also available lists of US Military Personnel
from Canada, UK, Guam and other areas.
The direct link is:
<A HREF="http://www.nara.gov/nara/electronic/">Center for Electronic Records</A>

The URL is: http://www.nara.gov/nara/electronic/

I hope this site will be useful.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Shaker Hts., Ohio
agloger@aol.com


Re: Genealogical search engine #general

BetteJoy <bettejoy@...>
 

Tom, Thank you for a wonderful research site.

Betty Provizer Starkman
Michigan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Volunteer thank you! #general

Diane Frankel <dlfrankel@...>
 

This is a thank you >from the JewishGen LostnFound Support Desk to all of the
wonderful JewishGennners who volunteered to make phone calls in foreign
countries. We have kept all of your names and may call upon one or more of
you in the future. We appreciate your JewishGenerosity.

JewishGen LostnFound Desk
dlfrankel@mindspring.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen National Archives Lists of Korea and Vietnam Casuality lists #general

Adelle Gloger
 

Dear JewishGen Community,

After 'getting lost in cyberspace', I came accross a website for NARA
Center for Electronic Records. Accessible is a State-by-State listing of
casualities of the Korean and Vietnam Wars. The names of the men/women are
listed along with rank, branch of military, residence, date of birth, date
of death, cause of death. This looks like it might have some meaningful
information for those researching relatives who were killed/captured during
these conflicts. There is also available lists of US Military Personnel
from Canada, UK, Guam and other areas.
The direct link is:
<A HREF="http://www.nara.gov/nara/electronic/">Center for Electronic Records</A>

The URL is: http://www.nara.gov/nara/electronic/

I hope this site will be useful.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Shaker Hts., Ohio
agloger@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Genealogical search engine #general

BetteJoy <bettejoy@...>
 

Tom, Thank you for a wonderful research site.

Betty Provizer Starkman
Michigan